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  1. GreenSock

    ScrollToPlugin

    Allows GSAP to animate the scroll position of the window (like doing window.scrollTo(x, y)) or a <div> DOM element (like doing myDiv.scrollTop = y; myDiv.scrollLeft = x;). To scroll the window to a particular position, use window as the target of the tween like this: //scroll to 400 pixels down from the top gsap.to(window, {duration: 2, scrollTo: 400}); //or to scroll to the element with the ID "#someID": gsap.to(window, {duration: 2, scrollTo:"#someID"}); //or to specify which axis (x or y), use the object syntax: gsap.to(window, {duration: 2, scrollTo: {y: 400, x: 250}}); Or to tween the content of a div, make sure you've set the overflow:scroll on the div and then do this: //scroll to 250 pixels down from the top of the content in the div gsap.to(myDiv, {duration: 2, scrollTo: 250}); Learn more in the ScrollToPlugin documentation. To learn how to include the ScrollToPlugin into your project, see the GSAP install docs.
  2. Scrambles the text in a DOM element with randomized characters (uppercase by default, but you can define lowercase or a set of custom characters), refreshing new randomized characters at regular intervals while gradually revealing your new text (or the original text) over the course of the tween (left to right). Visually it looks like a computer decoding a string of text. Great for rollovers. See the Pen GSAP Scramble Text Plugin - feature plugin page by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. You can simply pass a string of text directly as the scrambleText and it'll use the defaults for revealing it, or you can customize the settings by using a generic object with any of the following properties: text : String - The text that should replace the existing text in the DOM element. If omitted (or if "{original}"), the original text will be used. chars : String - The characters that should be randomly swapped in to the scrambled portion the text. You can use "upperCase", "lowerCase", "upperAndLowerCase", or a custom string of characters, like "XO" or "TMOWACB", or "jompaWB!^", etc. (Default: "upperCase") tweenLength : Boolean - If the length of the replacement text is different than the original text, the difference will be gradually tweened so that the length doesn't suddenly jump. For example, if the original text is 50 characters and the replacement text is 100 characters, during the tween the number of characters would gradually move from 50 to 100 instead of jumping immediatley to 100. However, if you'd prefer to have it immediately jump, set tweenLength to false. (Default: true) revealDelay : Number - If you'd like the reveal (unscrambling) of the new text to be delayed for a certain portion of the tween so that the scrambled text is entirely visible for a while, use revealDelay to define the time you'd like to elapse before the reveal begins. For example, if the tween's duration is 3 seconds but you'd like the scrambled text to remain entirely visible for first 1 second of the tween, you'd set revealDelay to 1. (Default: 0) newClass : String - If you'd like the new text to have a particular class applied (using a <span> tag wrapped around it), use newClass:"YOUR_CLASS_NAME". This makes it easy to create a distinct look for the new text. (Default: null) oldClass : String - If you'd like the old (original) text to have a particular class applied (using a <span> tag wrapped around it), use oldClass:"YOUR_CLASS_NAME". This makes it easy to create a distinct look for the old text. (Default: null) speed : Number - Controls how frequently the scrambled characters are refreshed. The default is 1 but you could slow things down by using 0.2 for example (or any number). (Default: 1) delimiter : String - By default, each character is replaced one-by-one, but if you'd prefer to have things revealed word-by-word, you could use a delimiter of " " (space). (Default: "") //use the defaults gsap.to(element, {duration: 1, scrambleText:"THIS IS NEW TEXT"}); //or customize things: gsap.to(element, {duration: 1, scrambleText:{text:"THIS IS NEW TEXT", chars:"XO", revealDelay:0.5, speed:0.3, newClass:"myClass"}}); Demos ScrambleText Demos To learn how to include ScrambleText into your project, see the GSAP install docs.
  3. Note: This plugin was replaced by SnapPlugin in GSAP 3. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. If you'd like the inbetween values in a tween to always get rounded to the nearest integer, use the roundProps special property. Just pass in a comma-delimited String containing the property names that you'd like rounded. For example, if you're tweening the x, y, and alpha properties of mc and you want to round the x and y values (not alpha) every time the tween is rendered, you'd do: TweenMax.to(element, 2, {x:300, y:200, alpha:0.5, roundProps:"x,y"});
  4. GreenSock

