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Found 516 results

  1. Hi, i'm trying to make alternative drag gable navigation element , that would scroll the page by dragging it up and down. So i have ran into 2 problems one is the moment you start to drag it jumps to the bounds top/bottom bounds of y axis instantly. Secondly i wan't to animate it, when you scroll the page normally, but that that brakes brakes everything also. Any help/tricks/tips with this would be greatly appreciated.
  2. Hi im kinda new to this and playing around with scrollmagic scenes and have a settup here, that follows a particular screen movement. this works nicely on the mousewheel but what id like to do is add in a next and previous scenes but cant see to figure out the best approach. any help would be much appreciated.
  3. how can i get access to the coords when dragging a div in angular using gsap draggable ?
  4. GSAP 3 is the most significant upgrade we have ever had. With 50+ new features, there's a lot to be excited about, but to keep this post manageable, we’ll cover only 5. You might also be interested in the GSAP 3 highlights video. See the release notes for all the juicy details. 1. Half the size of the old TweenMax! No kidding! GSAP retains almost all of its old functionality while adding 50+ features. We’ve learned a lot over the years and hopefully that shows. The core has been completely rebuilt from the ground up as modern ES modules. 2. Simplified API No more “Lite” and “Max” flavors. TweenMax, TweenLite, TimelineLite, and TimelineMax have all been consolidated into a single "gsap" object. So simple! For example: //simple tween like the old TweenMax.to(...) gsap.to(".class", {duration:2, x:100}); //create a timeline and add a tween var tl = gsap.timeline(); tl.to(".class", {duration:2, x:100}); Internally, there's one "Tween" class (replaces TweenLite/TweenMax) and one "Timeline" class (replaces TimelineLite/TimelineMax), and both have all of the features like repeat, yoyo, etc. When you call one of the gsap methods like .to(), .from(), etc., it returns an instance of the appropriate class with easily chainable methods. Duration is now defined in the vars object. This allows several benefits such as: Improved readability It fits much better with keyframes It allows default durations to be inherited (more on that below) You can use function-based values //OLD - duration was 2nd parameter TweenMax.to(".class", 1, {x:100}); //NEW - duration is now a property of the vars object gsap.to(".class", {duration:1, x:100}); All tweens are now stagger-able. There’s no need for the old staggerTo(), staggerFrom(), or staggerFromTo() methods because you can add staggers to regular tweens: //simple stagger gsap.to(".class", { x: "+=100", duration: 1, stagger: 0.5 //space each element's animation out by 0.5 seconds }); //advanced stagger gsap.to(".class", { x: "+=100", duration: 1, stagger: { amount: 2, from: "center", grid: "auto", onComplete: myFunction //define callbacks inside the stagger to make them apply to each sub-tween } }); See the Pen GSAP 3.0 Stagger demo by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. For more information about GSAP’s advanced stagger functionality, see this codepen. New, more compact ease format. less typing, more readable, and zero import hassles. Here's the new convention for all of the standard eases: //old way Elastic.easeOut Elastic.easeIn Elastic.easeInOut Elastic.easeOut.config(1, 0.5) SteppedEase.config(5) //new way "elastic" //same as "elastic.out" "elastic.in" "elastic.inOut" "elastic(1, 0.5)" //same as "elastic.out(1, 0.5)" "steps(5)" Backwards compatible The new GSAP even adjusts itself to accommodate the old syntax! There's technically no more TweenMax, TweenLite, TimelineLite, or TimelineMax, but they're all aliased so that the vast majority of legacy code still works, untouched! You don't have to rewrite all your code for GSAP 3, but we'd recommend shifting to the new, more concise syntax for all your new projects. 3. Inheritance/Defaults You don't have to keep setting the same ease over and over again...or duration...or whatever. Just set defaults on the parent timeline and let them be inherited by all its children! For example this repetitive code can be shortened, saving you time. //old way, without timeline defaults var tl = new TimelineMax(); tl.to(obj1, 2, {ease: Power2.easeInOut, rotation: -180}) .to(obj2, 2, {ease: Power2.easeInOut, rotation: -360}) .to(obj3, 2, {ease: Power2.easeInOut, rotation: -180}); //new way, with timeline defaults var tl = gsap.timeline({defaults:{ease: "power2.inOut", duration: 2}}); tl.to(obj1, {rotation: -180}) //child tweens will inherit the duration and from the parent timeline! .to(obj2, {rotation: -360}) .to(obj1, {rotation: -180}); See the Pen GSAP 3.0 Cube Walk by Pete Barr (@petebarr) on CodePen. Any defaults you set this way will get pushed into every child tween - it’s not limited to a certain subset of properties. This can really save you some typing! Inherited defaults are easily overwritten anytime a property is declared on a child. 4. All new MotionPathPlugin The new MotionPathPlugin makes it very easy to move any element along an SVG <path>! For more information about the MotionPathPlugin, check out its documentation and the video below. See the Pen GSAP 3.0 Stagger demo by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Club GreenSock members also get access to the new MotionPathHelper utility that lets you EDIT the motion path interactively in the browser. It’s never been so easy to move elements along a path! 5. New utility methods GSAP 3 exposes some surprisingly useful utility methods that might save you time and hassle. Need values to snap to the closest one in an array? Use gsap.utils.snap(). Tired of trying to figure out how to pull a random element out of an array? Let gsap.utils.random() do it for you. Want to distribute any value among an array of elements, complete with easing? It’s a piece of cake with gsap.utils.distribute(). Here’s how to use the gsap.utils.interpolate() method: //numbers let value = gsap.utils.interpolate(0, 100, 0.5); // 50 //strings let value = gsap.utils.interpolate("20px", "40px", 0.5); // 30px //colors let value = gsap.utils.interpolate("red", "blue", 0.5); // rgba(128,0,128,1) //objects let value = gsap.utils.interpolate({a:0, b:10, c:"red"}, {a:100, b:20, c:"blue"}, 0.5); // {a: 50, b: 15, c: "rgba(128,0,128,1)"} There's also an explainer video about how to use it. Using GSAP's built in utility functions can make complex code simple. Check out the video below to learn more and see an example: For a full list of the utility functions, some demos, and how to use them, check out the docs. There's waaaaay more... We've only scratched the surface of all the improvements in GSAP 3. Check out the release notes for a full list of the features and changes. There's also an updated getting started page. Ready to play? GSAP 3 Starter Pen (a CodePen template that already has the GSAP 3 files loaded. Fork away and have a blast!) This pen allows you to copy the resource URLs easily. Download the files from your account dashboard - they're in the zip (Including a tarball file that you can "npm install" and test with your build system locally - see the installation docs for more information) We will be featuring the top GSAP 3 demos when it launches along with attribution to the creators. If you create a demo using GSAP 3 that you'd like to submit, please let us know! Questions? Bugs? Hit us up in the forums or contact us directly. We'd love to hear what you think of GSAP 3. Happy tweening!
  5. The GreenSock Animation Platform (GSAP) animates anything JavaScript can touch (CSS properties, SVG, React, canvas, generic objects, whatever) and solves countless browser inconsistencies, all with blazing speed (up to 20x faster than jQuery). See why GSAP is used by over 8,000,000 sites and every major brand. Hang in there through the learning curve and you'll discover how fun animating with code can be. We promise it's worth your time. Quick links Loading GSAP Tweening Basics CSSPlugin 2D and 3D transforms Easing Staggers Callbacks Sequencing with Timelines Timeline control Getter / Setter methods Club GreenSock We'll cover the most popular features here but keep the GSAP docs handy for all the details. First, let's talk about what GSAP actually does... GSAP is a property manipulator Animation ultimately boils down to changing property values many times per second, making something appear to move, fade, spin, etc. GSAP snags a starting value, an ending value and then interpolates between them 60 times per second. For example, changing the x coordinate of an object from 0 to 1000 over the course of 1 second makes it move quickly to the right. Gradually changing opacity from 1 to 0 makes an element fade out. Your job as an animator is to decide which properties to change, how quickly, and the motion's style (known as easing - we'll get to that later). To be technically accurate, we could have named GSAP the "GreenSock Property Manipulator" (GSPM) but that doesn't have the same ring. DOM, SVG, <canvas>, and beyond GSAP doesn't have a pre-defined list of properties it can handle. It's super flexible, adjusting to almost anything you throw at it. GSAP can animate all of the following: CSS: 2D and 3D transforms, colors, width, opacity, border-radius, margin, and almost every CSS value. SVG attributes: viewBox, width, height, fill, stroke, cx, r, opacity, etc. Plugins like MorphSVG and DrawSVG can be used for advanced effects. Any numeric value For example, an object that gets rendered to an <canvas>. Animate the camera position in a 3D scene or filter values. GSAP is often used with Three.js and Pixi.js. Once you learn the basic syntax you'll be able to use GSAP anywhere that JavaScript runs. This guide will focus on the most popular use case: animating CSS properties of DOM elements. (Note: if you're using React, read this too.) If you're using any of the following frameworks, these articles may help: React Vue Angular What is GSAP Exactly? GSAP is a suite of tools for scripted animation. It includes: The GSAP core - The lightweight core of the engine which animates any property of any object. It makes use of tweens and to give you more control over your animations. Extras like time-saving plugins, easing tools, utility functions, and more. Loading GSAP Downloading GSAP Download the source files from your account dashboard. It's in the zip file with the bonus files that you're used to downloading. (Includes a tarball file that you can "npm install" and test with your build system locally - see the the installation docs for more information) GitHub View the source code on GitHub. Tweening Basics Let's start working with basic tweens. We'll use CodePen demos so that you can easily fork and edit each example right in your browser. gsap.to() To create an animation, gsap.to() needs 2 things: target - The object you are animating. This can be a raw object, an array of objects, or selector text like ".myClass". vars - An object with property/value pairs that you're animating to (like opacity:0.5, rotation:45, etc.) and other optional special properties like duration and onComplete. For example, to move an element with an id of "logo" to an x position of 100 (same as transform: translateX(100px)) over the course of 1 second: gsap.to("#logo", {duration: 1, x: 100}); Note: Remember that GSAP isn't just for DOM elements, so you could even animate custom properties of a raw object like this: var obj = {prop: 10}; gsap.to(obj, { duration: 1, prop: 200, //onUpdate fires each time the tween updates; we'll explain callbacks