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  1. The secret to building gorgeous sequences with precise timing is understanding the position parameter which is used in many methods throughout TimelineLite/Max. This one super-flexible parameter controls the placement of your tweens, labels, callbacks, pauses, and even nested timelines, so you'll be able to literally place anything anywhere in any sequence. Watch the video For a quick overview of the position parameter, check out this video from the "GSAP 3 Express" course by Snorkl.tv - one of the best ways to learn the basics of GSAP 3. Using position with gsap.to() This article will focus on the gsap.to() method for adding tweens to a Tween, but it works the same in other methods like from(), fromTo(), add(), etc. Notice that the position parameter comes after the vars parameter: .to( target, vars, position ) Since it's so common to chain animations one-after-the-other, the default position is "+=0" which just means "at the end", so timeline.to(...).to(...) chains those animations back-to-back. It's fine to omit the position parameter in this case. But what if you want them to overlap, or start at the same time, or have a gap between them? No problem. Multiple behaviors You can define the position in any of the following ways At an absolute time (1) Relative to the end of a timeline allowing for gaps ("+=1") or overlaps ("-=1") At a label ("someLabel") Relative to a label ("someLabel+=1") Relative to the previously added tween ("<" references the most recently-added animation's START time while ">" references the most recently-added animation's END time) Basic code usage tl.to(element, 1, {x: 200}) //1 second after end of timeline (gap) .to(element, {duration: 1, y: 200}, "+=1") //0.5 seconds before end of timeline (overlap) .to(element, {duration: 1, rotation: 360}, "-=0.5") //at exactly 6 seconds from the beginning of the timeline .to(element, {duration: 1, scale: 4}, 6); It can also be used to add tweens at labels or relative to labels //add a label named scene1 at an exact time of 2-seconds into the timeline tl.add("scene1", 2) //add tween at scene1 label .to(element, {duration: 4, x: 200}, "scene1") //add tween 3 seconds after scene1 label .to(element, {duration: 1, opacity: 0}, "scene1+=3"); Sometimes technical explanations and code snippets don't do these things justice. Take a look at the interactive examples below. No position: Direct Sequence If no position parameter is provided, all tweens will run in direct succession. .content .demoBody code.prettyprint, .content .demoBody pre.prettyprint { margin:0; } .content .demoBody pre.prettyprint { width:8380px; } .content .demoBody code, .main-content .demoBody code { background-color:transparent; font-size:18px; line-height:22px; } .demoBody { background-color:#1d1d1d; font-family: 'Signika Negative', sans-serif; color:#989898; font-size:16px; width:838px; margin:auto; } .timelineDemo { margin:auto; background-color:#1d1d1d; width:800px; padding:20px 0; } .demoBody h1, .demoBody h2, .demoBody h3 { margin: 10px 0 10px 0; color:#f3f2ef; } .demoBody h1 { font-size:36px; } .demoBody h2 { font-size:18px; font-weight:300; } .demoBody h3 { font-size:24px; } .demoBody p{ line-height:22px; margin-bottom:16px; width:650px; } .timelineDemo .box { width:50px; height:50px; position:relative; border-radius:6px; margin-bottom:4px; } .timelineDemo .green{ background-color:#6fb936; } .timelineDemo .orange { background-color:#f38630; } .timelineDemo .blue { background-color:#338; } .timleineUI-row{ background-color:#2f2f2f; margin:2px 0; padding:4px 0; } .secondMarker { width:155px; border-left: solid 1px #aaa; display:inline-block; position:relative; line-height:16px; font-size:16px; padding-left:4px; color:#777; } .timelineUI-tween{ position:relative; width:160px; height:16px; border-radius:8px; background: #a0bc58; /* Old browsers */ background: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #a0bc58 0%, #66832f 100%); /* FF3.6+ */ background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, color-stop(0%,#a0bc58), color-stop(100%,#66832f)); /* Chrome,Safari4+ */ background: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, #a0bc58 0%,#66832f 100%); /* Chrome10+,Safari5.1+ */ background: -o-linear-gradient(top, #a0bc58 0%,#66832f 100%); /* Opera 11.10+ */ background: -ms-linear-gradient(top, #a0bc58 0%,#66832f 100%); /* IE10+ */ background: linear-gradient(to bottom, #a0bc58 0%,#66832f 100%); /* W3C */ filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient( startColorstr='#a0bc58', endColorstr='#66832f',GradientType=0 ); /* IE6-9 */ } .timelineUI-dragger-track{ position:relative; width:810px; margin-top:20px; } .timelineUI-dragger{ position:absolute; width:10px; height:100px; top:-20px; } .timelineUI-dragger div{ position:relative; width: 0px; height: 0; border-style: solid; border-width: 20px 10px 0 