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  1. The secret to building gorgeous sequences with precise timing is understanding the position parameter which is used in many methods throughout GSAP. This one super-flexible parameter controls the placement of your tweens, labels, callbacks, pauses, and even nested timelines, so you'll be able to literally place anything anywhere in any sequence. Watch the video For a quick overview of the position parameter, check out this video from the "GSAP 3 Express" course by Snorkl.tv - one of the best ways to learn the basics of GSAP 3. Using position with gsap.to() This article will focus on the gsap.to() method for adding tweens to a Tween, but it works the same in other methods like from(), fromTo(), add(), etc. Notice that the position parameter comes after the vars parameter: .to( target, vars, position ) Since it's so common to chain animations one-after-the-other, the default position is "+=0" which just means "at the end", so timeline.to(...).to(...) chains those animations back-to-back. It's fine to omit the position parameter in this case. But what if you want them to overlap, or start at the same time, or have a gap between them? No problem. Multiple behaviors You can define the position in any of the following ways At an absolute time (1) Relative to the end of a timeline allowing for gaps ("+=1") or overlaps ("-=1") At a label ("someLabel") Relative to a label ("someLabel+=1") Relative to the previously added tween ("<" references the most recently-added animation's START time while ">" references the most recently-added animation's END time) Basic code usage tl.to(element, 1, {x: 200}) //1 second after end of timeline (gap) .to(element, {duration: 1, y: 200}, "+=1") //0.5 seconds before end of timeline (overlap) .to(element, {duration: 1, rotation: 360}, "-=0.5") //at exactly 6 seconds from the beginning of the timeline .to(element, {duration: 1, scale: 4}, 6); It can also be used to add tweens at labels or relative to labels //add a label named scene1 at an exact time of 2-seconds into the timeline tl.add("scene1", 2) //add tween at scene1 label .to(element, {duration: 4, x: 200}, "scene1") //add tween 3 seconds after scene1 label .to(element, {duration: 1, opacity: 0}, "scene1+=3"); Sometimes technical explanations and code snippets don't do these things justice. Take a look at the interactive examples below. No position: Direct Sequence If no position parameter is provided, all tweens will run in direct succession. .content .demoBody code.prettyprint, .content .demoBody pre.prettyprint { margin:0; } .content .demoBody pre.prettyprint { width:8380px; } .content .demoBody code, .main-content .demoBody code { background-color:transparent; font-size:18px; line-height:22px; } .demoBody { background-color:#1d1d1d; font-family: 'Signika Negative', sans-serif; color:#989898; font-size:16px; width:838px; margin:auto; } .timelineDemo { margin:auto; background-color:#1d1d1d; width:800px; padding:20px 0; } .demoBody h1, .demoBody h2, .demoBody h3 { margin: 10px 0 10px 0; color:#f3f2ef; } .demoBody h1 { font-size:36px; } .demoBody h2 { font-size:18px; font-weight:300; } .demoBody h3 { font-size:24px; } .demoBody p{ line-height:22px; margin-bottom:16px; width:650px; } .timelineDemo .box { width:50px; height:50px; position:relative; border-radius:6px; margin-bottom:4px; } .timelineDemo .green{ background-color:#6fb936; } .timelineDemo .orange { background-color:#f38630; } .timelineDemo .blue { background-color:#338; } .timleineUI-row{ background-color:#2f2f2f; margin:2px 0; padding:4px 0; } .secondMarker { width:155px; border-left: solid 1px #aaa; display:inline-block; position:relative; line-height:16px; font-size:16px; padding-left:4px; color:#777; } .timelineUI-tween{ position:relative; width:160px; height:16px; border-radius:8px; background: #a0bc58; /* Old browsers */ background: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #a0bc58 0%, #66832f 100%); /* FF3.6+ */ background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, color-stop(0%,#a0bc58), color-stop(100%,#66832f)); /* Chrome,Safari4+ */ background: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, #a0bc58 0%,#66832f 100%); /* Chrome10+,Safari5.1+ */ background: -o-linear-gradient(top, #a0bc58 0%,#66832f 100%); /* Opera 11.10+ */ background: -ms-linear-gradient(top, #a0bc58 0%,#66832f 100%); /* IE10+ */ background: linear-gradient(to bottom, #a0bc58 0%,#66832f 100%); /* W3C */ filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient( startColorstr='#a0bc58', endColorstr='#66832f',GradientType=0 ); /* IE6-9 */ } .timelineUI-dragger-track{ position:relative; width:810px; margin-top:20px; } .timelineUI-dragger{ position:absolute; width:10px; height:100px; top:-20px; } .timelineUI-dragger div{ position:relative; width: 0px; height: 0; border-style: solid; border-width: 20px 10px 0 10px; border-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.4) transparent transparent transparent; left:-10px; } .timelineUI-dragger div::after { content:" "; position:absolute; width:1px; height:95px; top:-1px; left:-1px; border-left: solid 2px rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.4); } .timelineUI-dragger div::before { content:" "; position:absolute; width:20px; height:114px; top:-20px; left:-10px; } .timelineUI-time{ position:relative; font-size:30px; text-align:center; } .controls { margin:10px 2px; } .prettyprint { font-size:20px; line-height:24px; } .timelineUI-button { background: #414141; background-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, #575757, #414141); background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #575757, #414141); background-image: -ms-linear-gradient(top, #575757, #414141); background-image: -o-linear-gradient(top, #575757, #414141); background-image: linear-gradient(to bottom, #575757, #414141); text-shadow: 0px 1px 0px #414141; -webkit-box-shadow: 0px 1px 0px 414141; -moz-box-shadow: 0px 1px 0px 414141; box-shadow: 0px 1px 0px 414141; color: #ffffff; text-decoration: none; margin: 0 auto; -webkit-border-radius: 4; -moz-border-radius: 4; border-radius: 4px; font-family: "Signika Negative", sans-serif; text-transform: uppercase; font-weight: 600; display: table; cursor: pointer; font-size: 13px; line-height: 18px; outline:none; border:none; display:inline-block; padding: 8px 14px;} .timelineUI-button:hover { background: #57a818; background-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, #57a818, #4d9916); background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #57a818, #4d9916); background-image: -ms-linear-gradient(top, #57a818, #4d9916); background-image: -o-linear-gradient(top, #57a818, #4d9916); background-image: linear-gradient(to bottom, #57a818, #4d9916); text-shadow: 0px 1px 0px #32610e; -webkit-box-shadow: 0px 1px 0px fefefe; -moz-box-shadow: 0px 1px 0px fefefe; box-shadow: 0px 1px 0px fefefe; color: #ffffff; text-decoration: none; } .element-box { background: #ffffff; border-radius: 6px; border: 1px solid #cccccc; padding: 17px 26px 17px 26px; font-weight: 400; font-size: 18px; color: #555555; margin-bottom:20px; } .demoBody .prettyprint { min-width:300px; } His animation is a bit out of whack and the client has the following demands for you: Man should start animating 1 second before car animation ends. One second after man animation ends both car and lift should go up simultaneously. For a visual representation of what the finished product should like, here is a .mov and .gif. Alright it's time to put your animation chops to the test. Challenge instructions Visit the editable version of the animation starter file on CodePen. Click the "fork" button to make your own copy. When you're done, tweet the CodePen link to @greensock. We'll make you feel extra special. There are multiple solutions that require only adding the proper position parameters. Some are more flexible than others, but the important part right now is that the end result meets the clients demands. .demoBody { max-width: 94vw; width: 100%; height: auto; overflow: auto; }
  2. GreenSock

    Ease Visualizer

    The ease-y way to find the perfect ease A solid mastery of easing is what separates the top-notch animators from the hacks. Use this tool to play around and understand how various eases "feel". Notice that you can click the underlined words in the code sample at the bottom to make changes. Some eases have special configuration options that open up a world of possibilities. If you need more specifics, head over to the docs. Quick Video Tour of the Ease Visualizer A special thanks to Jamie Barlow who built almost the entire thing. He's one of our all-stars in the forums, lending his wisdom and animation prowess to our whole community. He's a rock star. Take your animations to the next level with CustomEase CustomEase frees you from the limitations of canned easing options; create literally any easing curve imaginable by simply drawing it in the Ease Visualizer or by copying/pasting an SVG path. Zero limitations. Use as many control points as you want. Grab CustomEase below or find out more.
  3. Did you know you can tween a tween? What does that even mean? Well, tweens (and timelines) are JavaScript objects that have their own getter-setter methods that allow you to either get or set values. If you make a tween or timeline the target of a tween you can then tween its progress() and timeScale() just like you would the opacity of a DOM element! The video below explains how this works and also shows you how to tween getter setter methods in your own JavaScript objects. Watch the video Demo 1: Tween progress() See the Pen Tween a tween (video) by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Demo 2: Tween timeScale() See the Pen Tween timeScale() of a Timeline by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen.
  4. Before jumping into Club GreenSock for the super-cool bonus plugins, perhaps you're plagued by questions like: Will the bonus plugins work well for my project? How difficult is the API to work with? Will they play nicely with my other tools? Will they work in Edge? Firefox? ... That's why we created special versions of the plugins that can be used on CodePen anytime...for FREE! The video below shows how to get up and running fast. Video Demo with quick-copy URLs See the Pen Try Club GreenSock Bonus Plugins FREE on Codepen by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Template (fork this): See the Pen GreenSock Bonus Starter Template by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Of course we offer a money-back satisfaction guarantee with Club GreenSock anyway, but hopefully this helps give you even more confidence to sign up. CodePen is an online, browser-based editor that makes it easy to write and share front-end code. If you need help using CodePen check out their interactive editor tour.
