Jump to content
GreenSock

Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'update'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • GreenSock Forums
    • GSAP
    • Banner Animation
    • Jobs & Freelance
  • Flash / ActionScript Archive
    • GSAP (Flash)
    • Loading (Flash)
    • TransformManager (Flash)

Product Groups

  • Club GreenSock
  • TransformManager

Categories

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 9 results

  1. GSAP 3 is the most significant upgrade we have ever had. With 50+ new features, there's a lot to be excited about, but to keep this post manageable, we’ll cover only 5. You might also be interested in the GSAP 3 highlights video. See the release notes for all the juicy details. 1. Half the size of the old TweenMax! No kidding! GSAP retains almost all of its old functionality while adding 50+ features. We’ve learned a lot over the years and hopefully that shows. The core has been completely rebuilt from the ground up as modern ES modules. 2. Simplified API No more “Lite” and “Max” flavors. TweenMax, TweenLite, TimelineLite, and TimelineMax have all been consolidated into a single "gsap" object. So simple! For example: //simple tween like the old TweenMax.to(...) gsap.to(".class", {duration:2, x:100}); //create a timeline and add a tween var tl = gsap.timeline(); tl.to(".class", {duration:2, x:100}); Internally, there's one "Tween" class (replaces TweenLite/TweenMax) and one "Timeline" class (replaces TimelineLite/TimelineMax), and both have all of the features like repeat, yoyo, etc. When you call one of the gsap methods like .to(), .from(), etc., it returns an instance of the appropriate class with easily chainable methods. Duration is now defined in the vars object. This allows several benefits such as: Improved readability It fits much better with keyframes It allows default durations to be inherited (more on that below) You can use function-based values //OLD - duration was 2nd parameter TweenMax.to(".class", 1, {x:100}); //NEW - duration is now a property of the vars object gsap.to(".class", {duration:1, x:100}); All tweens are now stagger-able. There’s no need for the old staggerTo(), staggerFrom(), or staggerFromTo() methods because you can add staggers to regular tweens: //simple stagger gsap.to(".class", { x: "+=100", duration: 1, stagger: 0.5 //space each element's animation out by 0.5 seconds }); //advanced stagger gsap.to(".class", { x: "+=100", duration: 1, stagger: { amount: 2, from: "center", grid: "auto", onComplete: myFunction //define callbacks inside the stagger to make them apply to each sub-tween } }); See the Pen GSAP 3.0 Stagger demo by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. For more information about GSAP’s advanced stagger functionality, see this codepen. New, more compact ease format. less typing, more readable, and zero import hassles. Here's the new convention for all of the standard eases: //old way Elastic.easeOut Elastic.easeIn Elastic.easeInOut Elastic.easeOut.config(1, 0.5) SteppedEase.config(5) //new way "elastic" //same as "elastic.out" "elastic.in" "elastic.inOut" "elastic(1, 0.5)" //same as "elastic.out(1, 0.5)" "steps(5)" Backwards compatible The new GSAP even adjusts itself to accommodate the old syntax! There's technically no more TweenMax, TweenLite, TimelineLite, or TimelineMax, but they're all aliased so that the vast majority of legacy code still works, untouched! You don't have to rewrite all your code for GSAP 3, but we'd recommend shifting to the new, more concise syntax for all your new projects. 