10px; border-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.4) transparent transparent transparent; left:-10px; } .timelineUI-dragger div::after { content:" "; position:absolute; width:1px; height:95px; top:-1px; left:-1px; border-left: solid 2px rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.4); } .timelineUI-dragger div::before { content:" "; position:absolute; width:20px; height:114px; top:-20px; left:-10px; } .timelineUI-time{ position:relative; font-size:30px; text-align:center; } .controls { margin:10px 2px; } .prettyprint { font-size:20px; line-height:24px; } .timelineUI-button { background: #414141; background-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, #575757, #414141); background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #575757, #414141); background-image: -ms-linear-gradient(top, #575757, #414141); background-image: -o-linear-gradient(top, #575757, #414141); background-image: linear-gradient(to bottom, #575757, #414141); text-shadow: 0px 1px 0px #414141; -webkit-box-shadow: 0px 1px 0px 414141; -moz-box-shadow: 0px 1px 0px 414141; box-shadow: 0px 1px 0px 414141; color: #ffffff; text-decoration: none; margin: 0 auto; -webkit-border-radius: 4; -moz-border-radius: 4; border-radius: 4px; font-family: "Signika Negative", sans-serif; text-transform: uppercase; font-weight: 600; display: table; cursor: pointer; font-size: 13px; line-height: 18px; outline:none; border:none; display:inline-block; padding: 8px 14px;} .timelineUI-button:hover { background: #57a818; background-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, #57a818, #4d9916); background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #57a818, #4d9916); background-image: -ms-linear-gradient(top, #57a818, #4d9916); background-image: -o-linear-gradient(top, #57a818, #4d9916); background-image: linear-gradient(to bottom, #57a818, #4d9916); text-shadow: 0px 1px 0px #32610e; -webkit-box-shadow: 0px 1px 0px fefefe; -moz-box-shadow: 0px 1px 0px fefefe; box-shadow: 0px 1px 0px fefefe; color: #ffffff; text-decoration: none; } .element-box { background: #ffffff; border-radius: 6px; border: 1px solid #cccccc; padding: 17px 26px 17px 26px; font-weight: 400; font-size: 18px; color: #555555; margin-bottom:20px; } .demoBody .prettyprint { min-width:300px; } His animation is a bit out of whack and the client has the following demands for you: Man should start animating 1 second before car animation ends. One second after man animation ends both car and lift should go up simultaneously. For a visual representation of what the finished product should like, here is a .mov and .gif. Alright it's time to put your animation chops to the test. Challenge instructions Visit the editable version of the animation starter file on CodePen. Click the "fork" button to make your own copy. When you're done, tweet the CodePen link to @greensock. We'll make you feel extra special. There are multiple solutions that require only adding the proper position parameters. Some are more flexible than others, but the important part right now is that the end result meets the clients demands. .demoBody { max-width: 94vw; width: 100%; height: auto; overflow: auto; }
  2. GreenSock

    Ease Visualizer

    The ease-y way to find the perfect ease A solid mastery of easing is what separates the top-notch animators from the hacks. Use this tool to play around and understand how various eases "feel". Notice that you can click the underlined words in the code sample at the bottom to make changes. Some eases have special configuration options that open up a world of possibilities. If you need more specifics, head over to the docs. Quick Video Tour of the Ease Visualizer A special thanks to Jamie Barlow who built almost the entire thing. He's one of our all-stars in the forums, lending his wisdom and animation prowess to our whole community. He's a rock star. Take your animations to the next level with CustomEase CustomEase frees you from the limitations of canned easing options; create literally any easing curve imaginable by simply drawing it in the Ease Visualizer or by copying/pasting an SVG path. Zero limitations. Use as many control points as you want. Grab CustomEase below or find out more.
  3. Did you know you can tween a tween? What does that even mean? Well, tweens (and timelines) are JavaScript objects that have their own getter-setter methods that allow you to either get or set values. If you make a tween or timeline the target of a tween you can then tween its progress() and timeScale() just like you would the opacity of a DOM element! The video below explains how this works and also shows you how to tween getter setter methods in your own JavaScript objects. Watch the video Demo 1: Tween progress() See the Pen Tween a tween (video) by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Demo 2: Tween timeScale() See the Pen Tween timeScale() of a Timeline by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen.
