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Found 147 results

  1. GreenSock

    CSSPlugin

    With the help of the CSSPlugin, GSAP can animate almost any CSS-related property of DOM elements including the obvious things like width, height, margin, padding, top, left, and more plus more interesting things like transforms (rotation, scaleX, scaleY, skewX, skewY, x, y, rotationX, and rotationY), colors, opacity, and lots more. Because animating DOM elements in the browser is so common, GSAP automatically checks to see if the target is a DOM element and if it is (and you haven't already defined a "css" object in the vars parameter), the engine creates that css object for you and shifts any properties that aren't reserved (like onComplete, ease, delay, etc. or plugin keywords like scrollTo, morphSVG, pixi, etc.) into that css object when the tween renders for the first time. We recommend using the more concise style that omits the css:{} object but be aware that either style is acceptable. Learn more in the CSSPlugin documentation.
  2. hi guys, i want to achieve https://dexternavy.com like hover effect. i have tried it using this cdn 'https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/gsap/1.18.0/TweenLite.min.js' but it not work as i thought and i am stuck here. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  3. GreenSock

    PixiPlugin

    PixiJS is a canvas library that can utilize WebGL for insanely fast rendering, plus it has all sorts of crazy filters and fun effects. You could always use GSAP to animate PixiJS objects (after all, GSAP can tween any property of any JS object), but it was a tad cumbersome with certain properties because they're tucked inside sub-objects in PixiJS's API, like object.position.x, object.scale.y, object.skew.x, etc. Plus PixiJS defines rotational values in radians instead of degrees which isn't as intuitive for most developers/designers. PixiPlugin saves you the headaches: //old way (without plugin): gsap.to(pixiObject.scale, {x: 2, y: 1.5}); gsap.to(pixiObject.skew, {x: 30 * Math.PI / 180}); gsap.to(pixiObject, {rotation: 60 * Math.PI / 180}); //new way (with plugin): gsap.to(pixiObject, {pixi:{scaleX: 2, scaleY: 1.5, skewX: 30, rotation: 60}}); PixiJS requires that you define color-related values in a format like 0xFF0000 but with PixiPlugin, you can define them the same way you would in CSS, like "red" | "#F00" | "#FF0000" | "rgb(255,0,0)" | "hsl(0, 100%, 50%)" | 0xFF0000. You can even do relative HSL values! "hsl(+=180, +=0%, +=0%)". Another big convenience is that PixiPlugin recognizes some special values like saturation, brightness, contrast, hue, and colorize (which all leverage a ColorMatrixFilter under the hood). Or if you have a custom ColorMatrixFilter, just pass that in as the colorMatrixFilter property and it'll handle animating between states. Lastly, PixiPlugin recognizes blur, blurX, and blurY properties, so it's very simple to apply a blur without having to create a new BlurFilter instance, add it to the filters array, and animate its properties separately. PixiPlugin significantly improves developer ergonomics for anyone animating in PixiJS. Less code, fewer headaches, and faster production. See the docs for details.
  4. GreenSock

    Physics2DPlugin

    Provides simple physics functionality for tweening an object's x and y coordinates (or "left" and "top") based on a combination of velocity, angle, gravity, acceleration, accelerationAngle, and/or friction. It is not intended to replace a full-blown physics engine and does not offer collision detection, but serves as a way to easily create interesting physics-based effects with the GreenSock animation platform. Parameters are not intended to be dynamically updateable, but one unique convenience is that everything is reverseable. So if you spawn a bunch of particle tweens, for example, and throw them into a timeline, you could simply call reverse() on the timeline to watch the particles retrace their steps right back to the beginning. Keep in mind that any easing equation you define for your tween will be completely ignored for these properties. Usage gsap.to(element, {duration: 2, physics2D: {velocity: 300, angle: -60, acceleration: 50, accelerationAngle: 180}}); See the Pen Physics2D Demo by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Learn more in the Physics2DPlugin documentation.
  5. Sometimes it's useful to tween a value at a particular velocity and/or acceleration without a specific end value in mind. PhysicsPropsPlugin allows you to tween any numeric property of any object based on these concepts. Keep in mind that any easing equation you define for your tween will be completely ignored for these properties. Instead, the physics parameters will determine the movement/easing. These parameters, by the way, are not intended to be dynamically updateable, but one unique convenience is that everything is reverseable. So if you create several physics-based tweens, for example, and throw them into a timeline, you could simply call reverse() on the timeline to watch the objects retrace their steps right back to the beginning. Here are the parameters you can define (note that friction and acceleration are both completely optional): velocity : Number - The initial velocity of the object measured in units per second (or for tweens where useFrames is true, it would be measured per frame). (Default: 0) acceleration : Number - The amount of acceleration applied to the object, measured in units per second (or for tweens where useFrames is true, it would be measured per frame). (Default: 0) friction : Number - A value between 0 and 1 where 0 is no friction, 0.08 is a small amount of friction, and 1 will completely prevent any movement. This is not meant to be precise or scientific in any way, but it serves as an easy way to apply a friction-like physics effect to your tween. Generally it is best to experiment with this number a bit, starting at a very low value like 0.02. Also note that friction requires more processing than physics tweens without any friction. (Default: 0) gsap.to(elem, { duration: 2, physicsProps: { x: {velocity: 100, acceleration: 200}, y: {velocity: -200, friction: 0.1} } });
  6. SplitText is an easy to use JavaScript utility that allows you to split HTML text into characters, words and lines. Its easy to use, extremely flexible and works all the way back to IE9 (IE8 for GSAP 2's version). Although SplitText is naturally a good fit for creating HTML5 text animation effects with GreenSock's animation tools, it has no dependencies on GSAP, jQuery or any other libraries. Note that the video below uses GSAP 2's format. .videoNav { color:#555; margin-top: 12px; } 0:00 Intro 0:21 SplitText solves problems 2:01 Basic Split 3:34 Configuration options 6:35 Animation View the JS panel in the CodePen demo above to see how easy it is to: Split text into words and characters. Pass the chars array into a from() tween for animation. Revert the text back to its pre-split state when you are done animating. Additional features and notes You can specify a new class to be added to each split element and also add an auto-incrementing class like .word1, .word2, .word3 etc. View demo You don't have to manually insert <br>tags, SplitText honors natural line breaks. SplitText doesn't force non-breaking spaces into the divs like many other solutions on the web do. SplitText is not designed to work with SVG <text> nodes. Learn more in our detailed SplitText API documentation. Please visit our SplitText Codepen Collection for more demos of SplitText in action. Where can I get it? SplitText is a membership benefit of Club GreenSock ("Shockingly Green" and "Business Green" levels). Joining Club GreenSock gets you a bunch of other bonus plugins and tools like InertiaPlugin as well, so check out greensock.com/club/ to get details and sign up today. The support of club members has been critical to the success of GreenSock - it's what makes building these tools possible.
  7. GreenSock