3. Inheritance/Defaults You don't have to keep setting the same ease over and over again...or duration...or whatever. Just set defaults on the parent timeline and let them be inherited by all its children! For example this repetitive code can be shortened, saving you time. //old way, without timeline defaults var tl = new TimelineMax(); tl.to(obj1, 2, {ease: Power2.easeInOut, rotation: -180}) .to(obj2, 2, {ease: Power2.easeInOut, rotation: -360}) .to(obj3, 2, {ease: Power2.easeInOut, rotation: -180}); //new way, with timeline defaults var tl = gsap.timeline({defaults:{ease: "power2.inOut", duration: 2}}); tl.to(obj1, {rotation: -180}) //child tweens will inherit the duration and from the parent timeline! .to(obj2, {rotation: -360}) .to(obj1, {rotation: -180}); See the Pen GSAP 3.0 Cube Walk by Pete Barr (@petebarr) on CodePen. Any defaults you set this way will get pushed into every child tween - it’s not limited to a certain subset of properties. This can really save you some typing! Inherited defaults are easily overwritten anytime a property is declared on a child. 4. All new MotionPathPlugin The new MotionPathPlugin makes it very easy to move any element along an SVG <path>! For more information about the MotionPathPlugin, check out its documentation and the video below. See the Pen GSAP 3.0 Stagger demo by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Club GreenSock members also get access to the new MotionPathHelper utility that lets you EDIT the motion path interactively in the browser. It’s never been so easy to move elements along a path! 5. New utility methods GSAP 3 exposes some surprisingly useful utility methods that might save you time and hassle. Need values to snap to the closest one in an array? Use gsap.utils.snap(). Tired of trying to figure out how to pull a random element out of an array? Let gsap.utils.random() do it for you. Want to distribute any value among an array of elements, complete with easing? It’s a piece of cake with gsap.utils.distribute(). Here’s how to use the gsap.utils.interpolate() method: //numbers let value = gsap.utils.interpolate(0, 100, 0.5); // 50 //strings let value = gsap.utils.interpolate("20px", "40px", 0.5); // 30px //colors let value = gsap.utils.interpolate("red", "blue", 0.5); // rgba(128,0,128,1) //objects let value = gsap.utils.interpolate({a:0, b:10, c:"red"}, {a:100, b:20, c:"blue"}, 0.5); // {a: 50, b: 15, c: "rgba(128,0,128,1)"} There's also an explainer video about how to use it. Using GSAP's built in utility functions can make complex code simple. Check out the video below to learn more and see an example: For a full list of the utility functions, some demos, and how to use them, check out the docs. There's waaaaay more... We've only scratched the surface of all the improvements in GSAP 3. Check out the release notes for a full list of the features and changes. There's also an updated getting started page. Ready to play? GSAP 3 Starter Pen (a CodePen template that already has the GSAP 3 files loaded. Fork away and have a blast!) This pen allows you to copy the resource URLs easily. Download the files from your account dashboard - they're in the zip (Including a tarball file that you can "npm install" and test with your build system locally - see the installation docs for more information) We will be featuring the top GSAP 3 demos when it launches along with attribution to the creators. If you create a demo using GSAP 3 that you'd like to submit, please let us know! Questions? Bugs? Hit us up in the forums or contact us directly. We'd love to hear what you think of GSAP 3. Happy tweening!
  2. GreenSock