later. onUpdate: function() { console.log(obj.prop); //logs the value on each update. } }); Demo: gsap.to() Basic Usage See the Pen gsap.to() Basic Usage by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. If you would like to edit the code and experiment with your own properties and values, just hit the Edit on CodePen button. Notice that the opacity, scale, rotation and x values are all being animated in the demo above but DOM elements don't actually have those properties! In other words, there's no such thing as element.scale or element.opacity. How'd that work then? It's the magic of GSAP. Before we talk about the details behind that, let's take a look at GSAP's plugins and how they work in general because that will clarify some important concepts. Plugins Think of plugins like adding special properties that get dynamically added to GSAP in order to inject extra abilities. This keeps the core engine small and efficient, yet allows for unlimited expansion. Each plugin is associated with a specific property name. Among the most popular plugins are: SplitText: Splits text blocks into lines, words, and characters and enables you to easily animate each part. Draggable: Adds the ability to drag and drop any element. MorphSVGPlugin: Smooth morphing of complex SVG paths. DrawSVGPlugin: Animates the length and position of SVG strokes. CSSPlugin In the previous example, GSAP used a core plugin (one that's included in GSAP's core) called CSSPlugin. It automatically noticed that the target is a DOM element, so it intercepted the values and did some extra work behind the scenes, applying them as inline styles (element.style.transform and element.style.opacity in that case). Be sure to watch the "Getting Started" video at the top of this article to see it in action. CSSPlugin Features: Normalizes behavior across browsers and works around various browser bugs and inconsistencies Optimizes performance by auto-layerizing, caching transform components, preventing layout thrashing, etc. Controls 2D and 3D transform components (x, y, rotation, scaleX, scaleY, skewX, etc.) independently (eliminating order-of-operation woes) Reads computed values so you don't have to manually define starting values Animates complex values like borderRadius:"50% 50%" and boxShadow:"0px 0px 20px 20px red" Applies vendor-specific prefixes (-moz-, -ms-, -webkit-, etc.) when necessary Animates CSS Variables Normalizes behavior between SVG and DOM elements (particularly useful with transforms) ...and lots more Basically, CSSPlugin saves you a ton of headaches. Because animating CSS properties is so common, GSAP automatically senses when the target is a DOM element and feeds the CSS values to CSSPlugin internally. There's no need to wrap things in a css:{} object or anything. Less typing for you. You're welcome. To understand the advanced capabilities of the CSSPlugin read the full CSSPlugin documentation. 2D and 3D transforms CSSPlugin recognizes a number of short codes for transform-related properties: table { margin-bottom: 20px; } table, th, td { border: 1px solid #ccc; } tr:nth-child(2n) { background-color: #e5e5e5; } GSAP CSS x: 100 transform: translateX(100px) y: 100 transform: translateY(100px) rotation: 360 transform: rotate(360deg) rotationX: 360 transform: rotateX(360deg) rotationY: 360 transform: rotateY(360deg) skewX: 45 transform: skewX(45deg) skewY: 45 transform: skewY(45deg) scale: 2 transform: scale(2, 2) scaleX: 2 transform: scaleX(2) scaleY: 2 transform: scaleY(2) xPercent: 50 transform: translateX(50%) yPercent: 50 transform: translateY(50%) GSAP can animate any transform value but we strongly recommend using the shortcuts above because they're faster and more accurate (GSAP can skip parsing computed matrix values which are inherently ambiguous for rotational values beyond 180 degrees). The other major convenience GSAP affords is independent control of each component while delivering a consistent order-of-operation. Performance note: it's much easier for browsers to update x and y (transforms) rather than top and left which affect document flow. So to move something, we recommend animating x and y. Demo: Multiple 2D and 3D transforms See the Pen Multiple 2D and 3D Transforms by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Additional CSSPlugin notes Be sure to camelCase all hyphenated properties. font-size should be fontSize, background-color should be backgroundColor. When animating positional properties such as left and top, it's imperative that the elements you are trying to move also have a CSS position value of absolute, relative, or fixed. from() tweens Sometimes it's amazingly convenient to set up your elements where they should end up (after an intro animation, for example) and then animate from other values. That's exactly what gsap.from() is for. For example, perhaps your "#logo" element currently has its natural x position at 0 and you create the following tween: gsap.from("#logo", {duration: 1, x: 100}); The #logo will immediately jump to an x of 100 and animate to an x of 0 (or whatever it was when the tween started). In other words, it's animating FROM the values you provide to whatever they currently are. Demo: gsap.from() with multiple properties See the Pen TweenMax.from() tween by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. There is also a fromTo() method that allows you to define the starting values and the ending values: //tweens from width 0 to 100 and height 0 to 200 gsap.fromTo("#logo", {width: 0, height: 0}, {duration: 1.5, width: 100, height: 200}); Special properties A special property is like a reserved keyword that GSAP handles differently than a normal (animated) property. Special properties are used to define callbacks, delays, easing, staggers and more. A basic example of a special property is duration (which we've been using already): gsap.to("#logo", {duration: 1, x: 100}); Other common special properties are: delay - The delay before starting an animation. onComplete - A callback that should be triggered when the animation finishes. onUpdate - A callback that should be triggered every time the animation updates/renders. ease - The ease that should be used (like Power2.easeInOut). stagger - staggers the starting time for each target/element animation. Easing If your animation had a voice, what would it sound like? Should it look playful? Robotic? Slick? Realistic? To become an animation rock star, you must develop a keen sense of easing because it determines the style of movement between point A and point B. An "ease" controls the rate of change during a tween. Below is an interactive tool that allows you to visually explore various eases. Note: You can click on the underlined parts of the code at the bottom to change the values.
  6. Hello I am trying to animate each section on scroll and the headline text within section 3 and 5. The headline text I would like to have another duration so it finishes earlier. But it only works if the two scene durations are similar.
  7. Hi all, I started working on an idea and want to stop before I go further and ask a few questions and get some criticism on best practices. I'll preface with saying that I'm only concerned with modern browsers. First, GSAP performance. Is there a better approach I could take to accomplish the same thing and would perform better? Second, React with GSAP. This should probably be a separate question... I've been building react apps via `create-react-app` for a while and in the past, I had some issues using GSAP in React. Mostly, with using plugins that `require TweenLite`, requiring me to eject the `create-react-app` and customize the webpack config to resolve the alias. (As an aside, I now get around ejecting for simple things like this by using react-app-rewired). There are some edge case issues in particular I'm trying to solve. When you move the mouse quickly from left to right, sometime the cube will spin too much. I've played around with some boolean checks to see if I'm overlapping tweens or something but nothing seems to help. I suspect it's based on the way I'm "snapping" the cube's most forward face to the center when the mouse moves back to the center. EDIT 1... is it possible that this is related to React state? I wonder if react-gsap-enhancer would help. EDIT 2... looks like the codepen may even have other issues that aren't present in my local setup. If you move the mouse too far past the cube it stops, which should only occur when the mouse is over the cube. And it's more difficult to see the real issue I'm trying to solve in the codepen.
  8. Hi! I've made a quick codepen showing a problem with animating height/display property smoothly. As you see in the codepen, when you click "Open content" - some content below will "jump" to a new position because the hidden content will take up space when being displayed. Any idea how I can smoothly make this transition from hidden/visible with height so that the content below will not jump like that?
  9. I am trying to create a website using the background effect exactly similar as implemented in this website, http://brightmedia.pl/ . On inspect element the div that creating the parallax effect on background from mouse move and scroll as well, we can see that it is changing the translate3D() property of the element on mouse move. Please guide me how can I achieve this same background effect?
  10. I've installed and imported GSAP and @types/gsap, and my file.ts import it well, but when i run gulp with the Typescript Gulp Configuration i get this error: Error: Cannot find module 'babelify' from 'D:path-to-directory\node_modules\gsap'. I've installed all babel components until i get one last error that tells me "cannot find the function canCompile".
  11. Hi everyone, I was about to implement something like this in my current project, but I guess the GSAP codebase already have it, is it accessible for something else than DOM manipulation? Best.
  12. Hi all I created a prototype some time ago. It has many GSAP animations. I want to focus on the animations that appears when you scroll. For instance the shortcut icons. If you compare my prototype with the production site you'll see that the animations are running slower on the production site. Prototype: http://yousee.grandorf.dk/homepage/homepage-clean.html Production site: https://yousee.dk/ The code is the exact same: import inView from 'in-view'; import { TimelineLite, TweenLite } from 'gsap'; export function heroAnimation() { inView('.hero--animated').once('enter', () => { const items = ['.hero__title', '.hero__lead', '.hero__action', '.hero__legal-text']; const tl = new TimelineLite({delay: .4}); tl.staggerTo(items, 1, {opacity: 1, y: 0, ease: window.Power2.easeOut}, .15) .to('.hero__brand-logo-image', 2, {opacity: 1, ease: window.Power2.easeOut}); }); } export function shortcutAnimation() { inView('.gsap-shortcuts').on('enter', el => { const items = el.querySelectorAll('.ys-shortcut'); const tl = new TimelineLite({delay: .25}); tl.staggerTo(items, .3, {opacity: 1, scale: 1, ease: window.Back.easeOut}, .15); }); } export function mediaboxAnimation() { inView('.media-box--animated').on('enter', el => { TweenLite.to(el, 1, {opacity: 1, y: 0, ease: window.Power2.easeOut}); }); } export function mediacardAnimation() { inView('.gsap-media-card').on('enter', el => { const items = el.querySelectorAll('.media-card--animated'); const tl = new TimelineLite({delay: .5}); tl.staggerTo(items, .5, {opacity: 1, y: 0, ease: window.Power2.easeOut}, .2); }); } What can cause this issue? Any ideas or help will be appreciated a lot. Thanks If you focus on the icons staggering in - you should be able to see the difference:
  13. GreenSock