    Draggable

    #container { margin:0; padding:0; font-family: Signika Negative, Asap, sans-serif; font-weight: 300; font-size: 17px; line-height: 150%; } #container h1 { font-family: Signika Negative, Asap, sans-serif; font-weight: 300; font-size: 48px; margin: 10px 0 0 0; padding: 0; line-height: 115%; text-shadow: 1px 1px 0 white; } #container h2 { font-family: Signika Negative, Asap, sans-serif; font-weight: normal; font-size:30px; color: #111; margin: 18px 0 0 0; padding: 0; line-height:115%; } #container p { line-height: 150%; color:#555; margin: 0 0 10px 0; } #container a { color:#71b200; } #container .normalBullets code { font-size: inherit; color: inherit; font-weight: normal; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; } #container .normalBullets li strong { font-size: 110%; } #container .normalBullets li { margin-bottom:8px; } #container .blackBG h1, #container .darkBG h1 { color: #ddd; text-shadow: none; } #container .blackBG p { color: #999; } #container .section { width: 100%; text-align: center; position: relative; padding: 20px; } /* .block was causing conflict with wp theme --- renamed below */ #container .customblock { padding: 10px; text-align: left; position: relative; } #container .blackBG { background-color: black; } #container .lightBG { background-color: #e4e4e4; } #container .subtleDark { color: #999; text-shadow: none; } #container .blackBG p strong { color:#ddd; font-weight: normal; } #container .controls { background-color: #222; border: 1px solid #555; color: #bbb; font-size: 18px; } #container .controls ul { list-style: none; padding: 0; margin: 0; } #container .controls li { display: inline-block; padding: 8px 0 8px 10px; margin:0; } /** CODE **/ #container .code { width: 100%; border: 1px solid #555; padding: 0; margin: 20px 0; } #container .code pre.prettyprint { margin:0; overflow: auto; } #container .codeTitle { color: #aaa; background-color: #111; padding: 8px; font-size:18px; border-bottom: 1px solid #555; } #container code, #scroller code { color: black; font-size: 16px; } #container .blackBG code, #container .darkBG code { /* carl removed color: #ccc; */ } #container pre { font-size: 1.1em; padding:8px; background-color:#333; color:white; border: 1px solid #777; } /** TOSS **/ #container .box { background-color: #91e600; text-align: center; font-family: Asap, Avenir, Arial, sans-serif; width: 196px; height: 100px; line-height: 100px; overflow: hidden; color: black; position: absolute; top:0; -webkit-border-radius: 10px; -moz-border-radius: 10px; border-radius: 10px; } /** BUTTONS **/ #container .button { display:inline-block; border-radius:8px; border-bottom-width: 2px; box-shadow: inset 0px 1px 0px rgba(255,255,255,0.6), 0px 3px 6px 0px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.6); cursor:pointer; text-align: center; font-family: Signika Negative, Asap, Avenir, Arial, sans-serif; position:relative; margin: 4px; color:black; } #container .largeButton { padding: 12px 24px; font-size: 20px; margin: 12px 8px; min-width:110px; } .greenGradient { border: 1px solid #6d9a22; background-color: #699a18; background: linear-gradient(to bottom, #8cce1e 0%,#699a18 52%,#639314 53%,#76b016 100%); /* W3C */ text-shadow: 1px 1px 2px #384d16; color:#fff; text-decoration: none; } /** EXPANDABLE POINTS (FAQ) **/ .expPoint, .expList li { list-style: none; line-height: normal; margin: 0 0 0 8px; padding: 6px 4px 4px 24px; position:relative; border: 1px solid rgba(204,204,204,0); font-size: 110%; color: #111; font-weight: normal; } .expPoint, .expContent { font-family: Signika Negative, Asap, sans-serif; font-weight: 300; line-height: 140%; } .expPoint:hover, .expList li:hover { background-color:white; border: 1px solid rgb(216,216,216); } .expContent { height: 0; overflow: hidden; color: #444; margin: 2px 0 0 0; padding-top: 0; font-size:16px; } .expMore { color: #71b200; text-decoration: underline; font-size:0.8em; } .arrow-right { width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 5px solid transparent; border-bottom: 5px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #999; display:inline-block; margin: -4px 8px 0 -14px; vertical-align: middle; opacity:0.8; } .tableCellDesktop { display: table-cell; } .tableCellDesktop img { left: 120px; } @media screen and (max-width: 860px) { .tableCellDesktop { display: block; } .tableCellDesktop img { left: 0px; } } Features Touch enabled - works great on tablets, phones, and desktop browsers. Incredibly smooth - GPU-accelerated and requestAnimationFrame-driven for ultimate performance. Compared to other options out there, Draggable just feels far more natural and fluid, particularly when imposing bounds and momentum. Momentum-based animation - if you have InertiaPlugin loaded, you can simply set inertia: true in the config object and it'll automatically apply natural, momentum-based movement after the mouse/touch is released, causing the object to glide gracefully to a stop. You can even control the amount of resistance, maximum or minimum duration, etc. Complex snapping made easy - snap to points within a certain radius (see example), or feed in an array of values and it'll select the closest one, or implement your own custom logic in a function. Ultimate flexibility. You can have things live-snap (while dragging) or only on release (even with momentum applied, thanks to InertiaPlugin)! Impose bounds - tell a draggable element to stay within the bounds of another DOM element (a container) as in bounds:"#container" or define bounds as coordinates like bounds:{top:100, left:0, width:1000, height:800} or specific maximum/minimum values like bounds:{minRotation:0, maxRotation:270}. Sense overlaps with hitTest() - see if one element is overlapping another and even set a tolerance threshold (like at least 20 pixels or 25% of either element's total surface area) using the super-flexible Draggable.hitTest() method. Feed it a mouse event and it'll tell you if the mouse is over the element. See http://codepen.io/GreenSock/pen/GFBvn for a simple example. Define a trigger element - maybe you want only a certain area to trigger the dragging (like the top bar of a window) - it's as simple as trigger:"#topBar", for example. Drag position, rotation, or scroll - lots of drag types to choose from: "x,y" | "top,left" | "rotation" | "scroll" | "x" | "y" | "top" | "left" | "scrollTop" | "scrollLeft" Lock movement along a certain axis - set lockAxis:true and Draggable will watch the direction the user starts to drag and then restrict it to that axis. Or if you only want to allow vertical or horizontal movement, that's easy too using the type ("top", "y" or "scrollTop" only allow vertical movement; "x", "left", or "scrollLeft" only allow horizontal movement). Rotation honors transform origin - by default, spinnable elements will rotate around their center, but you can set transformOrigin to something else to make the pivot point be elsewhere. For example, if you call gsap.set(yourElement, {transformOrigin:"top left"}) before dragging, it will rotate around its top left corner. Or use % or px. Whatever is set in the element's css will be honored. Rich callback system and event dispatching - you can use any of the following callbacks: onPress, onDragStart, onDrag, onDragEnd, onRelease,, onLockAxis, and onClick. Inside the callbacks, "this" refers to the Draggable instance itself, so you can easily access its "target" or bounds, etc. If you prefer event listeners instead, Draggable dispatches events too so you can do things likeyourDraggable.addEventListener("dragend", yourFunc); Works great with SVG Even works in transformed containers! Got a Draggable inside a rotated/scaled container? No problem. No other tool handles this properly that we've seen. Auto-scrolling, even in multiple containers - set autoScroll:1 for normal-speed auto scrolling, or autoScroll:2 would scroll twice as fast, etc. The closer you move toward the edge, the faster scrolling gets. See a demo here (added in version 0.12.0) Sense clicks when the element moves less than 3 pixels - a common challenge is figuring out when a user is trying to click/tap an object rather than drag it, so if the mouse/touch moves less than 3 pixels from its starting position, it will be interpreted as a "click" and the onClick callback will be called (and a "click" event dispatched) without actually moving the element. You can define a different threshold using minimumMovement config property, like minimumMovement:6 for 6 pixels. All major browsers are supported including IE9+. IE8 lacks hitTest() support. See full documentation here. See our Codepen Draggable Collection here. To get InertiaPlugin (for the momentum-based features), join Club GreenSock today. You'll be glad you did. If not, we'll gladly issue a full refund.
  8. GreenSock