    GSAP 2.1 Released

    There are plenty of large and small updates in GSAP 2.1; here are a few highlights... Advanced staggers Advanced staggering makes it surprisingly simple to get rich, organic timing effects with very little code. Each tween's start time can be distributed according to any ease and/or based on how close each element is to a position in the list. For example, you can have things emanate outward from the "center" or a certain index. It'll even accommodate grids, complete with auto-calculated columns and rows (great for responsive layouts)! The interactive demo below explains it all visually (notice there's an embedded video explanation too): See the Pen Advanced Staggers in GSAP by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. So setting up an advanced stagger is as simple as: TweenMax.staggerTo(".yourClass", 2, { scale:0.1, y:40, stagger:{ amount: 2, //total seconds to divide up among staggers from: "center", //or an index value. Determines where staggers originate grid:"auto", //or [columns, rows] ease: Power1.easeIn //determines spacing } }); Parts of the advanced staggering features were prompted by suggestions from GSAP users inspired by Julian Garnier's API in anime, so we tip our hat to his efforts. He's a great contributor to the animation community. MorphSVG type:"rotational" There's an entirely new type of morph that leverages rotational and length data to move anchors and control points which can deliver cleaner, more intuitive morphs. Plus it completely eliminates kinks that can occasionally creep in with linear interpolation. The video below explains. Watch the video To tap into this new style of morphing, just set the type:"rotational" TweenMax.to("#shape1", 2, { morphSVG:{ shape:"#shape2", type:"rotational" } }); Or set it as the default to affect all morphs: MorphSVGPlugin.defaultType = "rotational"; //default is "linear" Demo 1: preventing kinks See the Pen MorphSVG type:'rotational' for preventing kinks by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Demo 2: more natural morphs See the Pen MorphSVG type:'rotational' for more natural morphs by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Fixing odd results by declaring a custom origin The default origin is 50% 50% which usually works great, but sometimes the rotations around that point look odd, as shown below. In cases like this, it's best to experiment and set your own custom origin to improve things even more. We created a findMorphOrigin() utility function which is in the codepen below (and you can copy it into your own) which allows you to simply feed in a start and end shape and then it'll superimpose an origin that you can drag around and see exactly how it affects the morph! In the demo below, go into the JS panel and un-comment the findMorphIndex() line and you'll see exactly how this works. Drag the origin around and watch how it affects things. See the Pen MorphSVG: fixing origin weirdness by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Note: you must load Draggable for this to work. So to set a custom origin, it would look like: TweenMax.to("#shape1", 2, { morphSVG:{ shape:"#shape2", type:"rotational", origin:"20% 60%" //or to define a different origin for the start and end shapes, "20% 60%,45% 30%" } }); Is the new type:"rotational" a silver bullet for making every morph perfectly intuitive? No, but it's a great option that delivers more natural morphs in many cases. MorphSVG canvas rendering SVG is fantastic, but sometimes developers have a canvas-based project (often for rendering performance reasons). They haven't been able to leverage the intuitive morphing that MorphSVG provides in a highly-performant way...until now. The new MorphSVG plugin allows you to define a render function that'll be called every time the path updates, and it will receive two parameters: rawPath [array]: A RawPath is essentially an array containing an array for each contiguous segment with alternating x, y, x, y cubic bezier data. It's like an SVG <path> where there's one segment (array) for each "M" command; that segment (array) contains all of the cubic bezier coordinates in alternating x/y format (just like SVG path data) in raw numeric form which is nice because that way you don't have to parse a long string and convert things. For example, this SVG <path> has two separate segments because there are two "M" commands: <path d="M0,0 C10,20,15,30,5,18 M0,100 C50,120,80,110,100,100" /> So the resulting RawPath would be: [ [0, 0, 10, 20, 15, 30, 5, 18], [0, 100, 50, 120, 80, 110, 100, 100] ] For simplicity, the example above only has one cubic bezier in each segment, but there could be an unlimited quantity inside each segment. No matter what path commands are in the original <path> data string (cubic, quadratic, arc, lines, whatever), the resulting RawPath will ALWAYS be cubic beziers. target [object]: the target of the tween (usually a <path>) This means you can even render morphs to super high-performance engines like PixiJS or anything that'll allow you to draw cubic beziers! Demo: MorphSVG canvas rendering See the Pen MorphSVG canvas rendering by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Here's an example of a tween and a render function that'd draw the morphing shape to canvas: var canvas = document.querySelector("canvas"), ctx = canvas.getContext("2d"), vw = canvas.width = window.innerWidth, vh = canvas.height = window.innerHeight; ctx.fillStyle = "#ccc"; TweenMax.to("#hippo", 2, { morphSVG:{ shape:"#circle", render:draw } }); function draw(rawPath, target) { var l, segment, j, i; ctx.clearRect(0, 0, vw, vh); ctx.beginPath(); for (j = 0; j To set a default render method for all tweens: MorphSVGPlugin.defaultRender = yourFunction; Got questions? If you haven't checked out the forums, you're missing out! It's a great place to get your questions answered and participate in the community. We carefully monitor and answer questions there. Changelog View the full changelog here (there's a lot). Happy tweening! DOWNLOAD GSAP NOW
  3. GreenSock

