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Found 504 results

  1. Hi everyone, I was about to implement something like this in my current project, but I guess the GSAP codebase already have it, is it accessible for something else than DOM manipulation? Best.
  2. Hi all I created a prototype some time ago. It has many GSAP animations. I want to focus on the animations that appears when you scroll. For instance the shortcut icons. If you compare my prototype with the production site you'll see that the animations are running slower on the production site. Prototype: http://yousee.grandorf.dk/homepage/homepage-clean.html Production site: https://yousee.dk/ The code is the exact same: import inView from 'in-view'; import { TimelineLite, TweenLite } from 'gsap'; export function heroAnimation() { inView('.hero--animated').once('enter', () => { const items = ['.hero__title', '.hero__lead', '.hero__action', '.hero__legal-text']; const tl = new TimelineLite({delay: .4}); tl.staggerTo(items, 1, {opacity: 1, y: 0, ease: window.Power2.easeOut}, .15) .to('.hero__brand-logo-image', 2, {opacity: 1, ease: window.Power2.easeOut}); }); } export function shortcutAnimation() { inView('.gsap-shortcuts').on('enter', el => { const items = el.querySelectorAll('.ys-shortcut'); const tl = new TimelineLite({delay: .25}); tl.staggerTo(items, .3, {opacity: 1, scale: 1, ease: window.Back.easeOut}, .15); }); } export function mediaboxAnimation() { inView('.media-box--animated').on('enter', el => { TweenLite.to(el, 1, {opacity: 1, y: 0, ease: window.Power2.easeOut}); }); } export function mediacardAnimation() { inView('.gsap-media-card').on('enter', el => { const items = el.querySelectorAll('.media-card--animated'); const tl = new TimelineLite({delay: .5}); tl.staggerTo(items, .5, {opacity: 1, y: 0, ease: window.Power2.easeOut}, .2); }); } What can cause this issue? Any ideas or help will be appreciated a lot. Thanks If you focus on the icons staggering in - you should be able to see the difference:
  3. GreenSock

    RoundPropsPlugin

    If you'd like the inbetween values in a tween to always get rounded to the nearest integer, use the roundProps special property. Just pass in a comma-delimited String containing the property names that you'd like rounded. For example, if you're tweening the x, y, and alpha properties of mc and you want to round the x and y values (not alpha) every time the tween is rendered, you'd do: TweenMax.to(element, 2, {x:300, y:200, alpha:0.5, roundProps:"x,y"});
  4. GreenSock

    TimelineLite

    TimelineLite is a lightweight, intuitive timeline class for building and managing sequences of TweenLite, TweenMax, TimelineLite, and/or TimelineMax instances. You can think of a TimelineLite instance like a container where you place tweens (or other timelines) over the course of time. build sequences easily by adding tweens with methods like to(), from(), staggerFrom(), add(), and more. tweens can overlap as much as you want and you have complete control over where they get placed on the timeline. add labels, play(), stop(), seek(), restart(), and even reverse() smoothly anytime. nest timelines within timelines as deeply as you want. set the progress of the timeline using its progress() method. For example, to skip to the halfway point, set myTimeline.progress(0.5); tween the time() or progress() values to fastforward/rewind the timeline. You could even attach a slider to one of these properties to give the user the ability to drag forwards/backwards through the timeline. speed up or slow down the entire timeline using timeScale(). You can even tween this property to gradually speed up or slow down. add onComplete, onStart, onUpdate, and/or onReverseComplete callbacks using the constructor’s vars object. use the powerful add() method to add labels, callbacks, tweens and timelines to a timeline. base the timing on frames instead of seconds if you prefer. Please note, however, that the timeline’s timing mode dictates its childrens’ timing mode as well. kill the tweens of a particular object with killTweensOf() or get the tweens of an object with getTweensOf() or get all the tweens/timelines in the timeline with getChildren() If you need even more features like, repeat(), repeatDelay(), yoyo(), currentLabel(), getLabelsArray(), getLabelAfter(), getLabelBefore(), getActive(), tweenTo() and more, check out TimelineMax which extends TimelineLite. Sample Code //instantiate a TimelineLite var tl = new TimelineLite(); //add a from() tween at the beginning of the timline tl.from(head, 0.5, {left:100, opacity:0}); //add another tween immediately after tl.from(subhead, 0.5, {left:-100, opacity:0}); //use position parameter "+=0.5" to schedule next tween 0.5 seconds after previous tweens end tl.from(feature, 0.5, {scale:.5, autoAlpha:0}, "+=0.5"); //use position parameter "-=0.5" to schedule next tween 0.25 seconds before previous tweens end. //great for overlapping tl.from(description, 0.5, {left:100, autoAlpha:0}, "-=0.25"); //add a label 0.5 seconds later to mark the placement of the next tween tl.add("stagger", "+=0.5") //to jump to this label use: tl.play("stagger"); //stagger the animation of all icons with 0.1s between each tween's start time //this tween is added tl.staggerFrom(icons, 0.2, {scale:0, autoAlpha:0}, 0.1, "stagger"); Demo See the Pen TimelineLite Control : new GS.com by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Watch The video below will walk you through the types of problems TimelineLite solves and illustrate the flexibility and power of our core sequencing tool. Learn more in the TimelineLite docs. For even more sequencing power and control take a look at TimelineMax.
  5. Hi guys! I'm learning GSAP a few months, with the help of community, this is my first work using GSAP, in progress yet. Thanks all for help! And i have another question, about page transitions, shared element transitions between pages. See website reference at link: https://alfacharlie.co/ See the effect of transitions between pages, the softness the animations. I used the barba.js in html + css and it worked, but not working fine in wordpress, someone to help me achieve page transitions in wordpress site?
  6. GreenSock