  5. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. We recommend using GSAP 3's motionPath instead of the approach outlined here. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. GSAP's BezierPlugin enables you to animate any object along a complex bezier curve. However, it isn't simple for most people to generate the exact coordinates of all the anchor and control points needed to describe a Cubic or Quadratic bezier curve. MorphSVGPlugin to the rescue MorphSVGPlugin's main responsibility is morphing SVG paths and in order to do that, it converts SVG path data internally into bezier curves. We thought it would be convenient to allow users to tap into that functionality. MorphSVGPlugin.pathDataToBezier() converts SVG <path> data into an array of cubic Bezier points that can be fed into a BezierPlugin tween (basically using it as a motion guide)! Watch the video Demo Aren't there other tools that do this? Sure, you could find some github repos or dusty old WordPress blogs that have some tools that move objects along a path. The problem is, what do you do when you need to incorporate one of these animations with other effects? Before long you're loading 5 different tools from different developers and none of the tools can "talk to each other". Choreographing a complex animation becomes a nightmare. What happens when you need to pause or reverse an animation from one of these "free" tools? Chances are you'll be spending dozens of hours trying to make it all work. With GSAP, all our plugins work seamlessly together. Any animation you create using any plugin can be synchronized with hundreds of others. Suppose your client comes to you with a small project with the following requirements: Morph a hippo into an elephant Progressively reveal a curved path Animate the elephant along the path Display captions for each animation Make sure you can play, pause, and reverse the entire sequence Sounds silly, but something like this should be a breeze. How many hours are you going to spend just looking for the tools you need? With GSAP you can build it all in under an hour, with less than a dozen lines of code. See the Pen Sequence of Bonus Plugins by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. The demo above uses MorphSVG, DrawSVG and ScrambleText which are available to Club GreenSock members. For more information check out the many benefits of joining Club GreenSock.
  6. Want to learn GSAP, but not sure where to start? Nothing beats our official hands-on video training. I'm Carl Schooff, GreenSock's Geek Ambassador. I recorded videos for every lesson we've been using in classrooms and corporations across the country, so you can now access the same material from the convenience of your own computer. Each lesson focuses on core features of GSAP that you get to see applied in small, real-world projects. Starting with a simple tween, I'll walk you through the most powerful features of the GSAP API. You'll learn how to create elaborate sequences with our timeline tools that are easy to edit and control. Along the way I'll show you the pitfalls to avoid and the pro tips that'll save you time and ensure you do things the "right" way. What you will learn in this course will put you light-years beyond any self-training or free tutorials you'll find online. By the end of the course you'll marvel at how easy it is to get big results with just a little code! In addition to over 5 hours of HD video, each lesson comes with source files and detailed, step-by-step instructions so you can do each exercise at your own pace. These official GreenSock training videos are available exclusively from our friends at NobleDesktop. Jump on over to Learn HTML5 Animation With GreenSock for more details, demos, and a sample lesson. Get the Video and eBook Bundle
  7. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. This video walks you through some common problems that professional animators face every day and shows you how GSAP’s TimelineLite tackles these challenges with ease. Although GSAP is very powerful and flexible, the API is beginner-friendly. In no time you will be creating TimelineLite animations that can bend and adapt to the needs of the most demanding clients and art directors. Watch the video and ask yourself, "Can my current animation toolset do this?" Enjoy. Video Highlights Tweens in a TimelineLite naturally play one-after-the-other (the default insertion point is at the end of the timeline). No need to specify or update the delay of each tween every time the slightest timing changes are made. Tweens in a TimelineLite don't need to play in direct sequence; you can overlap them or easily add gaps. Multiple tweens can all start at the same time or slightly staggered. Easily to rearrange the order in which tweens play. Jump to any point of the timeline to finesse a particular animation. No need to watch the whole animation each time. Add labels anywhere in the timeline to mark where other tweens should be added, or use them for navigation. Control the speed of the timeline with timeScale(). Full control over every aspect of playback: play, pause, reverse, resume, jump to any label or time, and much more. Unlike jQuery.animate() or other JS libraries that allow you to chain together multiple animations on a particular object, GSAP’s TimelineLite lets you sequence multiple tweens on multiple objects. It's a radically different and more practical approach that allows for precise synchronization and flexibility. If you are still considering CSS3 animations or transitions for robust animation after watching this video, please watch it again Check out this Pen! If you are wondering what "autoAlpha" refers to in the code above, its a convenience feature of CSSPlugin that intelligently handles "opacity" and "visibility" combined. Recommended reading: Main GSAP JS page Jump Start: GSAP JS Speed comparison Cage matches: CSS3 transitions vs GSAP | jQuery vs GSAP jQuery.animate() with GSAP: get the jquery.gsap.js plugin! 3D Transforms & More CSS3 Goodies Arrive in GSAP JS
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