    RaphaelPlugin

    Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Enables TweenLite and TweenMax to animate properties of Raphael JavaScript objects (see http://www.raphaeljs.com/). Raphael is a JavaScript framework that simplifies work with vector graphics on the web. For example: // creates canvas 550 × 400 at 10, 50 var paper = Raphael(10, 50, 550, 400); // creates rectangle at x = 50, y = 40, with a width of 200 and height of 100 var rect = paper.rect(50, 40, 200, 100); // sets the fill attribute of the rectangle to red (#f00) rect.attr("fill", "#f00"); // tween the fill to blue (#00f) and x to 100, y to 100, width to 100 and height to 50 over the course of 3 seconds using an ease of Power1.easeInOut TweenLite.to(rect, 3, {raphael:{fill:"#00f", x:100, y:100, width:100, height:50}, ease:Power1.easeInOut}); You can tween any of the properties that you would normally set using raphael's attr() method as well as the following transformation properties: rotation, scaleX, scaleY, skewX, skewY, tx and ty and even shortRotation which will rotate in the shortest direction to the destination value. tx and ty refer to the translation x and y properties (e and f from the element's matrix). This gives you a lot of control, even beyond what's easily accomplished through Raphael's own methods. Learn more in the RaphaelPlugin documentation.
  5. Sometimes it's useful to tween a value at a particular velocity and/or acceleration without a specific end value in mind. PhysicsPropsPlugin allows you to tween any numeric property of any object based on these concepts. Keep in mind that any easing equation you define for your tween will be completely ignored for these properties. Instead, the physics parameters will determine the movement/easing. These parameters, by the way, are not intended to be dynamically updateable, but one unique convenience is that everything is reverseable. So if you create several physics-based tweens, for example, and throw them into a timeline, you could simply call reverse() on the timeline to watch the objects retrace their steps right back to the beginning. Here are the parameters you can define (note that friction and acceleration are both completely optional): velocity : Number - The initial velocity of the object measured in units per second (or for tweens where useFrames is true, it would be measured per frame). (Default: 0) acceleration : Number - The amount of acceleration applied to the object, measured in units per second (or for tweens where useFrames is true, it would be measured per frame). (Default: 0) friction : Number - A value between 0 and 1 where 0 is no friction, 0.08 is a small amount of friction, and 1 will completely prevent any movement. This is not meant to be precise or scientific in any way, but it serves as an easy way to apply a friction-like physics effect to your tween. Generally it is best to experiment with this number a bit, starting at a very low value like 0.02. Also note that friction requires more processing than physics tweens without any friction. (Default: 0) gsap.to(elem, { duration: 2, physicsProps: { x: {velocity: 100, acceleration: 200}, y: {velocity: -200, friction: 0.1} } }); Demos PhysicsProps Demos To learn how to include the PhysicsPropsPlugin into your project, see the GSAP install docs.
  6. GreenSock

    Physics2DPlugin

    Provides simple physics functionality for tweening an object's x and y coordinates (or "left" and "top") based on a combination of velocity, angle, gravity, acceleration, accelerationAngle, and/or friction. It is not intended to replace a full-blown physics engine and does not offer collision detection, but serves as a way to easily create interesting physics-based effects with the GreenSock animation platform. Parameters are not intended to be dynamically updateable, but one unique convenience is that everything is reverseable. So if you spawn a bunch of particle tweens, for example, and throw them into a timeline, you could simply call reverse() on the timeline to watch the particles retrace their steps right back to the beginning. Keep in mind that any easing equation you define for your tween will be completely ignored for these properties. Usage gsap.to(element, {duration: 2, physics2D: {velocity: 300, angle: -60, acceleration: 50, accelerationAngle: 180}}); See the Pen Physics2D Demo by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Learn more in the Physics2DPlugin documentation. Demos Physics2D Demos To learn how to include Physics2D into your project, see the GSAP install docs.
  7. GreenSock