  4. Before jumping into Club GreenSock for the super-cool bonus plugins, perhaps you're plagued by questions like: Will the bonus plugins work well for my project? How difficult is the API to work with? Will they play nicely with my other tools? Will they work in Edge? Firefox? ... That's why we created special versions of the plugins that can be used on CodePen anytime...for FREE! The video below shows how to get up and running fast. Video Demo with quick-copy URLs See the Pen Try Club GreenSock Bonus Plugins FREE on Codepen by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Template (fork this): See the Pen GreenSock Bonus Starter Template by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Of course we offer a money-back satisfaction guarantee with Club GreenSock anyway, but hopefully this helps give you even more confidence to sign up. CodePen is an online, browser-based editor that makes it easy to write and share front-end code. If you need help using CodePen check out their interactive editor tour.
  5. This page includes links to all the resources for the 7 Hidden Gems of GSAP article that was published in the June 2016 edition of Net Magazine. To understand the context of all these demos be sure to purchase Net Magazine. Tween a Tween! Huh? Demo: Tween the timeScale() of a timeline Demo: Tween the timeScale() and progress() of a tween Random Access Runtime Controls Demo: Scrub timeline progress Drag and Spin with Draggable Demo: Draggable toss and spin Demo: Puppy Bowl Draggable with SVG Learn more about Draggable Render Anywhere Demo: Same syntax for rendering DOM, SVG and WebGL canvas Expressive Eases Ease Visualizer Demo: Multiple eases Take Control of All GSAP Animations Demo: exportRoot() from Chris Gannon Advanced SVG Shape Morphing Demo: Morph a circle into a hippo Tons of MorphSVG demos from Chris Gannon Learn more about MorphSVGPlugin p, h2 { margin-top: 15px; } .record-content a { display: block; } p a { display: inline; }
  6. GreenSock

    Animating SVG with GSAP

    Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. When it comes to animation, SVG and GSAP go together like peanut butter and jelly. Chocolate and strawberries. Bacon and...anything. SVG offers the sweet taste of tiny file size plus excellent browser support and the ability to scale graphics infinitely without degradation. They're perfect for building a rich, responsive UI (which includes animation, of course). However, just because every major browser offers excellent support for displaying SVG graphics doesn't mean that animating them is easy or consistent. Each browser has its own quirks and implementations of the SVG spec, causing quite a few challenges for animators. For example, some browsers don't support CSS animations on SVG elements. Some don't recognize CSS transforms (rotation, scale, etc.), and implementation of transform-origin is a mess. Don't worry; GSAP smooths out the rough spots and harmonizes behavior across browsers for you. There are quite a few unique features that GSAP offers specifically for SVG animators. Below is a list of common challenges along with GSAP solutions. This page is intended to be a go-to resource for anyone animating SVG with GSAP. Before moving on, make sure you download the latest GSAP. Challenge: scale, rotate, skew, and move using 2D transforms No problem. 2D transforms work exactly like they do on any other DOM element. gsap.to("#gear", {duration: 1, x: 100, y: 100, scale: 0.5, rotation: 180, skewX: 45}); IE and Opera don't honor CSS transforms at all, so GSAP applies these values via the SVG transform attribute like: <g id="gear" transform="matrix(0.5, 0, 0, 0.5, 100, 0)">...</g> When it comes to animating or even setting 2D transforms in IE, CSS simply is not an option. #gear { /* won't work in IE */ transform: translateX(100px) scale(0.5); } Very few JavaScript libraries take this into account, but GSAP handles this for you behind the scenes so you can get amazing results in IE with no extra hassles. Challenge: set the transformOrigin (the point around which rotation and scaling occur) Another unique GSAP feature: use the same syntax you would with normal DOM elements and get the same behavior. For example, to rotate an SVG <rect> that is 100px tall by 100px wide around its center you can do any of the following: gsap.to("rect", {duration: 1, rotation: 360, transformOrigin: "50% 50%"}); //percents gsap.to("rect", {duration: 1, rotation: 360, transformOrigin: "center center"}); //keywords gsap.to("rect", {duration: 1, rotation: 360, transformOrigin: "50px 50px"}); //pixels The demo below shows complete parity between DOM and SVG when setting transformOrigin to various values. We encourage you to test it in all major browsers and devices. See the Pen SVG + CSS Transform Timeline by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. More Details Morph <path> data even if the number (and type) of points is completely different between the start and end shapes! Most other SVG shape morphing tools require that the number of points matches. Morph a <polyline> or <polygon> to a different set of points There's a utility function, MorphSVGPlugin.convertToPath() that can convert primitive shapes like <circle>, <rect>, <ellipse>, <polygon>, <polyline>, and <line> directly into the equivalent <path> that looks identical to the original and is swapped right into the DOM. Optionally define a "shapeIndex" that controls how the points get mapped. This affects what the inbetween state looks like during animation. Instead of passing in raw path data as text, you can simply feed in selector text or an element and the plugin will grab the data it needs from there, making workflow easier. MorphSVGPlugin is a bonus plugin for Club GreenSock members (Shockingly Green and Business Green). Other SVG Gotchas GSAP does a lot to remove the hurdles of animating with SVG, but there are still a few things to keep in mind: The current SVG spec does not account for 3D transforms. Browser support is varied. Best to test thoroughly and have fallbacks in place. There are quite a few browser bugs related to CSS transforms on SVG elements, some of which can interfere with GSAP's ability to animate things properly so we'd strongly recommend only using GSAP to apply transform-related properties like scale, rotation, x, y, etc. In Chrome (at least as of June 2015), getComputedStyle() returns the WRONG transform values on SVG elements. It doesn't recognize any non-identity values. So, for example, if you apply a class to an SVG element and it has transform: scale(0), Chrome will say its computed scale is 1. Doh! The same goes for any transforms - if you rotate or move or whatever in CSS, Chrome reports it as scale:1, rotation:0, translate:0, etc. So when GSAP asks the browser for the current value, it'll get bogus data. In Firefox, if you apply a CSS transform to an SVG element, it overrides any transform that is applied via the transform attribute. So if you inspect the element in Dev Tools, you'll see that GSAP is animating the values perfectly in the SVG's transform attribute, but visually you'll see no changes because the CSS class defines something like transform: scale(0) which takes precedence over the transform attribute. As far as we know, there's no way for GSAP to work around this, so it's best to just avoid defining transforms via CSS and use GSAP directly, like gsap.set(..., {scale: 2, rotation: 30, ...}) Most browsers don't GPU-accelerate SVG elements. GSAP can't change that. SVG is lightweight and resolution-independent, but that also can be costly when it comes to performance because rather than just shoving rasterized pixels around (which GPUs are really good at), browsers have to calculate the geometry/paths on each frame. Flash developers will remember converting vectors to bitmaps using cacheAsBitmap. In Flash Player this led to considerable performance gains. Will be interesting to see if browsers offer developers a similar option. Browser support All SVG features in this article will work in IE9+ (IE8 doesn't support SVG) and all other major desktop and mobile browsers unless otherwise noted. If you find any cross-browser inconsistencies please don't hesitate to let us know in our support forums. Inspiration The SVG Animations collection above is just a small sampling of Chris' work. Be sure to also check out Chris Gannon's full portfolio on CodePen and follow him on Twitter for a steady influx of inspiration. Awesome SVG Resources A Compendium of SVG Information - Chris Coyier Understanding SVG Coordinate Systems and Transformations - Sara Soueidan Weighing SVG Animation Techniques (with Benchmarks) - Sarah Drasner SVG Immersion Podcast - Rob Levin Circulus.svg - Sara Soueidan Making SVGs Responsive with CSS - Sara Soueidan How to Scale SVG - Amelia Bellamy-Royds Transforms on SVG Elements - Ana Tudor Ways to use SVG Sprites in Animation - Sarah Drasner Get Started Quickly with GSAP Below are a few resources that will get you up and running in no time: Getting Started Guide with Video Jump Start Sequence Animations like a Pro (video) GSAP Documentation
  7. This QuickTip focuses on creating staggered animations on multiple objects with TweenMax's power methods staggerFrom() and staggerTo(). TweenMax's stagger methods, tweens an array of targets to a common set of destination values, but staggers their start times by a specified amount of time, creating an evenly-spaced sequence with a surprisingly small amount of code. Watch the video Explore the demo See the Pen gifIe by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Remember to read the TweenMax docs for detailed descriptions of the stagger methods.
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