    CSSRulePlugin

    Allows TweenLite and TweenMax to animate the raw style sheet rules which affect all objects of a particular selector rather than affecting an individual DOM element's style (that's what the CSSPlugin is for). For example, if you have a CSS class named ".myClass" that sets background-color to "#FF0000", you could tween that to a different color and ALL of the objects on the page that use ".myClass" would have their background color change. Typically it is best to use the regular CSSPlugin to animate css-related properties of individual elements so that you can get very precise control over each object, but sometimes it can be useful to tween the global rules themselves instead. For example, pseudo elements (like :after, :before, etc. are impossible to reference directly in JavaScript, but you can animate them using CSSRulePlugin as shown below. See the Pen CSSRulePlugin by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Learn more in the CSSRulePlugin documentation.
  14. GreenSock

    RoundPropsPlugin

    If you'd like the inbetween values in a tween to always get rounded to the nearest integer, use the roundProps special property. Just pass in a comma-delimited String containing the property names that you'd like rounded. For example, if you're tweening the x, y, and alpha properties of mc and you want to round the x and y values (not alpha) every time the tween is rendered, you'd do: TweenMax.to(element, 2, {x:300, y:200, alpha:0.5, roundProps:"x,y"});
  15. GreenSock

    TimelineLite

    TimelineLite is a lightweight, intuitive timeline class for building and managing sequences of TweenLite, TweenMax, TimelineLite, and/or TimelineMax instances. You can think of a TimelineLite instance like a container where you place tweens (or other timelines) over the course of time. build sequences easily by adding tweens with methods like to(), from(), staggerFrom(), add(), and more. tweens can overlap as much as you want and you have complete control over where they get placed on the timeline. add labels, play(), stop(), seek(), restart(), and even reverse() smoothly anytime. nest timelines within timelines as deeply as you want. set the progress of the timeline using its progress() method. For example, to skip to the halfway point, set myTimeline.progress(0.5); tween the time() or progress() values to fastforward/rewind the timeline. You could even attach a slider to one of these properties to give the user the ability to drag forwards/backwards through the timeline. speed up or slow down the entire timeline using timeScale(). You can even tween this property to gradually speed up or slow down. add onComplete, onStart, onUpdate, and/or onReverseComplete callbacks using the constructor’s vars object. use the powerful add() method to add labels, callbacks, tweens and timelines to a timeline. base the timing on frames instead of seconds if you prefer. Please note, however, that the timeline’s timing mode dictates its childrens’ timing mode as well. kill the tweens of a particular object with killTweensOf() or get the tweens of an object with getTweensOf() or get all the tweens/timelines in the timeline with getChildren() If you need even more features like, repeat(), repeatDelay(), yoyo(), currentLabel(), getLabelsArray(), getLabelAfter(), getLabelBefore(), getActive(), tweenTo() and more, check out TimelineMax which extends TimelineLite. Sample Code //instantiate a TimelineLite var tl = new TimelineLite(); //add a from() tween at the beginning of the timline tl.from(head, 0.5, {left:100, opacity:0}); //add another tween immediately after tl.from(subhead, 0.5, {left:-100, opacity:0}); //use position parameter "+=0.5" to schedule next tween 0.5 seconds after previous tweens end tl.from(feature, 0.5, {scale:.5, autoAlpha:0}, "+=0.5"); //use position parameter "-=0.5" to schedule next tween 0.25 seconds before previous tweens end. //great for overlapping tl.from(description, 0.5, {left:100, autoAlpha:0}, "-=0.25"); //add a label 0.5 seconds later to mark the placement of the next tween tl.add("stagger", "+=0.5") //to jump to this label use: tl.play("stagger"); //stagger the animation of all icons with 0.1s between each tween's start time //this tween is added tl.staggerFrom(icons, 0.2, {scale:0, autoAlpha:0}, 0.1, "stagger"); Demo See the Pen TimelineLite Control : new GS.com by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Watch The video below will walk you through the types of problems TimelineLite solves and illustrate the flexibility and power of our core sequencing tool. Learn more in the TimelineLite docs. For even more sequencing power and control take a look at TimelineMax.
  16. Hi guys! I'm learning GSAP a few months, with the help of community, this is my first work using GSAP, in progress yet. Thanks all for help! And i have another question, about page transitions, shared element transitions between pages. See website reference at link: https://alfacharlie.co/ See the effect of transitions between pages, the softness the animations. I used the barba.js in html + css and it worked, but not working fine in wordpress, someone to help me achieve page transitions in wordpress site?
  17. GreenSock

    CSSPlugin

    With the help of the CSSPlugin, GSAP can animate almost any css-related property of DOM elements including the obvious things like width, height, margin, padding, top, left, and more plus more interesting things like transforms (rotation, scaleX, scaleY, skewX, skewY, x, y, rotationX, and rotationY), colors, opacity, and lots more. Don't forget to load the CSSPlugin to enable these capabilities. Normally, css-specific properties would need to be wrapped in their own object and passed in like TweenLite.to(element, 1, {css:{left:"100px", top:"50px"}}); so that the engine knows that those properties belong to the CSSPlugin, but because animating DOM elements in the browser is so common, TweenLite and TweenMax (as of version 1.8.0) automatically check to see if the target is a DOM element and if it is (and you haven't already defined a "css" object in the vars parameter), the engine creates that css object for you and shifts any properties that aren't reserved (like onComplete, ease, delay, etc. or plugin keywords like scrollTo, raphael, easel, etc.) into that css object when the tween renders for the first time. In the code examples below, we'll use the more concise style that omits the css:{} object but be aware that either style is acceptable. See the Pen CSSPlugin by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Learn more in the CSSPlugin documentation.
  18. GreenSock

    TweenLite

    TweenLite is an extremely fast, lightweight, and flexible animation tool that serves as the foundation of the GreenSock Animation Platform (GSAP). A TweenLite instance handles tweening one or more properties of any object (or array of objects) over time. TweenLite can be used on its own to accomplish most animation chores with minimal file size or it can be used in conjunction with advanced sequencing tools like TimelineLite or TimelineMax to make complex tasks much simpler. Basic Usage The most basic use of TweenLite would be to tween a numeric property of a generic JavaScript object. var demo = {score:0}, scoreDisplay = document.getElementById("scoreDisplay"); //create a tween that changes the value of the score property of the demo object from 0 to 100 over the course of 20 seconds. //each time the tween updates call the function showScore() which will handle displaying the value of demo.score. var tween = TweenLite.to(demo, 20, {score:100, onUpdate:showScore}) function showScore() { scoreDisplay.innerHTML = demo.score.toFixed(2); } See the Pen TweenLite Tween Numeric Property by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. note: Click on the "Result" tab to see the value of score animate. Animate CSS Properties For most HTML5 projects you will probably want to animate DOM elements. No problem. Once you load CSSPlugin TweenLite can easily animate CSS properties of DOM elements. /*external js http://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/gsap/latest/TweenLite.min.js http://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/gsap/latest/plugins/CSSPlugin.min.js */ window.onload = function() { var logo = document.getElementById("logo"); TweenLite.to(logo, 2, {left:"542px", backgroundColor:"black", borderBottomColor:"#90e500", color:"white"}); } See the Pen Animate Multiple Properties by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. note: Click on the "Result" tab to see the animation. TweenLite isn't limited to animating DOM elements, in fact it isn't tied to any rendering layer. It works great with canvas and WebGL too! Control TweenLite is packed with methods that give you precise control over every tween. Play, pause, reverse, and adjust the timeScale (speed) whenever you need to. The demo below shows the power of just a handful of TweenLite's methods. See the Pen Control Playback by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. note: Click on the "JS" tab to see detailed comments about what each button does. To see more of TweenLite in action visit our Jump Start guide and extensive CodePen collections. And so much more TweenLite is loaded with even more features allowing you to: kill tweens find active tweens specify how overwriting of tweens should be handled get/set the time, duration and progress of a tween delay tweens pass arguments into event callback functions specify values to tween from The best place to get all the juicy details on what TweenLite can do is in the TimelineLite documentation. Need even more tweening power? Be sure to check out TweenLite's beefy big brother TweenMax.
  19. GreenSock