    GSAP JS 1.9.0 Released

    New DirectionalRotationPlugin Have you ever tweened rotation to a particular value but wished that you could control which direction it traveled (clockwise or counter-clockwise)? For example, if the current rotation is 170 and you tween to -170, normally that would travel counter-clockwise -340 degrees but what if you prefer rotating 20 degrees clockwise instead? Or maybe you just want it to go in the shortest direction to that new position (20 degrees in this case). This is all possible now with the DirectionalRotationPlugin. Previously, shortRotation was available in CSSPlugin, but there were three shortcomings (pardon the pun): It always went in the shortest direction - it wasn't possible to define a particular direction (clockwise or counter-clockwise). It required using a different property name ("shortRotation" or "shortRotationX" or "shortRotationY") instead of the regular property name ("rotation" or "rotationX" or "rotationY"). It only worked on DOM elements. What if you have a generic object or an EaselJS Shape (or whatever)? The new DirectionalRotationPlugin solves all of these issues. First of all, its functionality is baked into CSSPlugin, so you don't even need to load the DirectionalRotationPlugin if you're only animating DOM elements. The plugin is also included in TweenMax, so there's no need to load a separate plugin there either. Use the new syntax to get the desired behavior - add one of the following suffixes to the value: "_cw" for clockwise, "_ccw" for counter-clockwise, and "_short" to go whichever direction is shortest. Here are some examples: //tweens to the 270 position in a counter-clockwise direction (notice the value is in quotes) TweenMax.to(element, 1, {rotation:"270_ccw"}); //tweens to the -45 position in a clockwise direction TweenMax.to(element, 1, {rotation:"-45_cw"}); //tweens 1.5 radians more than the current rotationX value, and travels in the shortest direction TweenMax.to(element, 1, {rotationX:"+=1.5rad_short"}); If you're tweening a more generic object (anything that's not a DOM element), you can use the DirectionalRotationPlugin. If you pass in a simple value, it will assume you're attempting to tween the target's "rotation" property but you can tween ANY rotational properties of any name by passing in an object with the appropriate properties. Here are some examples: //start with a generic object with various rotation values var obj = {rotation:45, rotationX:0, rotationY:110}; //tweens rotation to 270 in a clockwise direction TweenLite.to(obj, 1, {directionalRotation:"270_cw"}); //tweens rotationX to -45 in a counter-clockwise direction and rotationY to 200 in a clockwise direction: TweenLite.to(obj, 1, {directionalRotation:{rotationX:"-45_ccw", rotationY:"200_cw"}}); As of 1.9.0, shortRotation is deprecated in favor of this new (more flexible and concise) syntax. New AttrPlugin This plugin allows you to tween any numeric attribute of a DOM element. For example, let's say your DOM element looks like this: <rect id="rect" fill="none" x="0" y="0" width="500" height="400"></rect> You could tween the "x", "y", "width", or "height" attributes using AttrPlugin like this: //tuck any attributes you want to tween into an attr:{} object TweenMax.to("#rect", 1, {attr:{x:100, y:50, width:100, height:100}, ease:Linear.easeNone}); You can tween an unlimited number of attributes simultaneously. Just use the associated property name inside the attr:{} object. The AttrPlugin is included inside the TweenMax JS file, so you don't need to load the plugin separately if you're using TweenMax. New TextPlugin This plugin allows you to tween the text content of a DOM element, replacing it one character at a time (or one word at a time if you set the delimiter to " " (a space) or you can even use a custom delimiter). So when the tween is finished, the DOM element's text has been completely replaced. This also means that if you rewind/restart the tween, the text will be reverted to what it was originally. Here is a simple example of replacing the text in yourElement: //replaces yourElement's text with "This is the new text" over the course of 2 seconds TweenMax.to(yourElement, 2, {text:"This is the new text", ease:Linear.easeNone}); If you'd like to use a different delimiter so that instead of replacing character-by-character, it gets replaced word-by-word, just pass an object with configuration properties like this: //replaces word-by-word because the delimiter is " " (a space) TweenMax.to(yourElement, 2, {text:{value:"This is the new text", delimiter:" "}, ease:Linear.easeNone}); Sometimes it's useful to have the new text differentiated visually from the old text, so TextPlugin allows you to assign a css class to the new and/or old content, like this: //wraps the old text in <span class="class1"></span> and the new text in a <span class="class2"></span> TweenLite.to(yourElement, 2, {text:{value:"This is the new text", newClass:"class2", oldClass:"class1"}, ease:Power2.easeIn}); As indicated, defining a newClass and/or oldClass will result in wrapping a <span> tag around the associated text. The TextPlugin is NOT included inside TweenMax, so you'll need to load it separately. Other