    DrawSVGPlugin

    DrawSVGPlugin allows you to progressively reveal (or hide) the stroke of an SVG <path>, <line>, <polyline>, <polygon>, <rect>, or <ellipse> and you can even animate outward from the center of the stroke (or any position/segment). It does this by controlling the stroke-dashoffset and stroke-dasharray CSS properties. Watch the video The video below illustrates the many ways DrawSVGPlugin can be used and will get you up and running fast. Note that it uses GSAP 2 formatting. Demo Click through the demo below to see the various ways you can provide values to DrawSVGPlugin. See the Pen DrawSVGPlugin Values: carl click next by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. More details For more detailed usage notes please consult the DrawSVGPlugin API documentation. The docs are loaded with tons of info that will help you get the most out of DrawSVGPlugin. Get your hands on DrawSVGPlugin DrawSVGPlugin is a bonus plugin for all Club GreenSock members. It's our way of saying "Thank you" to those that are fueling innovation at GreenSock. To download DrawSVGPlugin, just log into your account dashboard and grab the latest version of GSAP. Try DrawSVGPlugin for free on CodePen! There's a special [fully-functional] version of DrawSVGPlugin that we link to in our DrawSVGPlugin CodePens, so feel free to fork any of them, add your own SVG graphics, and take DrawSVGPlugin for a spin. CodePen is a fantastic way to experiment. We highly recommend it. Note: the special version of the plugin will only work on the CodePen domain. To find out more about the many benefits of being a Club GreenSock member swing on by the club page and be sure to check out the other premium plugins.
  9. Hi everyone, I just learned to make animation website and join in greensock. I'm trying to learn to create a website using the exact same background effect as the one implemented on this website, http://thegigi.it/ in this website using a plus sign in the background and follow the direction of the mouse, I've asked in some forums and finally found the answer using tweenmax. Please guide me how can i achieve the same background effect? thankyou.
  10. GreenSock