    TweenMax

    TweenMax is the most feature-packed (and popular) animation tool in the GSAP arsenal. For convenience and loading efficiency, it includes TweenLite, TimelineLite, TimelineMax, CSSPlugin, AttrPlugin, RoundPropsPlugin, BezierPlugin, and EasePack (all in one file). See the Pen GSAP Overview by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Quick links Getting started What's so special about GSAP? Full documentation Showcase (examples) Since TweenMax extends TweenLite, it can do ANYTHING TweenLite can do plus more. You can mix and match TweenLite and TweenMax in your project as you please. Like TweenLite, a TweenMax instance handles tweening one or more properties of any object (or array of objects) over time. TweenMax's unique special properties TweenMax's syntax is identical to TweenLite's. Notice how the TweenMax tween below uses the special properties: repeat, repeatDelay, yoyo and the onRepeat event callback. //basic illustration of TweenMax's repeat, repeatDelay, yoyo and onRepeat var box = document.getElementById("greenBox"), count = 0, tween; tween = TweenMax.to(box, 2, {left:"740px", repeat:10, yoyo:true, onRepeat:onRepeat, repeatDelay:0.5, ease:Linear.easeNone}); function onRepeat() { count++; box.innerHTML = count; TweenLite.set(box, {backgroundColor:"hsl(" + Math.random() * 255 + ", 90%, 60%)"}); } See the Pen TweenMax basic repeat and onRepeat by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Staggered animations TweenMax makes it easy to create staggered animations on multiple objects. The animations can overlap, run in direct sequence or have gaps between their start times. TweenMax's three stagger methods: TweenMax.staggerTo(), TweenMax.staggerFrom() and TweenMax.staggerFromTo() are literal one-line wonders. See the Pen TweenMax.staggerTo() by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Additional Methods TweenMax inherits a ton of methods from TweenLite and has quite a few of its own. ul.chart {width:300px; float:left; margin-right:80px; } ul.chart li:nth-child(1){ font-weight:bold; list-style:none; margin-left:-20px; font-size:20px; margin-bottom:20px; } TweenLite and TweenMax Methods delay() delayedCall() duration() eventCallback from() fromTo() getTweensOf() invalidate() isActive() kill() killDelayedCallsTo() killTweensOf() pause() paused() play() progress() restart() resume() reverse() reversed() seek() set() startTime() time() timeScale() to() totalDuration() totalProgress() totalTime() Methods exclusive to TweenMax getAllTweens() isTweening() killAll() killChildTweensOf() pauseAll() repeat() repeatDelay() resumeAll() staggerFrom() staggerFromTo() staggerTo() updateTo() yoyo() Learn more in the TweenMax documentation.
  20. SplitText is an easy to use JavaScript utility that allows you to split HTML text into characters, words and lines. Its easy to use, extremely flexible and works all the way back to IE8. Although SplitText is naturally a good fit for creating HTML5 text animation effects with GreenSock's animation tools, it has no dependencies on GSAP, jQuery or any other libraries. .videoNav { color:#555; margin-top: 12px; } 0:00 Intro 0:21 SplitText solves problems 2:01 Basic Split 3:34 Configuration options 6:35 Animation View the JS panel in the Codepen demo above to see how easy it is to: Split text into words and characters. Pass the chars array into a TweenMax staggerFrom() tween for animation. Revert the text back to its pre-split state when you are done animating. Additional features and notes You can specify a new class to be added to each split element and also add an auto-incrementing class like .word1, .word2, .word3 etc. View demo You don't have to manually insert <br>tags, SplitText honors natural line breaks. SplitText doesn't force non-breaking spaces into the divs like many other solutions on the web do. SplitText is not designed to work with SVG <text> nodes. Learn more in our detailed SplitText API documentation. Please visit our SplitText Codepen Collection for more demos of SplitText in action. Where can I get it? SplitText is a membership benefit of Club GreenSock ("Shockingly Green" and "Business Green" levels). Joining Club GreenSock gets you a bunch of other bonus plugins and tools like ThrowPropsPlugin as well, so check out greensock.com/club/ to get details and sign up today. The support of club members has been critical to the success of GreenSock - it's what makes building these tools possible.
  21. GreenSock

    GSDevTools

    Your animation workflow is about to get a major boost. GSDevTools gives you a visual UI for interacting with and debugging GSAP animations, complete with advanced playback controls, keyboard shortcuts, global synchronization and more. Jump to specific scenes, set in/out points, play in slow motion to reveal intricate details, and even switch to a "minimal" mode on small screens. GSDevTools makes building and reviewing GSAP animations simply delightful. Get Started Load the JavaScript file //be sure to use a path that works in your dev environment Requirements GSDevTools requires TweenMax (well, actually just CSSPlugin, TweenLite, TimelineLite, AttrPlugin which are all included in TweenMax) version 1.20.3 or higher. It also uses Draggable under the hood, but in order to minimize hassle for end users, Draggable is included inside the GSDevTools file itself. How do I get it? GSDevTools is available to Club GreenSock members ("Shockingly Green" and above). Just download GSAP with the bonus files zip from your Dashboard. Try GSDevTools for free on CodePen. FAQ Why is my Global Timeline 1000 seconds long? That means you've probably got an infinitely repeating animation somewhere. GSDevTools caps its duration at 1000 seconds. Scrubbing to Infinity is awkward. Does loading GSDevTools impact runtime performance? Since it must monitor and record the root timeline, yes, there is a slight performance hit but probably not noticeable. Keep in mind that usually you'll only load GSDevTools while you're developing/reviewing your animations and then remove it when you're ready to launch, so ultimately it shouldn't be much of a factor anyway. Why isn't GSDevTools in the CDN or Github repo? Because it's a membership benefit of Club GreenSock. It's a way for us to give back to those who support our ongoing development efforts. That's why we've been able to continue innovating for over a decade. See https://greensock.com/why-license for details about our philosophy. Does GSDevTools work with other animation libraries? Nope, it depends on some unique capabilities baked into the GSAP architecture. What will I do with all the time this tool saves me? Take up a new hobby, ponder deep philosophical questions, make cookies - it's up to you.
  22. GreenSock