    CSSRulePlugin

    Allows TweenLite and TweenMax to animate the raw style sheet rules which affect all objects of a particular selector rather than affecting an individual DOM element's style (that's what the CSSPlugin is for). For example, if you have a CSS class named ".myClass" that sets background-color to "#FF0000", you could tween that to a different color and ALL of the objects on the page that use ".myClass" would have their background color change. Typically it is best to use the regular CSSPlugin to animate css-related properties of individual elements so that you can get very precise control over each object, but sometimes it can be useful to tween the global rules themselves instead. For example, pseudo elements (like :after, :before, etc. are impossible to reference directly in JavaScript, but you can animate them using CSSRulePlugin as shown below. See the Pen CSSRulePlugin by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Learn more in the CSSRulePlugin documentation.
  7. GreenSock

    CSSPlugin

    With the help of the CSSPlugin, GSAP can animate almost any css-related property of DOM elements including the obvious things like width, height, margin, padding, top, left, and more plus more interesting things like transforms (rotation, scaleX, scaleY, skewX, skewY, x, y, rotationX, and rotationY), colors, opacity, and lots more. Don't forget to load the CSSPlugin to enable these capabilities. Normally, css-specific properties would need to be wrapped in their own object and passed in like TweenLite.to(element, 1, {css:{left:"100px", top:"50px"}}); so that the engine knows that those properties belong to the CSSPlugin, but because animating DOM elements in the browser is so common, TweenLite and TweenMax (as of version 1.8.0) automatically check to see if the target is a DOM element and if it is (and you haven't already defined a "css" object in the vars parameter), the engine creates that css object for you and shifts any properties that aren't reserved (like onComplete, ease, delay, etc. or plugin keywords like scrollTo, raphael, easel, etc.) into that css object when the tween renders for the first time. In the code examples below, we'll use the more concise style that omits the css:{} object but be aware that either style is acceptable. See the Pen CSSPlugin by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Learn more in the CSSPlugin documentation.
  8. SplitText is an easy to use JavaScript utility that allows you to split HTML text into characters, words and lines. Its easy to use, extremely flexible and works all the way back to IE8. Although SplitText is naturally a good fit for creating HTML5 text animation effects with GreenSock's animation tools, it has no dependencies on GSAP, jQuery or any other libraries. .videoNav { color:#555; margin-top: 12px; } 0:00 Intro 0:21 SplitText solves problems 2:01 Basic Split 3:34 Configuration options 6:35 Animation View the JS panel in the Codepen demo above to see how easy it is to: Split text into words and characters. Pass the chars array into a TweenMax staggerFrom() tween for animation. Revert the text back to its pre-split state when you are done animating. Additional features and notes You can specify a new class to be added to each split element and also add an auto-incrementing class like .word1, .word2, .word3 etc. View demo You don't have to manually insert <br>tags, SplitText honors natural line breaks. SplitText doesn't force non-breaking spaces into the divs like many other solutions on the web do. SplitText is not designed to work with SVG <text> nodes. Learn more in our detailed SplitText API documentation. Please visit our SplitText Codepen Collection for more demos of SplitText in action. Where can I get it? SplitText is a membership benefit of Club GreenSock ("Shockingly Green" and "Business Green" levels). Joining Club GreenSock gets you a bunch of other bonus plugins and tools like ThrowPropsPlugin as well, so check out greensock.com/club/ to get details and sign up today. The support of club members has been critical to the success of GreenSock - it's what makes building these tools possible.
  9. GreenSock