    TweenMax

    Note: TweenMax has been deprecated in GSAP 3 in favor of the streamlined gsap object. It has 50+ new features and is almost <strong>half the size!</strong> GSAP 3 is backward compatible with the vast majority of GSAP 2 features including TweenMax. Please see the Migration Guide for details. TweenMax lets you animate literally any property of any object that JavaScript can touch (CSS, SVG, React, Vue, Three.js, canvas, motion paths, generic objects, etc.). Before the release of GSAP 3, TweenMax was the most feature-packed (and popular) animation tool in the GSAP arsenal. However in GSAP 3, you no longer even need to reference TweenMax in your code (although you can because GSAP 3 honors the vast majority of legacy code). We strongly recommend migrating to GSAP 3's streamlined syntax. Quick links Getting started What's so special about GSAP? Documentation: Version 2 | Version 3 Showcase (examples) For convenience and loading efficiency, TweenMax version 2 and earlier included TweenLite, TimelineLite, TimelineMax, CSSPlugin, AttrPlugin, RoundPropsPlugin, BezierPlugin, and EasePack (all in one file). Every bit of that functionality (plus a lot more) is in the GSAP 3 core which is almost half the size. Staggered animations GSAP makes it easy to create staggered animations on multiple objects. The animations can overlap, run in direct sequence or have gaps between their start times. The old TweenMax stagger methods (from version 1 and 2): TweenMax.staggerTo(), TweenMax.staggerFrom() and TweenMax.staggerFromTo() aren't even necessary in GSAP 3 because a "stagger" special property can be added to ANY tween, like in the demo below: Additional Methods (only relevant for version 1 and 2) TweenMax inherits methods from TweenLite and it also has quite a few of its own. ul.chart {width:300px; float:left; margin-right:80px; } ul.chart li:nth-child(1){ font-weight:bold; list-style:none; margin-left:-20px; font-size:20px; margin-bottom:20px; } TweenLite and TweenMax Methods delay() delayedCall() duration() eventCallback from() fromTo() getTweensOf() invalidate() isActive() kill() killDelayedCallsTo() killTweensOf() pause() paused() play() progress() restart() resume() reverse() reversed() seek() set() startTime() time() timeScale() to() totalDuration() totalProgress() totalTime() Methods exclusive to TweenMax getAllTweens() isTweening() killAll() killChildTweensOf() pauseAll() repeat() repeatDelay() resumeAll() staggerFrom() staggerFromTo() staggerTo() updateTo() yoyo() Learn more in the TweenMax version 2 documentation.
  11. GreenSock

    CustomEase

    CSS animations and WAAPI offer cubic-bezier() which is great but with only two control points it's impossible to create more complex effects like bouncing, elastic, wiggles, rough/jerky eases, etc. Plus you can't make an ease return to its starting values (like a ball jumping into the air and falling back to the ground with a bounce). Features Unlimited anchors and control points. Copy/Paste any SVG <path> (including directly from Adobe Illustrator). Use CSS cubic-bezier() values (For example, from cubic-bezier.com). Editor has snapping, undo, sample code and other conveniences. Start with any standard ease and customize it. getSVGData() method turns any ease into SVG <path> data for display at the size you define. Extremely optimized for runtime performance. Free for anyone with a GreenSock account. Reading Ease Curves, Editing, and Using CustomEase Here's an in-depth video tour that'll get you up to speed with exactly how to use CustomEase (note that the video is using GSAP 2 format): Ready to play? Check out the new Ease Visualizer with CustomEase support. Edit the curve as much as you want: Download CustomEase Get CustomEase by creating a FREE GreenSock account which gets you access to our community forums plus you’ll receive our exclusive “GreenSock Insider” email series (you can unsubscribe anytime). Make sure you're logged in, then you’ll get immediately gain access to the download zip containing CustomEase. Note: CustomEase is not in the GitHub repository or CDN; it's only available for download at GreenSock.com. Download GSAP (ZIP)
  12. Hi. I'm looking for feedback on my new project, here is a little background on how it became. My clients sometimes send me an already working preview for the animation they have. They either want a creative update or a different size banner. To match the timing as close as possible, I usually record the animation as mp4 and then using a video player with pause/play extract necessary time keys. To simplify this, I created a tool that records the video for me. Just pass the URL get back the mp4 video. I thought it could also be used to export the animation (html5, index.html, zip package) as an mp4 and then used as a video advertisement on FB or Instagram,... https://urlrec.com/ Any feedback on your workflow and if this is something you would use would be excellent.
  13. Note: This plugin was removed from GSAP 3. However, you can register this unofficial plugin to get the effect back. Tweens any rotation-related property to another value in a particular direction which can be either clockwise ("_cw" suffix), counter-clockwise ("_ccw" suffix), or in the shortest direction ("_short" suffix) in which case the plugin chooses the direction for you based on the shortest path. For example: //obj.rotation starts at 45 var obj = {rotation:45}; // In GSAP 3 directionalRotation is built in): //tweens to the 270 position in a clockwise direction gsap.to(obj, {duration: 1, directionalRotation: {rotation: "270_cw"}}); //tweens to the 270 position in a counter-clockwise direction gsap.to(obj, {duration: 1, directionalRotation: {rotation: "270_ccw"}}); //tweens to the 270 position in the shortest direction (which, in this case, is counter-clockwise) gsap.to(obj, {duration: 1, directionalRotation: {rotation:"270_short"}}); // In GSAP 2 (directionRotation is an external plugin): //tweens to the 270 position in a clockwise direction TweenLite.to(obj, 1, {directionalRotation:"270_cw"}); //tweens to the 270 position in a counter-clockwise direction TweenLite.to(obj, 1, {directionalRotation:"270_ccw"}); //tweens to the 270 position in the shortest direction (which, in this case, is counter-clockwise) TweenLite.to(obj, 1, {directionalRotation:"270_short"}); We used rotation here but it could be anything, like newRot.x. Notice that the value is in quotes, thus a string with a particular suffix indicating the direction ("_cw", "_ccw", or "_short"). You can also use the "+=" or "-=" prefix to indicate relative values.
  14. GreenSock