    jquery.gsap.js

    Good news for anyone using jQuery.animate() - the new jquery.gsap.js plugin allows you to have GSAP take control under the hood so that your animations perform better; no need to change any of your code. Plus GSAP adds numerous capabilities, allowing you to tween colors, 2D transforms (rotation, scaleX, scaleY, skewX, skewY, x, y), 3D transforms (rotationX, rotationY, z, perspective), backgroundPosition, boxShadow, and lots more. You can even animate to a different className! This plugin makes it very easy to audition GSAP in your project without needing to learn a new API. We still highly recommend learning the regular GSAP API because it's much more flexible, robust, and object-oriented than jQuery.animate(), but for practical purposes this plugin delivers a bunch of power with almost zero effort. Benefits Up to 20x faster than jQuery's native animate() method. See the interactive speed comparison for yourself. Works exactly the same as the regular jQuery.animate() method. Same syntax. No need to change your code. Just load the plugin (and TweenMax or TweenLite & CSSPlugin) and you're done. Adds the ability to animate additional properties (without vendor prefixes): colors (backgroundColor, borderColor, color, etc.) boxShadow textShadow 2D transforms like rotation, scaleX, scaleY, x, y, skewX, and skewY, including 2D transformOrigin functionality 3D transforms like rotationY rotationX, z, and perspective, including 3D transformOrigin functionality borderRadius (without the need to define each corner and use browser prefixes) className which allows you to define a className (or use “+=” or “-=” to add/remove a class) and have the engine figure out which properties are different and animate the differences using whatever ease and duration you want. backgroundPosition clip Animate along Bezier curves, even rotating along with the path or plotting a smoothly curved Bezier through a set of points you provide (including 3D!). GSAP’s Bezier system is super flexible in that it’s not just for x/y/z coordinates – it can handle ANY set of properties. Plus it will automatically adjust the movement so that it’s correctly proportioned the entire way, avoiding a common problem that plagues Bezier animation systems. You can define Bezier data as Cubic or Quadratic or raw anchor points. Add tons of easing options including proprietary SlowMo and SteppedEase along with all the industry standards When animating the rotation of an object, automatically go in the shortest direction (clockwise or counter-clockwise) using shortRotation, shortRotationX, or shortRotationY For a detailed comparison between jQuery and GSAP, check out the cage match. Usage Download the files (requires version 1.8.0 (or later) of TweenMax or TweenLite!) and then add the appropriate script tags to your page. The plugin file (jquery.gsap.min.js) itself does NOT include GSAP because you get to choose which files you want to load depending on the features you want. The simplest way to get all the goodies is by loading TweenMax (which includes TweenLite, CSSPlugin, TimelineLite, TimelineMax, EasePack, BezierPlugin, and RoundPropsPlugin too). For example, assuming you put the TweenMax.min.js file into a folder named "js" which is in the same directory as your HTML file, you'd simply place the following code into your HTML file: All the goodies: <script src="js/TweenMax.min.js"></script> <script src="js/jquery.gsap.min.js"></script> If, however, you're more concerned about file size and only want to use TweenLite, CSSPlugin (for animating DOM elements), and some extra eases, here is a common set of script tags: Lightweight: <script src="js/plugins/CSSPlugin.min.js"></script> <script src="js/easing/EasePack.min.js"></script> <script src="js/TweenLite.min.js"></script> <script src="js/jquery.gsap.min.js"></script> Then, to animate things, you can use the regular jQuery.animate() method like this: //tween all elements with class "myClass" to top:100px and left:200px over the course of 3 seconds $(".myClass").animate({top:100, left:200}, 3000); //do the same thing, but with a Strong.easeOut ease $(".myClass").animate({top:100, left:200}, {duration:3000, easing:"easeOutStrong"}); //tween width to 50% and then height to 200px (sequenced) and then call myFunction $(".myClass").animate({width:"50%"}, 2000).animate({height:"200px"}, {duration:3000, complete:myFunction}); See jQuery's API docs for details about the syntax and options available with the animate() method. And yes, the jQuery.stop() method works too. Caveats If you define any of the following in the animate() call, it will revert to the native jQuery.animate() method in order to maximize compatibility (meaning no GSAP speed boost and no GSAP-specific special properties will work in that particular call): a "step" function - providing the parameters to the callback that jQuery normally does would be too costly performance-wise. One of the biggest goals of GSAP is optimized performance; We'd strongly recommend NOT using a "step" function for that reason. Instead, you can use an onUpdate if you want a function to be called each time the values are updated. Anything with a value of "show", "hide", "toggle", "scrollTop" or "scrollLeft". jQuery handles these in a unique way and we don't want to add the code into CSSPlugin that would be required to support them natively in GSAP. If skipGSAP:true is found in the "properties" parameter, it will force things to fall back to the native jQuery.animate() method. So if a particular animation is acting different than what you're used to with the native jQuery.animate() method, you can just force the fallback using this special property. Like $(".myClass").animate({scrollTop:200, skipGSAP:true}); This is our first crack at a jQuery plugin, so please let us know if anything breaks or if you have ideas for improvement.
  23. GreenSock