    GSDevTools

    Your animation workflow is about to get a major boost. GSDevTools gives you a visual UI for interacting with and debugging GSAP animations, complete with advanced playback controls, keyboard shortcuts, global synchronization and more. Jump to specific scenes, set in/out points, play in slow motion to reveal intricate details, and even switch to a "minimal" mode on small screens. GSDevTools makes building and reviewing GSAP animations simply delightful. Get Started Load the JavaScript file //be sure to use a path that works in your dev environment Requirements GSDevTools requires TweenMax (well, actually just CSSPlugin, TweenLite, TimelineLite, AttrPlugin which are all included in TweenMax) version 1.20.3 or higher. It also uses Draggable under the hood, but in order to minimize hassle for end users, Draggable is included inside the GSDevTools file itself. How do I get it? GSDevTools is available to Club GreenSock members ("Shockingly Green" and above). Just download GSAP with the bonus files zip from your Dashboard. Try GSDevTools for free on CodePen. FAQ Why is my Global Timeline 1000 seconds long? That means you've probably got an infinitely repeating animation somewhere. GSDevTools caps its duration at 1000 seconds. Scrubbing to Infinity is awkward. Does loading GSDevTools impact runtime performance? Since it must monitor and record the root timeline, yes, there is a slight performance hit but probably not noticeable. Keep in mind that usually you'll only load GSDevTools while you're developing/reviewing your animations and then remove it when you're ready to launch, so ultimately it shouldn't be much of a factor anyway. Why isn't GSDevTools in the CDN or Github repo? Because it's a membership benefit of Club GreenSock. It's a way for us to give back to those who support our ongoing development efforts. That's why we've been able to continue innovating for over a decade. See https://greensock.com/why-license for details about our philosophy. Does GSDevTools work with other animation libraries? Nope, it depends on some unique capabilities baked into the GSAP architecture. What will I do with all the time this tool saves me? Take up a new hobby, ponder deep philosophical questions, make cookies - it's up to you.
  10. GreenSock