    EaselPlugin

    Tweens special EaselJS-related properties for things like saturation, contrast, tint, colorize, brightness, exposure, and hue which leverage EaselJS's ColorFilter and ColorMatrixFilter (see http://www.createjs.com/#!/EaselJS for more information about EaselJS). Of course you don't need the plugin to tween normal numeric properties of EaselJS objects (like x and y), but some filters or effects require special manipulation which is what EaselPlugin is for. Currently it only handles special properties related to ColorFilter and ColorMatrixFilter, and it can tween the "frame" property of a MovieClip. GreenSock's EaselPlugin exposes convenient properties that aren't a part of EaselJS's API like "tint", "tintAmount", "exposure", and "brightness" for ColorFilter, as well as "saturation", "hue", "contrast", "colorize", and "colorizeAmount" for ColorMatrixFilter. Learn more in the EaselPlugin documentation.
  8. Note: This plugin was removed from GSAP 3. However, you can register this unofficial plugin to get the effect back. Tweens any rotation-related property to another value in a particular direction which can be either clockwise ("_cw" suffix), counter-clockwise ("_ccw" suffix), or in the shortest direction ("_short" suffix) in which case the plugin chooses the direction for you based on the shortest path. For example: //obj.rotation starts at 45 var obj = {rotation:45}; // In GSAP 3 directionalRotation is built in): //tweens to the 270 position in a clockwise direction gsap.to(obj, {duration: 1, directionalRotation: {rotation: "270_cw"}}); //tweens to the 270 position in a counter-clockwise direction gsap.to(obj, {duration: 1, directionalRotation: {rotation: "270_ccw"}}); //tweens to the 270 position in the shortest direction (which, in this case, is counter-clockwise) gsap.to(obj, {duration: 1, directionalRotation: {rotation:"270_short"}}); // In GSAP 2 (directionRotation is an external plugin): //tweens to the 270 position in a clockwise direction TweenLite.to(obj, 1, {directionalRotation:"270_cw"}); //tweens to the 270 position in a counter-clockwise direction TweenLite.to(obj, 1, {directionalRotation:"270_ccw"}); //tweens to the 270 position in the shortest direction (which, in this case, is counter-clockwise) TweenLite.to(obj, 1, {directionalRotation:"270_short"}); We used rotation here but it could be anything, like newRot.x. Notice that the value is in quotes, thus a string with a particular suffix indicating the direction ("_cw", "_ccw", or "_short"). You can also use the "+=" or "-=" prefix to indicate relative values.
  9. GreenSock

    CSSRulePlugin

    Allows GSAP to animate the raw style sheet rules which affect all objects of a particular selector rather than affecting an individual DOM element's style (that's what the CSSPlugin is for). For example, if you have a CSS class named ".myClass" that sets background-color to "#FF0000", you could tween that to a different color and ALL of the objects on the page that use ".myClass" would have their background color change. Typically it is best to use the regular CSSPlugin to animate css-related properties of individual elements so that you can get very precise control over each object, but sometimes it can be useful to tween the global rules themselves instead. For example, pseudo elements (like :after, :before, etc. are impossible to reference directly in JavaScript, but you can animate them using CSSRulePlugin as shown below. See the Pen CSSRulePlugin by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Learn more in the CSSRulePlugin documentation. To learn how to include the CSSRulePlugin into your project, see the GSAP install docs.
  10. GreenSock