    CSSRulePlugin

    Allows GSAP to animate the raw style sheet rules which affect all objects of a particular selector rather than affecting an individual DOM element's style (that's what the CSSPlugin is for). For example, if you have a CSS class named ".myClass" that sets background-color to "#FF0000", you could tween that to a different color and ALL of the objects on the page that use ".myClass" would have their background color change. Typically it is best to use the regular CSSPlugin to animate css-related properties of individual elements so that you can get very precise control over each object, but sometimes it can be useful to tween the global rules themselves instead. For example, pseudo elements (like :after, :before, etc. are impossible to reference directly in JavaScript, but you can animate them using CSSRulePlugin as shown below. See the Pen CSSRulePlugin by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Learn more in the CSSRulePlugin documentation.
  15. GreenSock

    EaselPlugin

    Tweens special EaselJS-related properties for things like saturation, contrast, tint, colorize, brightness, exposure, and hue which leverage EaselJS's ColorFilter and ColorMatrixFilter (see http://www.createjs.com/#!/EaselJS for more information about EaselJS). Of course you don't need the plugin to tween normal numeric properties of EaselJS objects (like x and y), but some filters or effects require special manipulation which is what EaselPlugin is for. Currently it only handles special properties related to ColorFilter and ColorMatrixFilter, and it can tween the "frame" property of a MovieClip. GreenSock's EaselPlugin exposes convenient properties that aren't a part of EaselJS's API like "tint", "tintAmount", "exposure", and "brightness" for ColorFilter, as well as "saturation", "hue", "contrast", "colorize", and "colorizeAmount" for ColorMatrixFilter. Learn more in the EaselPlugin documentation.
  16. GreenSock

    BezierPlugin

    Note: This plugin was replaced with MotionPathPlugin in GSAP 3. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Animate virtually any property (or properties) along a curved Bezier path which you define as an array of points/values that can be interpreted 4 different ways (described as the Bezier's "type", like type:"soft"? "thru" (the default) - the plugin figures out how to draw the Bezier naturally through the supplied values using a proprietary algorithm. The values you provide in the array are essentially treated as anchors on the Bezier and the plugin calculates the control points. The target's current/starting values are used as the initial anchor. You can define a curviness special property that allows you to adjust the tension on the Bezier where 0 has no curviness (straight lines), 1 is normal curviness, 2 is twice the normal curviness, etc. Since "thru" is the default Bezier type, you don't need to define a type at all if this is the one you want. "soft" - the values that you provide in the array act almost like magnets that attract the curve towards them, but the Bezier doesn't typically travel through them. They are treated as control points on a Quadratic Bezier and the plugin creates the necessary intermediate anchors. The target's current/starting values are used as the initial anchor. "quadratic" - allows you to define standard Quadratic Bezier data (Quadratic Beziers have 1 control point between each anchor). The array should start with the first anchor, then control point, then anchor, control point, etc. for as many iterations as you want, but obviously make sure that it starts and ends with anchors. "cubic" - allows you to define standard Cubic Bezier data (Cubic Beziers have 2 control points between each anchor). The array should start with the first anchor, then 2 control points, then anchor, 2 control points, anchor, etc. for as many iterations as you want, but obviously make sure that it starts and ends with anchors. For full details please consult the BezierPlugin documentation.
  17. GreenSock