    jquery.gsap.js

    Good news for anyone using jQuery.animate() - the new jquery.gsap.js plugin allows you to have GSAP take control under the hood so that your animations perform better; no need to change any of your code. Plus GSAP adds numerous capabilities, allowing you to tween colors, 2D transforms (rotation, scaleX, scaleY, skewX, skewY, x, y), 3D transforms (rotationX, rotationY, z, perspective), backgroundPosition, boxShadow, and lots more. You can even animate to a different className! This plugin makes it very easy to audition GSAP in your project without needing to learn a new API. We still highly recommend learning the regular GSAP API because it's much more flexible, robust, and object-oriented than jQuery.animate(), but for practical purposes this plugin delivers a bunch of power with almost zero effort. Benefits Up to 20x faster than jQuery's native animate() method. See the interactive speed comparison for yourself. Works exactly the same as the regular jQuery.animate() method. Same syntax. No need to change your code. Just load the plugin (and TweenMax or TweenLite & CSSPlugin) and you're done. Adds the ability to animate additional properties (without vendor prefixes): colors (backgroundColor, borderColor, color, etc.) boxShadow textShadow 2D transforms like rotation, scaleX, scaleY, x, y, skewX, and skewY, including 2D transformOrigin functionality 3D transforms like rotationY rotationX, z, and perspective, including 3D transformOrigin functionality borderRadius (without the need to define each corner and use browser prefixes) className which allows you to define a className (or use “+=” or “-=” to add/remove a class) and have the engine figure out which properties are different and animate the differences using whatever ease and duration you want. backgroundPosition clip Animate along Bezier curves, even rotating along with the path or plotting a smoothly curved Bezier through a set of points you provide (including 3D!). GSAP’s Bezier system is super flexible in that it’s not just for x/y/z coordinates – it can handle ANY set of properties. Plus it will automatically adjust the movement so that it’s correctly proportioned the entire way, avoiding a common problem that plagues Bezier animation systems. You can define Bezier data as Cubic or Quadratic or raw anchor points. Add tons of easing options including proprietary SlowMo and SteppedEase along with all the industry standards When animating the rotation of an object, automatically go in the shortest direction (clockwise or counter-clockwise) using shortRotation, shortRotationX, or shortRotationY For a detailed comparison between jQuery and GSAP, check out the cage match. Usage Download the files (requires version 1.8.0 (or later) of TweenMax or TweenLite!) and then add the appropriate script tags to your page. The plugin file (jquery.gsap.min.js) itself does NOT include GSAP because you get to choose which files you want to load depending on the features you want. The simplest way to get all the goodies is by loading TweenMax (which includes TweenLite, CSSPlugin, TimelineLite, TimelineMax, EasePack, BezierPlugin, and RoundPropsPlugin too). For example, assuming you put the TweenMax.min.js file into a folder named "js" which is in the same directory as your HTML file, you'd simply place the following code into your HTML file: All the goodies: <script src="js/TweenMax.min.js"></script> <script src="js/jquery.gsap.min.js"></script> If, however, you're more concerned about file size and only want to use TweenLite, CSSPlugin (for animating DOM elements), and some extra eases, here is a common set of script tags: Lightweight: <script src="js/plugins/CSSPlugin.min.js"></script> <script src="js/easing/EasePack.min.js"></script> <script src="js/TweenLite.min.js"></script> <script src="js/jquery.gsap.min.js"></script> Then, to animate things, you can use the regular jQuery.animate() method like this: //tween all elements with class "myClass" to top:100px and left:200px over the course of 3 seconds $(".myClass").animate({top:100, left:200}, 3000); //do the same thing, but with a Strong.easeOut ease $(".myClass").animate({top:100, left:200}, {duration:3000, easing:"easeOutStrong"}); //tween width to 50% and then height to 200px (sequenced) and then call myFunction $(".myClass").animate({width:"50%"}, 2000).animate({height:"200px"}, {duration:3000, complete:myFunction}); See