    Draggable

    #container { margin:0; padding:0; font-family: Signika Negative, Asap, sans-serif; font-weight: 300; font-size: 17px; line-height: 150%; } #container h1 { font-family: Signika Negative, Asap, sans-serif; font-weight: 300; font-size: 48px; margin: 10px 0 0 0; padding: 0; line-height: 115%; text-shadow: 1px 1px 0 white; } #container h2 { font-family: Signika Negative, Asap, sans-serif; font-weight: normal; font-size:30px; color: #111; margin: 18px 0 0 0; padding: 0; line-height:115%; } #container p { line-height: 150%; color:#555; margin: 0 0 10px 0; } #container a { color:#71b200; } #container .normalBullets code { font-size: inherit; color: inherit; font-weight: normal; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; } #container .normalBullets li strong { font-size: 110%; } #container .normalBullets li { margin-bottom:8px; } #container .blackBG h1, #container .darkBG h1 { color: #ddd; text-shadow: none; } #container .blackBG p { color: #999; } #container .section { width: 100%; text-align: center; position: relative; padding: 20px; } /* .block was causing conflict with wp theme --- renamed below */ #container .customblock { padding: 10px; text-align: left; position: relative; } #container .blackBG { background-color: black; } #container .lightBG { background-color: #e4e4e4; } #container .subtleDark { color: #999; text-shadow: none; } #container .blackBG p strong { color:#ddd; font-weight: normal; } /** CODE **/ #container .code { width: 100%; border: 1px solid #555; padding: 0; margin: 20px 0; } #container .code pre.prettyprint { margin:0; overflow: auto; } #container .codeTitle { color: #aaa; background-color: #111; padding: 8px; font-size:18px; border-bottom: 1px solid #555; } #container code, #scroller code { color: black; font-size: 16px; } #container .blackBG code, #container .darkBG code { /* carl removed color: #ccc; */ } #container pre { font-size: 1.1em; padding:8px; background-color:#333; color:white; border: 1px solid #777; } /** TOSS **/ #container .box { background-color: #91e600; text-align: center; font-family: Asap, Avenir, Arial, sans-serif; width: 196px; height: 100px; line-height: 100px; overflow: hidden; color: black; position: absolute; top:0; -webkit-border-radius: 10px; -moz-border-radius: 10px; border-radius: 10px; } /** SCROLL **/ #scrollContainer { position:relative; height: 370px; } #scroller { top:20px; left:10%; position:absolute; width:80%; height:280px; overflow:scroll; background-color:#ddd; padding:25px; color:#333; border:4px solid #999; } #scroller * { box-sizing: content-box; } #scroller p { color: #444; } #scroller p strong { color:#111; } #container .controls { background-color: #222; border: 1px solid #555; color: #bbb; font-size: 18px; } #container .controls ul { list-style: none; padding: 0; margin: 0; } #container .controls li { display: inline-block; padding: 8px 0 8px 10px; margin:0; } /** BUTTONS **/ #container .button { display:inline-block; border-radius:8px; border-bottom-width: 2px; box-shadow: inset 0px 1px 0px rgba(255,255,255,0.6), 0px 3px 6px 0px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.6); cursor:pointer; text-align: center; font-family: Signika Negative, Asap, Avenir, Arial, sans-serif; position:relative; margin: 4px; color:black; } #container .largeButton { padding: 12px 24px; font-size: 20px; margin: 12px 8px; min-width:110px; } .greenGradient { border: 1px solid #6d9a22; background-color: #699a18; background: linear-gradient(to bottom, #8cce1e 0%,#699a18 52%,#639314 53%,#76b016 100%); /* W3C */ text-shadow: 1px 1px 2px #384d16; color:#fff; text-decoration: none; } /** EXPANDABLE POINTS (FAQ) **/ .expPoint, .expList li { list-style: none; line-height: normal; margin: 0 0 0 8px; padding: 6px 4px 4px 24px; position:relative; border: 1px solid rgba(204,204,204,0); font-size: 110%; color: #111; font-weight: normal; } .expPoint, .expContent { font-family: Signika Negative, Asap, sans-serif; font-weight: 300; line-height: 140%; } .expPoint:hover, .expList li:hover { background-color:white; border: 1px solid rgb(216,216,216); } .expContent { height: 0; overflow: hidden; color: #444; margin: 2px 0 0 0; padding-top: 0; font-size:16px; } .expMore { color: #71b200; text-decoration: underline; font-size:0.8em; } .arrow-right { width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 5px solid transparent; border-bottom: 5px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #999; display:inline-block; margin: -4px 8px 0 -14px; vertical-align: middle; opacity:0.8; } .tableCellDesktop { display: table-cell; } .tableCellDesktop img { left: 120px; } @media screen and (max-width: 860px) { .tableCellDesktop { display: block; } .tableCellDesktop img { left: 0px; } } When you pair GreenSock's Draggable with ThrowPropsPlugin, you get the ultimate tag-team for making a DOM element draggable, spinnable, tossable, and even flick-scrollable! You can impose bounds, complex snapping rules, and have things glide to a stop in a silky-smooth way, all with as little as one line of code! No kidding. Works great on touch devices too. Below you'll find 3 examples of what Draggable can do when it's got some ThrowPropsPlugin love under the hood. Check out the code samples too (they auto-update as you change options). Throw By default, Draggable uses type:"x,y" meaning it'll use css transforms for positional movement (hardware accelerated when possible). Activate the some of the snapping options below and watch how nicely things glide into place exactly on the grid or snap into place as you drag. Notice the edge resistance as you try to drag past the edges; everything is configurable. [ View this on codepen.io ] Drag and throw me Drag and throw me too Options Snap end position to grid Live snap Lock axis Code Draggable.create(".box", { type: "x,y", edgeResistance: 0.65, bounds: "#container", throwProps: true }); Spin Set Draggable's type to "rotation" and watch what happens (grab the knob below and spin it). ThrowPropsPlugin tracks the velocity of the rotation and continues when you release your mouse (or finger for touch devices), gliding to a stop naturally. Activate the "Snap to 90-degree increments" option to see how easy it is to make it always land at certain rotational values without any jerking or awkwardness. Snap to 90-degree increments Code Draggable.create("#knob", {type: "rotation", throwProps: true}); Scroll (Drag & Flick) Draggable can even be used to control the scrollTop and/or scrollLeft properties of an element, complete with overscrolling, snap-back, momentum continuation, and edge resistance. It's as simple as changing the type to "scroll". And Draggable doesn't use artificial scrollbars like some other tools - it uses native scrolling with the standard OS/browser scrollbar UI. Play with the demo below and see for yourself. Drag me to scroll me Click and drag this content and then let go as you're dragging to throw it. Notice how it smoothly glides to a rest, respecting the initial velocity and even permitting overscolling with bounce-back without forcing fake/simulated scrollbars. It's actually using the scrollTop or scrollLeft of the container, and then if/when it exceeds the bounds, it'll apply a translate3d() transform for hardware-accelerated performance, and it'll even fall back to using padding when 3D transforms aren't available. Yes, it even works in IE8! How does it