    RoundPropsPlugin

    Note: This plugin was replaced by SnapPlugin in GSAP 3. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. If you'd like the inbetween values in a tween to always get rounded to the nearest integer, use the roundProps special property. Just pass in a comma-delimited String containing the property names that you'd like rounded. For example, if you're tweening the x, y, and alpha properties of mc and you want to round the x and y values (not alpha) every time the tween is rendered, you'd do: TweenMax.to(element, 2, {x:300, y:200, alpha:0.5, roundProps:"x,y"});
  18. Scrambles the text in a DOM element with randomized characters (uppercase by default, but you can define lowercase or a set of custom characters), refreshing new randomized characters at regular intervals while gradually revealing your new text (or the original text) over the course of the tween (left to right). Visually it looks like a computer decoding a string of text. Great for rollovers. See the Pen GSAP Scramble Text Plugin - feature plugin page by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. You can simply pass a string of text directly as the scrambleText and it'll use the defaults for revealing it, or you can customize the settings by using a generic object with any of the following properties: text : String - The text that should replace the existing text in the DOM element. If omitted (or if "{original}"), the original text will be used. chars : String - The characters that should be randomly swapped in to the scrambled portion the text. You can use "upperCase", "lowerCase", "upperAndLowerCase", or a custom string of characters, like "XO" or "TMOWACB", or "jompaWB!^", etc. (Default: "upperCase") tweenLength : Boolean - If the length of the replacement text is different than the original text, the difference will be gradually tweened so that the length doesn't suddenly jump. For example, if the original text is 50 characters and the replacement text is 100 characters, during the tween the number of characters would gradually move from 50 to 100 instead of jumping immediatley to 100. However, if you'd prefer to have it immediately jump, set tweenLength to false. (Default: true) revealDelay : Number - If you'd like the reveal (unscrambling) of the new text to be delayed for a certain portion of the tween so that the scrambled text is entirely visible for a while, use revealDelay to define the time you'd like to elapse before the reveal begins. For example, if the tween's duration is 3 seconds but you'd like the scrambled text to remain entirely visible for first 1 second of the tween, you'd set revealDelay to 1. (Default: 0) newClass : String - If you'd like the new text to have a particular class applied (using a <span> tag wrapped around it), use newClass:"YOUR_CLASS_NAME". This makes it easy to create a distinct look for the new text. (Default: null) oldClass : String - If you'd like the old (original) text to have a particular class applied (using a <span> tag wrapped around it), use oldClass:"YOUR_CLASS_NAME". This makes it easy to create a distinct look for the old text. (Default: null) speed : Number - Controls how frequently the scrambled characters are refreshed. The default is 1 but you could slow things down by using 0.2 for example (or any number). (Default: 1) delimiter : String - By default, each character is replaced one-by-one, but if you'd prefer to have things revealed word-by-word, you could use a delimiter of " " (space). (Default: "") //use the defaults gsap.to(element, {duration: 1, scrambleText:"THIS IS NEW TEXT"}); //or customize things: gsap.to(element, {duration: 1, scrambleText:{text:"THIS IS NEW TEXT", chars:"XO", revealDelay:0.5, speed:0.3, newClass:"myClass"}});
  19. GreenSock

    ScrollToPlugin

    Allows GSAP to animate the scroll position of the window (like doing window.scrollTo(x, y)) or a <div> DOM element (like doing myDiv.scrollTop = y; myDiv.scrollLeft = x;). To scroll the window to a particular position, use window as the target of the tween like this: //scroll to 400 pixels down from the top gsap.to(window, {duration: 2, scrollTo: 400}); //or to scroll to the element with the ID "#someID": gsap.to(window, {duration: 2, scrollTo:"#someID"}); //or to specify which axis (x or y), use the object syntax: gsap.to(window, {duration: 2, scrollTo: {y: 400, x: 250}}); Or to tween the content of a div, make sure you've set the overflow:scroll on the div and then do this: //scroll to 250 pixels down from the top of the content in the div gsap.to(myDiv, {duration: 2, scrollTo: 250}); Learn more in the ScrollToPlugin documentation.
  20. GreenSock

    CustomBounce

    GSAP always had the tried-and-true "bounce" ease, but there was no way to customize how "bouncy" it was, nor could you get a synchronized squash and stretch effect during the bounce because: The "bounce" ease needs to stick to the ground momentarily at the point of the bounce while the squashing occurs. Bounce.easeOut offers no such customization. There was no way to create the corresponding [synchronized] scaleX/scaleY ease for the squashing/stretching. CustomEase solves this now, but it'd still be very difficult to manually draw that ease with all the points lined up in the right spots to match up with the bounces. With CustomBounce, you can set a few parameters and it'll create BOTH CustomEases for you (one for the bounce, and one [optionally] for the squash/stretch). Think of CustomBounce like a wrapper that creates a CustomEase under the hood based on the variables you pass in. Note that this video uses GSAP 2's format. Options strength (Number) - A number between 0 and 1 that determines how "bouncy" the ease is, so 0.9 will have a lot more bounces than 0.3. Default: 0.7 endAtStart (Boolean) - If true, the ease will end back where it started, allowing you to get an effect like an object sitting on the ground, leaping into the air, and bouncing back down to a stop. Default: false squash (Number) - Controls how long the squash should last (the gap between bounces, when it appears "stuck"). Typically 2 is a good number, but 4 (as an example) would make the squash longer in relation to the rest of the ease. Default: 0 squashID (String) - The ID that should be assigned to the squash ease. The default is whatever the ID of the bounce is plus "-squash" appended to the end. For example, CustomBounce.create("hop", {strength:0.6, squash:2}) would default to a squash ease ID of "hop-squash". How do you get the bounce and the squash/stretch to work together? You'd use two tweens; one for the position ("y"), and the other for the scaleX/scaleY, with both running at the same time: //Create a custom bounce ease: CustomBounce.create("myBounce", {strength:0.6, squash:3, squashID:"myBounce-squash"}); //do the bounce by affecting the "y" property. gsap.from(".class", {duration: 2, y:-200, ease:"myBounce"}); //and do the squash/stretch at the same time: gsap.to(".class", {duration: 2, scaleX:140, scaleY:60, ease:"myBounce-squash", transformOrigin:"center bottom"}); See the Pen CustomBounce from GreenSock by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Download CustomBounce Get CustomBounce by creating a FREE GreenSock account which gets you access to our community forums plus you’ll receive our exclusive “GreenSock Insider” email series (you can unsubscribe anytime). Use the widget below to sign up (or if you’re already logged in, you’ll get immediate access to the download zip containing CustomBounce). Note: CustomBounce is not in the GitHub repository or CDN; it's only available for download at GreenSock.com.
  21. GreenSock