jQuery's API docs for details about the syntax and options available with the animate() method. And yes, the jQuery.stop() method works too. Caveats If you define any of the following in the animate() call, it will revert to the native jQuery.animate() method in order to maximize compatibility (meaning no GSAP speed boost and no GSAP-specific special properties will work in that particular call): a "step" function - providing the parameters to the callback that jQuery normally does would be too costly performance-wise. One of the biggest goals of GSAP is optimized performance; We'd strongly recommend NOT using a "step" function for that reason. Instead, you can use an onUpdate if you want a function to be called each time the values are updated. Anything with a value of "show", "hide", "toggle", "scrollTop" or "scrollLeft". jQuery handles these in a unique way and we don't want to add the code into CSSPlugin that would be required to support them natively in GSAP. If skipGSAP:true is found in the "properties" parameter, it will force things to fall back to the native jQuery.animate() method. So if a particular animation is acting different than what you're used to with the native jQuery.animate() method, you can just force the fallback using this special property. Like $(".myClass").animate({scrollTop:200, skipGSAP:true}); This is our first crack at a jQuery plugin, so please let us know if anything breaks or if you have ideas for improvement.
  11. GreenSock

    CustomWiggle

    CustomWiggle extends CustomEase (think of it like a wrapper that creates a CustomEase under the hood based on the variables you pass in), allowing you to not only set the number of wiggles, but also the type of wiggle (there are 5 types; see demo below). Advanced users can even alter the plotting of the wiggle curves along either axis using amplitudeEase and timingEase special properties. Demo: CustomWiggle Types See the Pen CustomWiggle Demo : resized by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Options wiggles (Integer) - number of oscillations back and forth. Default: 10 type (String) "easeOut" | "easeInOut" | "anticipate" | "uniform" | "random" - the type (or style) of wiggle (see demo above). Default: "easeOut" amplitudeEase (Ease) - provides advanced control over the shape of the amplitude (y-axis in the ease visualizer). You define an ease that controls the amplitude's progress from 1 toward 0 over the course of the tween. Defining an amplitudeEase (or timingEase) will override the "type" (think of the 5 "types" as convenient presets for amplitudeEase and timingEase combinations). See the example codepen to play around and visualize how it works. timingEase (Ease) - provides advanced control over how the waves are plotted over time (x-axis in the ease visualizer). Defining an timingEase (or amplitudeEase) will override the "type" (think of the 5 "types" as convenient presets for amplitudeEase and timingEase combinations). See the example codepen to play around and visualize how it works. How do you control the strength of the wiggle (or how far it goes)? Simply by setting the tween property values themselves. For example, a wiggle to rotation:30 would be stronger than rotation:10. Remember, and ease just controls the ratio of movement toward whatever value you supply for each property in your tween. Sample code //Create a wiggle with 6 oscillations (default type:"easeOut") CustomWiggle.create("myWiggle", {wiggles:6}); //now use it in an ease. "rotation" will wiggle to 30 and back just as much in the opposite direction, ending where it began. TweenMax.to(".class", 2, {rotation:30, ease:"myWiggle"}); //Create a 10-wiggle anticipation ease: CustomWiggle.create("funWiggle", {wiggles:10, type:"anticipate"}); TweenMax.to(".class", 2, {rotation:30, ease:"funWiggle"}); Wiggling isn't just for "rotation"; you can use it for any property. For example, you could create a swarm effect by using just 2 randomized wiggle tweens on "x" and "y", as demonstrated here. Where can I get it? CustomWiggle and CustomBounce are membership benefits of Club GreenSock ("Shockingly Green" and "Business Green" levels). It's our way of saying "thanks" to those who support GreenSock's ongoing efforts. Joining Club GreenSock gets you a bunch of other bonus plugins and tools like MorphSVGPlugin as well, so check out greensock.com/club/ for details and sign up today.
  12. GreenSock