    CSSPlugin

    With the help of the CSSPlugin, GSAP can animate almost any CSS-related property of DOM elements including the obvious things like width, height, margin, padding, top, left, and more plus more interesting things like transforms (rotation, scaleX, scaleY, skewX, skewY, x, y, rotationX, and rotationY), colors, opacity, and lots more. Because animating DOM elements in the browser is so common, GSAP automatically checks to see if the target is a DOM element and if it is (and you haven't already defined a "css" object in the vars parameter), the engine creates that css object for you and shifts any properties that aren't reserved (like onComplete, ease, delay, etc. or plugin keywords like scrollTo, morphSVG, pixi, etc.) into that css object when the tween renders for the first time. We recommend using the more concise style that omits the css:{} object but be aware that either style is acceptable. Learn more in the CSSPlugin documentation.
  11. GreenSock uses a very permissive license that allows you to use the tools for free for everything except a very specific type of commercial use (if you collect a fee from multiple customers for the same app/product/site that uses GreenSock tools) which makes it extremely accessible and business-friendly while providing a small funding mechanism to sustain ongoing support, enhancement, and innovation. The web is littered with abandoned “open source” projects, but GreenSock has a years-long track record of commitment to the platform. This unique licensing model is a key component of that sustainability. If multiple customers are charged a usage/access/license fee of any kind, please simply sign up for a “Business Green” Club GreenSock membership which comes with a special commercial license granting you permission to do so. Click here for details. Joining the club also gets you members-only bonus plugins, classes, update notifications, and more. Please see the licensing page for details.
  12. No need to worry. Tweens and timelines are automatically made eligible for garbage collection (gc) when appropriate (typically when they finish but if you maintain a reference to an instance so that you can restart it later, for example, it won’t be gc’d out from under you). Basically the system manages gc for you and generally cleans up after itself.
  13. CSS3 transitions have some significant limitations that make them unworkable for a serious animation platform. They don’t provide precise controls over the timing or easing. They’re great for simple effects but the GreenSock Animation Platform delivers extremely precise rendering, so you can do things like pause() and reverse() an animation anytime or skip to a specific time and play from there, etc. Try creating a CSS3 transition that uses an elastic.out or slow motion ease and then jump to 0.72494-seconds into a 2-second transition and pause() only to resume() later. It’s impossible from what I understand. So no, the platform doesn’t make use of CSS3 transitions. However, it is highly optimized for performance. See the detailed cage match where GSAP battles CSS3 transitions where there’s a detailed comparison in several categories.
  14. SplitText is an easy to use JavaScript utility that allows you to split HTML text into characters, words and lines. Its easy to use, extremely flexible and works all the way back to IE9 (IE8 for GSAP 2's version). Although SplitText is naturally a good fit for creating HTML5 text animation effects with GreenSock's animation tools, it has no dependencies on GSAP, jQuery or any other libraries. Note that the video below uses GSAP 2's format. .videoNav { color:#555; margin-top: 12px; } 0:00 Intro 0:21 SplitText solves problems 2:01 Basic Split 3:34 Configuration options 6:35 Animation View the JS panel in the CodePen demo above to see how easy it is to: Split text into words and characters. Pass the chars array into a from() tween for animation. Revert the text back to its pre-split state when you are done animating. Additional features and notes You can specify a new class to be added to each split element and also add an auto-incrementing class like .word1, .word2, .word3 etc. View demo You don't have to manually insert <br>tags, SplitText honors natural line breaks. SplitText doesn't force non-breaking spaces into the divs like many other solutions on the web do. SplitText is not designed to work with SVG <text> nodes. Learn more in our detailed SplitText API documentation. Please visit our SplitText Codepen Collection for more demos of SplitText in action. Where can I get it? SplitText is a membership benefit of Club GreenSock ("Shockingly Green" and "Business Green" levels). Joining Club GreenSock gets you a bunch of other bonus plugins and tools like InertiaPlugin as well, so check out greensock.com/club/ to get details and sign up today. The support of club members has been critical to the success of GreenSock - it's what makes building these tools possible. To learn how to include SplitText into your project, see the GSAP install docs. Demos SplitText Demos
  15. Note: This plugin was removed from GSAP 3. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Tweens any color-related property of any object, like myObject.borderColor from "rgb(255,0,51)" to "rgb(102,204,0)" (and you can define the initial color in almost any format like "#FF00CC" or "rgba(255,0,51,0.5)" or "red" or "#f0c" or 0xFF00CC or "hsl(105,50%,80%)"). New values are always set in the format "rgb(...)" (or rgba(...) for values that include alpha). You can tween an unlimited number of color properties simultaneously. Just use the associated property name inside the colorProps:{} object like this: //tweens myObject.borderColor and myObject.myCustomProp TweenLite.to(myObject, 1, {colorProps:{borderColor:"red", myCustomProp:"rgb(204,51,0)"}, ease:Linear.easeNone}); ColorPropsPlugin is NOT generally intended to be used with css-related color properties because the CSSPlugin already handles those. ColorPropsPlugin is meant to tween other color-related properties directly on your JavaScript object(s). To learn more read the ColorPropsPlugin documentation.
  16. GreenSock