    CustomWiggle

    CustomWiggle extends CustomEase (think of it like a wrapper that creates a CustomEase under the hood based on the variables you pass in), allowing you to not only set the number of wiggles, but also the type of wiggle (there are 5 types; see demo below). Advanced users can even alter the plotting of the wiggle curves along either axis using amplitudeEase and timingEase special properties. Note that the video is using GSAP 2 format. Demo: CustomWiggle Types See the Pen CustomWiggle Demo : resized by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Options wiggles (Integer) - Number of oscillations back and forth. Default: 10 type (String) "easeOut" | "easeInOut" | "anticipate" | "uniform" | "random" - tThe type (or style) of wiggle (see demo above). Default: "easeOut" amplitudeEase (Ease) - Provides advanced control over the shape of the amplitude (y-axis in the ease visualizer). You define an ease that controls the amplitude's progress from 1 toward 0 over the course of the tween. Defining an amplitudeEase (or timingEase) will override the "type" (think of the 5 "types" as convenient presets for amplitudeEase and timingEase combinations). See the example codepen to play around and visualize how it works. timingEase (Ease) - Provides advanced control over how the waves are plotted over time (x-axis in the ease visualizer). Defining an timingEase (or amplitudeEase) will override the "type" (think of the 5 "types" as convenient presets for amplitudeEase and timingEase combinations). See the example CodePen to play around and visualize how it works. How do you control the strength of the wiggle (or how far it goes)? Simply by setting the tween property values themselves. For example, a wiggle to rotation:30 would be stronger than rotation:10. Remember, and ease just controls the ratio of movement toward whatever value you supply for each property in your tween. Sample code //Create a wiggle with 6 oscillations (default type:"easeOut") CustomWiggle.create("myWiggle", {wiggles:6}); //now use it in an ease. "rotation" will wiggle to 30 and back just as much in the opposite direction, ending where it began. gsap.to(".class", {duration: 2, rotation:30, ease:"myWiggle"}); //Create a 10-wiggle anticipation ease: CustomWiggle.create("funWiggle", {wiggles:10, type:"anticipate"}); gsap.to(".class", {duration: 2, rotation:30, ease:"funWiggle"}); Wiggling isn't just for "rotation"; you can use it for any property. For example, you could create a swarm effect by using just 2 randomized wiggle tweens on "x" and "y", as demonstrated here. Download CustomWiggle Get CustomWiggle by creating a FREE GreenSock account which gets you access to our community forums plus you’ll receive our exclusive “GreenSock Insider” email series (you can unsubscribe anytime). Use the widget below to sign up (or if you’re already logged in, you’ll get immediate access to the download zip containing CustomWiggle). Note: CustomWiggle is not in the GitHub repository or CDN; it's only available for download at GreenSock.com.
  22. GreenSock

    TimelineMax

    Note: TimelineMax has been deprecated in GSAP 3 (but GSAP 3 is still compatible with TimelineMax). We highly recommend using the gsap.timeline() object instead. While GSAP 3 is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. TimelineMax extends TimelineLite, offering exactly the same functionality plus useful (but non-essential) features like repeat, repeatDelay, yoyo, currentLabel(), tweenTo(), tweenFromTo(), getLabelAfter(), getLabelBefore(), getActive() (and probably more in the future). It is the ultimate sequencing tool that acts like a container for tweens and other timelines, making it simple to control them as a whole and precisely manage their timing. Its easy to make complex sequences repeat with TimelineMax and there are plenty of methods and events that give you complete access to all aspects of your animation as shown in the demo below. See the Pen Burger Boy Finished / TimelineMax page by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Interesting note: The animation in the banner above is a mere 11 lines of TimelineMax code. The next demo illustrates many of the things TimelineLite and TimelineMax handle with ease, such as the ability to: insert multiple tweens with overlapping start times into a timeline create randomized bezier tweens control the entire set of tweens with a basic UI slider repeat the animation any number of times dynamically adjust the speed at runtime. Notice how the play / pause buttons smoothly accelerate and deccelerate? See the Pen Burger Boy Finished / TimelineMax page by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen Be sure to check out TimelineLite for more info on all the capabilities TimelineMax inherits. The chart below gives a birds-eye look at the methods these tools provide. ul.chart { width:360px; float:left; margin-right:30px; } ul.chart li:nth-child(1){ font-weight:700; list-style:none; margin-left:-20px; font-size:20px; margin-bottom:20px; } TimelineLite and TimelineMax Methods add() addLabel() addPause() call() clear() delay() duration() eventCallback exportRoot() from() fromTo() getChildren() getLabelTime() getTweensOf() invalidate() isActive() kill() pause() paused() play() progress() remove() removeLabel() render() restart() resume() reverse() reversed() seek() set() shiftChildren() staggerFrom() staggerFromTo() staggerTo() startTime() time() timeScale() to() totalDuration() totalProgress() totalTime() useFrames() Methods exclusive to TimelineMax currentLabel() getActive() getLabelAfter() getLabelBefore() getlLabelsArray() repeat() repeatDelay() tweenFromTo() tweenTo() yoyo()
  23. GreenSock