    CustomBounce

    GSAP always had the tried-and-true Bounce.easeOut, but there was no way to customize how "bouncy" it was, nor could you get a synchronized squash and stretch effect during the bounce because: The "bounce" ease needs to stick to the ground momentarily at the point of the bounce while the squashing occurs. Bounce.easeOut offers no such customization. There was no way to create the corresponding [synchronized] scaleX/scaleY ease for the squashing/stretching. CustomEase solves this now, but it'd still be very difficult to manually draw that ease with all the points lined up in the right spots to match up with the bounces. With CustomBounce, you can set a few parameters and it'll create BOTH CustomEases for you (one for the bounce, and one [optionally] for the squash/stretch). Think of CustomBounce like a wrapper that creates a CustomEase under the hood based on the variables you pass in. Options strength (Number) - a number between 0 and 1 that determines how "bouncy" the ease is, so 0.9 will have a lot more bounces than 0.3. Default: 0.7 endAtStart (Boolean) - if true, the ease will end back where it started, allowing you to get an effect like an object sitting on the ground, leaping into the air, and bouncing back down to a stop. Default: false squash (Number) - controls how long the squash should last (the gap between bounces, when it appears "stuck"). Typically 2 is a good number, but 4 (as an example) would make the squash longer in relation to the rest of the ease. Default: 0 squashID (String) - the ID that should be assigned to the squash ease. The default is whatever the ID of the bounce is plus "-squash" appended to the end. For example, CustomBounce.create("hop", {strength:0.6, squash:2}) would default to a squash ease ID of "hop-squash". How do you get the bounce and the squash/stretch to work together? You'd use two tweens; one for the position ("y"), and the other for the scaleX/scaleY, with both running at the same time: //Create a custom bounce ease: CustomBounce.create("myBounce", {strength:0.6, squash:3, squashID:"myBounce-squash"}); //do the bounce by affecting the "y" property. TweenMax.from(".class", 2, {y:-200, ease:"myBounce"}); //and do the squash/stretch at the same time: TweenMax.to(".class", 2, {scaleX:140, scaleY:60, ease:"myBounce-squash", transformOrigin:"center bottom"}); See the Pen CustomBounce from GreenSock by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Where can I get it? CustomBounce and CustomWiggle are membership benefits of Club GreenSock ("Shockingly Green" and "Business Green" levels). It's our way of saying "thanks" to those who support GreenSock's ongoing efforts. Joining Club GreenSock gets you a bunch of other bonus plugins and tools like MorphSVGPlugin as well, so check out greensock.com/club/ for details and sign up today.
  13. Hi there, First post here! I'm working on a React/Gatsby app which references this tutorial. I've solved most of the issues except for the following error: TypeError: Cannot read property 'easeOut' of undefined I've tried a bunch of variations of imports destructuring etc but Quad is never defined. My code is as follows: import React, { Component } from "react" import Layout from "../components/layout" import SEO from "../components/seo" import { TweenMax, Quad, Sine, Back } from "gsap/TweenMax" const prettyLetter = require( 'pretty-letters' ) export default class IndexPage extends Component { componentDidMount() { var options = { groupClass: 'char-group-', groupTag: 'span' } prettyLetter('a', options) const lineEq = (y2, y1, x2, x1, currentVal) => { // y = mx + b var m = (y2 - y1) / (x2 - x1), b = y1 - m * x1 return m * currentVal + b } const lerp = (a,b,n) => (1 - n) * a + n * b const distance = (x1,x2,y1,y2) => { var a = x1 - x2 var b = y1 - y2 return Math.hypot(a,b) } const getMousePos = (e) => { let posx = 0 let posy = 0 if (!e) e = window.event if (e.pageX || e.pageY) { posx = e.pageX posy = e.pageY } else if (e.clientX || e.clientY) { posx = e.clientX + document.body.scrollLeft + document.documentElement.scrollLeft posy = e.clientY + document.body.scrollTop + document.documentElement.scrollTop } return { x : posx, y : posy } } let winsize; const calcWinsize = () => winsize = {width: window.innerWidth, height: window.innerHeight} calcWinsize() window.addEventListener('resize', calcWinsize) // The feDisplacementMap element const feDisplacementMapEl = document.querySelector('feDisplacementMap') class Menu { constructor() { this.DOM = { svg: document.querySelector('svg.distort'), menu: document.querySelector('nav.menu') } // The images (one per menu link) this.DOM.imgs = Array.from(Object.assign.apply(Object, [this.DOM.svg.querySelectorAll('g > image')])) // The menu links this.DOM.menuLinks = Array.from(Object.assign.apply(Object, [this.DOM.menu.querySelectorAll('.menu__link')])) // Mouse position this.mousePos = {x: winsize.width/2, y: winsize.height/2} // Last mouse positions (one to consider for the image translation movement, another for the scale value of the feDisplacementMap element) this.lastMousePos = { translation: {x: winsize.width/2, y: winsize.height/2}, displacement: {x: 0, y: 0} } // feDisplacementMap scale value this.dmScale = 0 // Current menu link position this.current = -1 this.initEvents() requestAnimationFrame(() => this.render()) } initEvents() { // Update mouse position window.addEventListener('mousemove', ev => this.mousePos = getMousePos(ev)) this.DOM.menuLinks.forEach((item, pos) => { const letters = Array.from(Object.assign.apply(Object, [item.querySelectorAll('span')])) const mouseenterFn = () => { // Hide the previous menu image if (this.current !