work? When you create the Draggable with type:"scroll" (or "scrollTop" or "scrollLeft"), it will create a div and wrap it around the native content of the target element so that it can move things appropriately. So that wrapper div ends up being the only child of the element. Then, as you drag, it updates the scrollTop/scrollLeft of the element until you exceed the bounds at which time it'll either add a translate3d() CSS transform (if supported) to that wrapper div or fall back to using padding for older browsers. This gives you the best of both worlds - it delivers native scrolling with normal scrollbar UI that's built into the OS/browser, plus outstanding performance on mobile devices due to the translate3d() sweetness on overscroll, and compatibility even with IE8, all in a 3.4k gzipped footprint (not including TweenLite or CSSPlugin which are required). Oh, and don't forget the kinetic-based flick scrolling that's enabled when you load ThrowPropsPlugin and set throwProps:true in the config object. When you drag past the normal scrolling limits, the edgeResistance kicks in (you control how much). It just "feels" natural and fluid, much more so than most other options out there. Did we mention Draggable works great with touch events too? And if the user flick-scrolls and then while it's animating, they use their mouse wheel or grab the scrollbar to take control themselves, Draggable automatically releases control and stops the animation. Don't worry your pretty little head. Usage Setup is a breeze. One line is all you need: Draggable.create("#container", {type:"scroll", throwProps:true, edgeResistance:0.35}); That's it! Of course you can tweak the configuration however you please. Want to only scroll vertically? Use type:"scrollTop". Or for horizontal scrolling, use type:"scrollLeft". When you use simply type:"scroll", it allows scrolling in either direction. Change the edgeResistance to 1 if you don't want the user to be able to drag past the edge. Note that ThrowPropsPlugin is a membership benefit of Club GreenSock ("Shockingly Green" and "Business Green" levels), but the Draggable works fine without that - you just won't get the kinetic-based motion. You can still drag things. Not just for scrolling As you can see from the examples above, Draggable is multi-talented. Change the type to "x,y" to make the entire object draggable around the screen (literally moving it, not scrolling). Or type:"top,left" does the same thing, but uses the "top" and "left" css properties instead of translateX() and translateY() CSS transforms. Or if you want to be able to drag-spin an object, use type:"rotation". In fact, it'll even honor the transform-origin of the element. Options type: scroll scrollTop scrollLeft top,left top left x,y x y rotation edgeResistance: 0 0.1 0.25 0.5 0.75 1 throwProps (kinetic motion) lock axis Code Draggable.create("#scroller", {type:"scroll", edgeResistance:0.5, throwProps:true}); Features Touch enabled - works great on tablets, phones, and desktop browsers. Incredibly smooth - GPU-accelerated and requestAnimationFrame-driven for ultimate performance. Compared to other options out there, Draggable just feels far more natural and fluid, particularly when imposing bounds and momentum. Momentum-based animation - if you have ThrowPropsPlugin loaded, you can simply set throwProps:true in the config object and it'll automatically apply natural, momentum-based movement after the mouse/touch is released, causing the object to glide gracefully to a stop. You can even control the amount of resistance, maximum or minimum duration, etc. Complex snapping made easy - snap to points within a certain radius (see example), or feed in an array of values and it'll select the closest one, or implement your own custom logic in a function. Ultimate flexibility. You can have things live-snap (while dragging) or only on release (even with momentum applied, thanks to ThrowPropsPlugin)! Impose bounds - tell a draggable element to stay within the bounds of another DOM element (a container) as in bounds:"#container" or define bounds as coordinates like bounds:{top:100, left:0, width:1000, height:800} or specific maximum/minimum values like bounds:{minRotation:0, maxRotation:270}. Sense overlaps with hitTest() - see if one element is overlapping another and even set a tolerance threshold (like at least 20 pixels or 25% of either element's total surface area) using the super-flexible Draggable.hitTest() method. Feed it a mouse event and it'll tell you if the mouse is over the element. See http://codepen.io/GreenSock/pen/GFBvn for a simple example. Define a trigger element - maybe you want only a certain area to trigger the dragging (like the top bar of a window) - it's as simple as trigger:"#topBar", for example. Drag position, rotation, or scroll - lots of drag types to choose from: "x,y" | "top,left" | "rotation" | "scroll" | "x" | "y" | "top" | "left" | "scrollTop" | "scrollLeft" Lock movement along a certain axis - set lockAxis:true and Draggable will watch the direction the user starts to drag and then restrict it to that axis. Or if you only want to allow vertical or horizontal movement, that's easy too using the type ("top", "y" or "scrollTop" only allow vertical movement; "x", "left", or "scrollLeft" only allow horizontal movement). Rotation honors transform origin - by default, spinnable elements will rotate around their center, but you can set transformOrigin to something else to make the pivot point be elsewhere. For example, if you call TweenLite.set(yourElement, {transformOrigin:"top left"}) before dragging, it will rotate around its top left corner. Or use % or px. Whatever is set in the element's css will be honored. Rich callback system and event dispatching - you can use any of the following callbacks: onPress, onDragStart, onDrag, onDragEnd, onRelease,, onLockAxis, and onClick. Inside the callbacks, "this" refers to the Draggable instance itself, so you can easily access its "target" or bounds, etc. If you prefer event listeners instead, Draggable dispatches events too so you can do things likeyourDraggable.addEventListener("dragend", yourFunc); Works great with SVG Even works in transformed containers! Got a Draggable inside a rotated/scaled container? No problem. No other tool handles this properly that we've seen. Auto-scrolling, even in multiple containers - set autoScroll:1 for normal-speed auto scrolling, or autoScroll:2 would scroll twice as fast, etc. The closer you move toward the edge, the faster scrolling gets. See a demo here (added in version 0.12.0) Sense clicks when the element moves less than 3 pixels - a common challenge is figuring out when a user is trying to click/tap an object rather than drag it, so if the mouse/touch moves less than 3 pixels from its starting position, it will be interpreted as a "click" and the onClick callback will be called (and a "click" event dispatched) without actually moving the element. You can define a different threshold using minimumMovement config property, like minimumMovement:6 for 6 pixels. All major browsers are supported including IE9+. IE8 lacks hitTest() support. See full documentation here. See our Codepen Draggable Collection here. To get ThrowPropsPlugin (for the momentum-based features), join Club GreenSock today. You'll be glad you did. If not, we'll gladly issue a full refund.
  24. GreenSock