updates and enhancements in 1.9.0: Added support for hsl() and hsla() colors in CSSPlugin and ColorPropsPlugin Implemented a new (more concise and clear) way to register plugins. Old plugins will still work fine, but most of the new ones in 1.9.0 use the new style of registering which won't work with old versions of TweenLite/TweenMax. Please just make sure all your files are updated. Fixed issue that caused className to be ignored by the autoCSS feature that creates the css:{} wrapper internally. Fixed issue that could cause em not to be translated to px accurately, causing a jump when the start and end units for the tween don't match (like px to em or visa-versa) Fixed backfaceVisibility so that it is properly prefixed when necessary Now setting "float" on a DOM element will work across browsers including Firefox and IE. Worked around issue that caused x/y/z transforms not to work properly if they exceeded 21,474 (or -21,474). Fixed issue that caused values not to be interpreted correctly if a negative number had a relative prefix, like "+=-50px" or "-=-50px" Fixed issue in EaselPlugin that prevented ColorMatrixFilter tweens from working correctly when the starting matrix wasn't an identity matrix Now fromTo() and staggerFromTo() methods have immediateRender set to true by default, just like from() and staggerFrom() always did. This seems like the preferred behavior for most developers, but you can certainly set immediateRender:false on any tween if you prefer that behavior. Now fromTo() and staggerFromTo() tweens that have immediateRender:false will record their pre-tween values (before even implementing the "from" part of the tween) so that if their parent timeline rewinds past the beginning of the tween, it restores values to their originals. Get it now Download the latest version of GSAP using the fancy new download screen, and notice that everything is also available as CDN links as well. The docs have been updated to reflect all these changes. Questions? Swing by the forums to get your questions answered.
  4. Hello GreenSocks, I cannot get syncing / resetting a draggable to work. Please, see my pen. The red dot is a (Draggable) slider. When user changes number of control points, I remove the transform on the target and call Draggable.update(). But unfortunately, the x property remains the same. Would be great if you could have a look at it! Roelof potatoDie
  5. In my last post on this subject, everything was going swimmingly with the "myImage.load(true);" being introduced to the scenario, when the user gets to the "take a picture" part of the app it works perfectly, they can retake the picture over and over and it loads the new image right away using " Object(root).faceW.myImage.load(true); " from my Camara MC. now my new problem is if they (the user)want to go back and retake the picture after clicking finished(the app at this point has moved the play head to the next frame), the retake button takes back to the frame with the Camara loader but the image is no longer updated after taking any new pictures, only f you quit and restart does the new image load. any ideas on whats happening ? import com.greensock.*;import com.greensock.loading.*; import com.greensock.events.LoaderEvent; import com.greensock.loading.display.*; import flash.filesystem.*; LoaderMax.activate([ImageLoader]); var file:String = "IMG_happy.jpg"; var mypic:File = File.applicationStorageDirectory.resolvePath("Photos/"+file); var myImage:ImageLoader = new ImageLoader(mypic.url,{container:this,x:0,y:0,width:414,height:309,onComplete:onImageLoad}); myImage.load(true); function onImageLoad(event:LoaderEvent):void { TweenLite.from(event.target.content, 1, {alpha:0}); }
  6. Hey there guys! I've spent a good deal of time trying to figure this out - so now I've decided to ask a bit of help. When running and reversing timelines, the properties might change. Is there a way of updating these properties on the fly? I've come up with a small example, check out the codepen! Please let me know if you need me to clarify anything
  7. Hi there, i'm working on a responsive website right now and the issue i'm having implementing greensock to it is when the user resizes the window and a few values like height/width of elements don't get updated unless user refreshes the browser. I was wondering if there's a way to update a few variables everytime the user resizes the window? Cheers, Thales
  8. Can i change the elements of a timeline? I'm removing all canvas elements from #bg1 and then adding new ones. How can i update the existing timeline? var tl = new TimelineMax({paused:true}) .add(new TimelineMax() .staggerFromTo($('#bg1 canvas'), 2, {css: {autoAlpha:1}}, {css: {autoAlpha:0} },.25).duration(0.7) )
  9. Hey guys, I am wondering if there is an easy way to convert a 'classic tween' or 'motion tween' to use the new AS3 TweenLite? Maybe a script of some sort? I have a project that has lots of classic tweens spanned across the timeline. I was hoping for an addon to the right click menu in Flash CS6 like 'Convert classic tween to TweenLite' or something as easy. Forgive me if this has been answered already as I have searched the forums and came up empty. Thanks in advance.
×