== -1) { TweenMax.set(this.DOM.imgs[this.current], { opacity: 0 }); } // Update current this.current = pos // Now fade in the new image if we are entering the menu or just set the new image's opacity to 1 if switching between menu items if (this.fade) { TweenMax.to(this.DOM.imgs[this.current], 0.5, { ease: Quad.easeOut, opacity: 1 }) this.fade = false } else { TweenMax.set(this.DOM.imgs[this.current], { opacity: 1 }) } // Letters effect TweenMax.staggerTo(letters, 0.2, { ease: Sine.easeInOut, y: this.lastMousePos.translation.y < this.mousePos.y ? 30 : -30, startAt: {opacity: 1, y: 0}, opacity: 0, yoyo: true, yoyoEase: Back.easeOut, repeat: 1, stagger: { grid: [1,letters.length-1], from: 'center', amount: 0.12 } }) } item.addEventListener('mouseenter', mouseenterFn) }) const mousemenuenterFn = () => this.fade = true const mousemenuleaveFn = () => TweenMax.to(this.DOM.imgs[this.current], .2, { ease: Quad.easeOut, opacity: 0 }) this.DOM.menu.addEventListener('mouseenter', mousemenuenterFn) this.DOM.menu.addEventListener('mouseleave', mousemenuleaveFn) } render() { // Translate the image on mousemove this.lastMousePos.translation.x = lerp(this.lastMousePos.translation.x, this.mousePos.x, 0.2) this.lastMousePos.translation.y = lerp(this.lastMousePos.translation.y, this.mousePos.y, 0.2) this.DOM.svg.style.transform = `translateX(${(this.lastMousePos.translation.x-winsize.width/2)}px) translateY(${this.lastMousePos.translation.y-winsize.height/2}px)` // Scale goes from 0 to 50 for mouseDistance values between 0 to 140 this.lastMousePos.displacement.x = lerp(this.lastMousePos.displacement.x, this.mousePos.x, 0.1) this.lastMousePos.displacement.y = lerp(this.lastMousePos.displacement.y, this.mousePos.y, 0.1) const mouseDistance = distance(this.lastMousePos.displacement.x, this.mousePos.x, this.lastMousePos.displacement.y, this.mousePos.y) this.dmScale = Math.min(lineEq(50, 0, 140, 0, mouseDistance), 50) feDisplacementMapEl.scale.baseVal = this.dmScale requestAnimationFrame(() => this.render()) } } new Menu() } render() { return ( <Layout> <SEO title="Home" keywords={[`Artist`, `Brisbane-based`, `drawing`, `painting`, `watercolour`, `sculpture`, `installation`, `video`, `embroidery`]} /> <div style={{ paddingBottom: 100 }}> <svg className="distort" width="350" height="450" viewBox="0 0 350 450"> <filter id="distortionFilter"> <feTurbulence type="turbulence" baseFrequency="0.07 0.01" numOctaves="5" seed="2" stitchTiles="stitch" x="0%" y="0%" width="100%" height="100%" result="noise"/> <feDisplacementMap in="SourceGraphic" in2="noise" scale="0" xChannelSelector="R" yChannelSelector="B" x="0%" y="0%" width="100%" height="100%" filterUnits="userSpaceOnUse"/> </filter> <g filter="url(#distortionFilter)"> <image className="distort__img" x="50" y="50" xlinkHref={require('../images/1.jpg')} height="350" width="250"/> <image className="distort__img" x="50" y="50" xlinkHref={require('../images/2.jpg')} height="350" width="250"/> </g> </svg> <nav className="menu"> <a href="#" className="menu__link">Shanghai</a> <a href="#" className="menu__link">Taipei</a> <a href="#" className="menu__link">Bangkok</a> <a href="#" className="menu__link">Kyoto</a> </nav> </div> </Layout> ) } }
  14. With some animation engines it can be frustrating trying to get something to rotate in a specific direction. With GSAP you can explicitly set the direction or let GSAP figure out the shortest distance. Watch the video Interactive demo See the Pen DirectionalRotation Visualizer by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Check out the DirectionalRotation Plugin docs for more info.
  15. You may be surprised by how much work GSAP does under the hood to make animating transforms intuitive and performant. This video explains the top 10 reasons you should be using GSAP to animate transform-related values like scale, rotation, x, y, etc. Watch the video Independent control of each component (x, y, scaleX, scaleY, rotation, etc.) Physics-based animations and dragging, plus advanced easing like Elastic and Bounce Snap to any increment or set of values Query values anytime with _gsTransform Relative values ("+=" and "-=") Directional rotation (clockwise, counter-clockwise, or shortest) Two different skew types ("compensated" and "simple") Consistency across browsers, especially with SVG Animate along a path Sequencing and on-the-fly controls All of these features are baked into CSSPlugin (which is included inside TweenMax). See the docs for more information. Happy tweening!
  16. MorphSVG's default settings typically deliver beautiful results but sometimes you may need to tweak things to get a certain effect or avoid weird transitional states or kinks. This video explains advanced features of MorphSVGPlugin that give you plenty of flexibility. Watch the video For more information and plenty of interactive demos, check out the MorphSVG docs. Happy tweening!
  17. GreenSock