    CustomWiggle

    CustomWiggle extends CustomEase (think of it like a wrapper that creates a CustomEase under the hood based on the variables you pass in), allowing you to not only set the number of wiggles, but also the type of wiggle (there are 5 types; see demo below). Advanced users can even alter the plotting of the wiggle curves along either axis using amplitudeEase and timingEase special properties. Demo: CustomWiggle Types See the Pen CustomWiggle Demo : resized by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Options wiggles (Integer) - number of oscillations back and forth. Default: 10 type (String) "easeOut" | "easeInOut" | "anticipate" | "uniform" | "random" - the type (or style) of wiggle (see demo above). Default: "easeOut" amplitudeEase (Ease) - provides advanced control over the shape of the amplitude (y-axis in the ease visualizer). You define an ease that controls the amplitude's progress from 1 toward 0 over the course of the tween. Defining an amplitudeEase (or timingEase) will override the "type" (think of the 5 "types" as convenient presets for amplitudeEase and timingEase combinations). See the example codepen to play around and visualize how it works. timingEase (Ease) - provides advanced control over how the waves are plotted over time (x-axis in the ease visualizer). Defining an timingEase (or amplitudeEase) will override the "type" (think of the 5 "types" as convenient presets for amplitudeEase and timingEase combinations). See the example codepen to play around and visualize how it works. How do you control the strength of the wiggle (or how far it goes)? Simply by setting the tween property values themselves. For example, a wiggle to rotation:30 would be stronger than rotation:10. Remember, and ease just controls the ratio of movement toward whatever value you supply for each property in your tween. Sample code //Create a wiggle with 6 oscillations (default type:"easeOut") CustomWiggle.create("myWiggle", {wiggles:6}); //now use it in an ease. "rotation" will wiggle to 30 and back just as much in the opposite direction, ending where it began. TweenMax.to(".class", 2, {rotation:30, ease:"myWiggle"}); //Create a 10-wiggle anticipation ease: CustomWiggle.create("funWiggle", {wiggles:10, type:"anticipate"}); TweenMax.to(".class", 2, {rotation:30, ease:"funWiggle"}); Wiggling isn't just for "rotation"; you can use it for any property. For example, you could create a swarm effect by using just 2 randomized wiggle tweens on "x" and "y", as demonstrated here. Where can I get it? CustomWiggle and CustomBounce are membership benefits of Club GreenSock ("Shockingly Green" and "Business Green" levels). It's our way of saying "thanks" to those who support GreenSock's ongoing efforts. Joining Club GreenSock gets you a bunch of other bonus plugins and tools like MorphSVGPlugin as well, so check out greensock.com/club/ for details and sign up today.
  25. GreenSock

    CustomBounce

    GSAP always had the tried-and-true Bounce.easeOut, but there was no way to customize how "bouncy" it was, nor could you get a synchronized squash and stretch effect during the bounce because: The "bounce" ease needs to stick to the ground momentarily at the point of the bounce while the squashing occurs. Bounce.easeOut offers no such customization. There was no way to create the corresponding [synchronized] scaleX/scaleY ease for the squashing/stretching. CustomEase solves this now, but it'd still be very difficult to manually draw that ease with all the points lined up in the right spots to match up with the bounces. With CustomBounce, you can set a few parameters and it'll create BOTH CustomEases for you (one for the bounce, and one [optionally] for the squash/stretch). Think of CustomBounce like a wrapper that creates a CustomEase under the hood based on the variables you pass in. Options strength (Number) - a number between 0 and 1 that determines how "bouncy" the ease is, so 0.9 will have a lot more bounces than 0.3. Default: 0.7 endAtStart (Boolean) - if true, the ease will end back where it started, allowing you to get an effect like an object sitting on the ground, leaping into the air, and bouncing back down to a stop. Default: false squash (Number) - controls how long the squash should last (the gap between bounces, when it appears "stuck"). Typically 2 is a good number, but 4 (as an example) would make the squash longer in relation to the rest of the ease. Default: 0 squashID (String) - the ID that should be assigned to the squash ease. The default is whatever the ID of the bounce is plus "-squash" appended to the end. For example, CustomBounce.create("hop", {strength:0.6, squash:2}) would default to a squash ease ID of "hop-squash". How do you get the bounce and the squash/stretch to work together? You'd use two tweens; one for the position ("y"), and the other for the scaleX/scaleY, with both running at the same time: //Create a custom bounce ease: CustomBounce.create("myBounce", {strength:0.6, squash:3, squashID:"myBounce-squash"}); //do the bounce by affecting the "y" property. TweenMax.from(".class", 2, {y:-200, ease:"myBounce"}); //and do the squash/stretch at the same time: TweenMax.to(".class", 2, {scaleX:140, scaleY:60, ease:"myBounce-squash", transformOrigin:"center bottom"}); See the Pen CustomBounce from GreenSock by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Where can I get it? CustomBounce and CustomWiggle are membership benefits of Club GreenSock ("Shockingly Green" and "Business Green" levels). It's our way of saying "thanks" to those who support GreenSock's ongoing efforts. Joining Club GreenSock gets you a bunch of other bonus plugins and tools like MorphSVGPlugin as well, so check out greensock.com/club/ for details and sign up today.
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