    BezierPlugin

    Note: This plugin was replaced with MotionPathPlugin in GSAP 3. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Animate virtually any property (or properties) along a curved Bezier path which you define as an array of points/values that can be interpreted 4 different ways (described as the Bezier's "type", like type:"soft"? "thru" (the default) - the plugin figures out how to draw the Bezier naturally through the supplied values using a proprietary algorithm. The values you provide in the array are essentially treated as anchors on the Bezier and the plugin calculates the control points. The target's current/starting values are used as the initial anchor. You can define a curviness special property that allows you to adjust the tension on the Bezier where 0 has no curviness (straight lines), 1 is normal curviness, 2 is twice the normal curviness, etc. Since "thru" is the default Bezier type, you don't need to define a type at all if this is the one you want. "soft" - the values that you provide in the array act almost like magnets that attract the curve towards them, but the Bezier doesn't typically travel through them. They are treated as control points on a Quadratic Bezier and the plugin creates the necessary intermediate anchors. The target's current/starting values are used as the initial anchor. "quadratic" - allows you to define standard Quadratic Bezier data (Quadratic Beziers have 1 control point between each anchor). The array should start with the first anchor, then control point, then anchor, control point, etc. for as many iterations as you want, but obviously make sure that it starts and ends with anchors. "cubic" - allows you to define standard Cubic Bezier data (Cubic Beziers have 2 control points between each anchor). The array should start with the first anchor, then 2 control points, then anchor, 2 control points, anchor, etc. for as many iterations as you want, but obviously make sure that it starts and ends with anchors. For full details please consult the BezierPlugin documentation.
  17. GreenSock

    AttrPlugin

    Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Tweens any numeric attribute of a DOM element. For example, let's say your DOM element looks like this: <rect id="rect" fill="none" x="0" y="0" width="500" height="400"></rect> You could tween the "x", "y", "width", or "height" attributes using AttrPlugin like this: TweenLite.to("#rect", 1, {attr:{x:100, y:50, width:100, height:100}, ease:Linear.easeNone}); You can tween an unlimited number of attributes simultaneously. Just use the associated property name inside the attr:{} object. AttrPlugin is NOT intended to be used with css-related properties because the CSSPlugin already handles those. Note: a common mistake is to forget to wrap attributes in a attr:{} object which is essential for specifying your intent.
  18. The team from Goodboy went all out on this FWA award-winning site. You can read more about the project here.
  19. I was asked on Facebook about using GSAP in banner ads that are created for/in the MRAID system, and since Facebook is really bad for tech support and posting code, I figured I'd start a topic here so others could benefit too... You can create and test an ad in a browser-based simulator here: http://webtester.mraid.org/. I noticed that there was a problem with the simulator or MRAID itself that was causing it to trigger the ad BEFORE 3rd party libraries had finished loading. So in this case, TweenLite wasn't defined yet, thus no animations would work. The simple workaround is to add some conditional logic so that your animation code doesn't run until both MRAID is ready and TweenLite/CSSPlugin has loaded. Here's a simple example that seems to work fine in the simulator: <script src="http://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/gsap/1.11.7/TweenLite.min.js"></script> <script src="http://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/gsap/1.11.7/plugins/CSSPlugin.min.js"></script> <div id="box" style="background-color:green; width:100px; height: 50px; position:absolute;"></div> <script> //this method gets called when the ad is ready and should run. function runMyAd() { TweenLite.to("#box", 2, {y:100, opacity:0.5}); } //this function keeps checking to see if mraid is ready and TweenMax has finished loading. function doReadyCheck() { if (mraid.isViewable() && window.TweenLite) { runMyAd(); } else { setTimeout(doReadyCheck, 100); } } doReadyCheck(); </script> Useful link: Common problems and best practices: http://www.iab.net/media/file/MRAID_Best_Practices_Final.pdf
  20. See the Pen SplitText: Multiple Split Types by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. This demo shows how you can split text into characters, lines and words (or any combination). Check out how easy it is to animate text once it is split. Be sure to check out SplitText and the [docs id="js.SplitText" linktext="SplitText documentation"].
  21. See the Pen Draggable "Toss" Demo (4col) by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. See many of Draggables properties in action including bounds, liveSnap, snap, edgeResistance and more. This demo is a great starting point to get familiar with Draggable and ThrowProps plugin. Fork, edit and enjoy! Be sure to read the [docs id="js.Draggable" linktext="Draggable Documentation"].
  22. I have been trying to work using the skewX and skewY properties. For some reason skewY has been acting very strange, although skewX seems to work fine. Here : http://codepen.io/praneybehl/pen/lkhFn Is this a bug? Thanks, Praney
  23. GreenSock

    Bright Media

    Bright Media is an agency with an award winning portfolio. Be sure to check out the ground-breaking animation on this FWA Site of the Day.
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