    TimelineLite

    Note: TimelineLite has been deprecated in GSAP 3 (but GSAP 3 is still compatible with TimelineLite). We highly recommend using the gsap.timeline() object instead. While GSAP 3 is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. TimelineLite is a lightweight, intuitive timeline class for building and managing sequences of TweenLite, TweenMax, TimelineLite, and/or TimelineMax instances. You can think of a TimelineLite instance like a container where you place tweens (or other timelines) over the course of time. build sequences easily by adding tweens with methods like to(), from(), staggerFrom(), add(), and more. tweens can overlap as much as you want and you have complete control over where they get placed on the timeline. add labels, play(), stop(), seek(), restart(), and even reverse() smoothly anytime. nest timelines within timelines as deeply as you want. set the progress of the timeline using its progress() method. For example, to skip to the halfway point, set myTimeline.progress(0.5); tween the time() or progress() values to fastforward/rewind the timeline. You could even attach a slider to one of these properties to give the user the ability to drag forwards/backwards through the timeline. speed up or slow down the entire timeline using timeScale(). You can even tween this property to gradually speed up or slow down. add onComplete, onStart, onUpdate, and/or onReverseComplete callbacks using the constructor’s vars object. use the powerful add() method to add labels, callbacks, tweens and timelines to a timeline. base the timing on frames instead of seconds if you prefer. Please note, however, that the timeline’s timing mode dictates its childrens’ timing mode as well. kill the tweens of a particular object with killTweensOf() or get the tweens of an object with getTweensOf() or get all the tweens/timelines in the timeline with getChildren() If you need even more features like, repeat(), repeatDelay(), yoyo(), currentLabel(), getLabelsArray(), getLabelAfter(), getLabelBefore(), getActive(), tweenTo() and more, check out TimelineMax which extends TimelineLite. Sample Code //instantiate a TimelineLite var tl = new TimelineLite(); //add a from() tween at the beginning of the timline tl.from(head, 0.5, {left:100, opacity:0}); //add another tween immediately after tl.from(subhead, 0.5, {left:-100, opacity:0}); //use position parameter "+=0.5" to schedule next tween 0.5 seconds after previous tweens end tl.from(feature, 0.5, {scale:.5, autoAlpha:0}, "+=0.5"); //use position parameter "-=0.5" to schedule next tween 0.25 seconds before previous tweens end. //great for overlapping tl.from(description, 0.5, {left:100, autoAlpha:0}, "-=0.25"); //add a label 0.5 seconds later to mark the placement of the next tween tl.add("stagger", "+=0.5") //to jump to this label use: tl.play("stagger"); //stagger the animation of all icons with 0.1s between each tween's start time //this tween is added tl.staggerFrom(icons, 0.2, {scale:0, autoAlpha:0}, 0.1, "stagger"); Demo See the Pen TimelineLite Control : new GS.com by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Watch The video below will walk you through the types of problems TimelineLite solves and illustrate the flexibility and power of our core sequencing tool. Learn more in the TimelineLite docs. For even more sequencing power and control take a look at TimelineMax.
  24. GreenSock

    TweenLite

    Note: TweenLite has been deprecated in GSAP 3 in favor of the streamlined gsap object. It has 50+ new features and is almost <strong>half the size!</strong> GSAP 3 is backward compatible with the vast majority of GSAP 2 features including TweenLite. Please see the Migration Guide for details. The information below covers the older version 2... TweenLite is an extremely fast, lightweight, and flexible animation tool that serves as the foundation of the GreenSock Animation Platform (GSAP). A TweenLite instance handles tweening one or more properties of any object (or array of objects) over time. TweenLite can be used on its own to accomplish most animation chores with minimal file size or it can be used in conjunction with advanced sequencing tools like TimelineLite or TimelineMax to make complex tasks much simpler. Basic Usage The most basic use of TweenLite would be to tween a numeric property of a generic JavaScript object. var demo = {score:0}, scoreDisplay = document.getElementById("scoreDisplay"); //create a tween that changes the value of the score property of the demo object from 0 to 100 over the course of 20 seconds. //each time the tween updates call the function showScore() which will handle displaying the value of demo.score. var tween = TweenLite.to(demo, 20, {score:100, onUpdate:showScore}) function showScore() { scoreDisplay.innerHTML = demo.score.toFixed(2); } See the Pen TweenLite Tween Numeric Property by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. note: Click on the "Result" tab to see the value of score animate. Animate CSS Properties For most HTML5 projects you will probably want to animate DOM elements. No problem. Once you load CSSPlugin TweenLite can easily animate CSS properties of DOM elements. /*external js http://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/gsap/2.1.3/TweenLite.min.js http://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/gsap/2.1.3/plugins/CSSPlugin.min.js */ window.onload = function() { var logo = document.getElementById("logo"); TweenLite.to(logo, 2, {left:"542px", backgroundColor:"black", borderBottomColor:"#90e500", color:"white"}); } See the Pen Animate Multiple Properties by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. note: Click on the "Result" tab to see the animation. TweenLite isn't limited to animating DOM elements, in fact it isn't tied to any rendering layer. It works great with canvas and WebGL too! Control TweenLite is packed with methods that give you precise control over every tween. Play, pause, reverse, and adjust the timeScale (speed) whenever you need to. The demo below shows the power of just a handful of TweenLite's methods. See the Pen Control Playback by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. note: Click on the "JS" tab to see detailed comments about what each button does. To see more of TweenLite in action visit our extensive CodePen collections. And so much more TweenLite is loaded with even more features allowing you to: kill tweens find active tweens specify how overwriting of tweens should be handled get/set the time, duration and progress of a tween delay tweens pass arguments into event callback functions specify values to tween from The best place to get all the juicy details on what TweenLite can do is in the TimelineLite documentation. Need even more tweening power? Be sure to check out TweenLite's beefy big brother TweenMax.
  25. Hi, How can i create this sort of effect with gsap https://perficientdigitallabs.com/work Thanks
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