    GSAP 2.1 Released

    There are plenty of large and small updates in GSAP 2.1; here are a few highlights... Advanced staggers Advanced staggering makes it surprisingly simple to get rich, organic timing effects with very little code. Each tween's start time can be distributed according to any ease and/or based on how close each element is to a position in the list. For example, you can have things emanate outward from the "center" or a certain index. It'll even accommodate grids, complete with auto-calculated columns and rows (great for responsive layouts)! The interactive demo below explains it all visually (notice there's an embedded video explanation too): See the Pen Advanced Staggers in GSAP by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. So setting up an advanced stagger is as simple as: TweenMax.staggerTo(".yourClass", 2, { scale:0.1, y:40, stagger:{ amount: 2, //total seconds to divide up among staggers from: "center", //or an index value. Determines where staggers originate grid:"auto", //or [columns, rows] ease: Power1.easeIn //determines spacing } }); Parts of the advanced staggering features were prompted by suggestions from GSAP users inspired by Julian Garnier's API in anime, so we tip our hat to his efforts. He's a great contributor to the animation community. MorphSVG type:"rotational" There's an entirely new type of morph that leverages rotational and length data to move anchors and control points which can deliver cleaner, more intuitive morphs. Plus it completely eliminates kinks that can occasionally creep in with linear interpolation. The video below explains. Watch the video To tap into this new style of morphing, just set the type:"rotational" TweenMax.to("#shape1", 2, { morphSVG:{ shape:"#shape2", type:"rotational" } }); Or set it as the default to affect all morphs: MorphSVGPlugin.defaultType = "rotational"; //default is "linear" Demo 1: preventing kinks See the Pen MorphSVG type:'rotational' for preventing kinks by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Demo 2: more natural morphs See the Pen MorphSVG type:'rotational' for more natural morphs by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Fixing odd results by declaring a custom origin The default origin is 50% 50% which usually works great, but sometimes the rotations around that point look odd, as shown below. In cases like this, it's best to experiment and set your own custom origin to improve things even more. We created a findMorphOrigin() utility function which is in the codepen below (and you can copy it into your own) which allows you to simply feed in a start and end shape and then it'll superimpose an origin that you can drag around and see exactly how it affects the morph! In the demo below, go into the JS panel and un-comment the findMorphIndex() line and you'll see exactly how this works. Drag the origin around and watch how it affects things. See the Pen MorphSVG: fixing origin weirdness by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Note: you must load Draggable for this to work. So to set a custom origin, it would look like: TweenMax.to("#shape1", 2, { morphSVG:{ shape:"#shape2", type:"rotational", origin:"20% 60%" //or to define a different origin for the start and end shapes, "20% 60%,45% 30%" } }); Is the new type:"rotational" a silver bullet for making every morph perfectly intuitive? No, but it's a great option that delivers more natural morphs in many cases. MorphSVG canvas rendering SVG is fantastic, but sometimes developers have a canvas-based project (often for rendering performance reasons). They haven't been able to leverage the intuitive morphing that MorphSVG provides in a highly-performant way...until now. The new MorphSVG plugin allows you to define a render function that'll be called every time the path updates, and it will receive two parameters: rawPath [array]: A RawPath is essentially an array containing an array for each contiguous segment with alternating x, y, x, y cubic bezier data. It's like an SVG <path> where there's one segment (array) for each "M" command; that segment (array) contains all of the cubic bezier coordinates in alternating x/y format (just like SVG path data) in raw numeric form which is nice because that way you don't have to parse a long string and convert things. For example, this SVG <path> has two separate segments because there are two "M" commands: <path d="M0,0 C10,20,15,30,5,18 M0,100 C50,120,80,110,100,100" /> So the resulting RawPath would be: [ [0, 0, 10, 20, 15, 30, 5, 18], [0, 100, 50, 120, 80, 110, 100, 100] ] For simplicity, the example above only has one cubic bezier in each segment, but there could be an unlimited quantity inside each segment. No matter what path commands are in the original <path> data string (cubic, quadratic, arc, lines, whatever), the resulting RawPath will ALWAYS be cubic beziers. target [object]: the target of the tween (usually a <path>) This means you can even render morphs to super high-performance engines like PixiJS or anything that'll allow you to draw cubic beziers! Demo: MorphSVG canvas rendering See the Pen MorphSVG canvas rendering by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Here's an example of a tween and a render function that'd draw the morphing shape to canvas: var canvas = document.querySelector("canvas"), ctx = canvas.getContext("2d"), vw = canvas.width = window.innerWidth, vh = canvas.height = window.innerHeight; ctx.fillStyle = "#ccc"; TweenMax.to("#hippo", 2, { morphSVG:{ shape:"#circle", render:draw } }); function draw(rawPath, target) { var l, segment, j, i; ctx.clearRect(0, 0, vw, vh); ctx.beginPath(); for (j = 0; j To set a default render method for all tweens: MorphSVGPlugin.defaultRender = yourFunction; Got questions? If you haven't checked out the forums, you're missing out! It's a great place to get your questions answered and participate in the community. We carefully monitor and answer questions there. Changelog View the full changelog here (there's a lot). Happy tweening! DOWNLOAD GSAP NOW
  18. Have you ever wondered how to get the position, rotation or other transform-related properties that were animated with GSAP? It's actually quite simple: they're all neatly organized and updated in the _gsTransform object which GSAP attaches directly to the target element! Watch the video Let's set the rotation of the logo to 20 degrees. var logo = document.querySelector("#logo"); TweenMax.set(logo, {rotation:20}); GSAP applies that rotation via an inline style using a transform matrix (2d or 3d). If you were to inspect the element after the rotation was set you would see: <img style="transform: matrix(0.93969, 0.34202, -0.34202, 0.93969, 0, 0);" id="logo" src="..." > Not many humans would be able to discern the rotation from those values. Don't worry - the _gsTransform object has all the discrete values in human-readable form! console.log(logo._gsTransform); The console will show you an Object with the following properties and values: Object { force3D: "auto", perspective: 0, rotation: 20, rotationX: 0, rotationY: 0, scaleX: 1, scaleY: 1, scaleZ: 1, skewType: "compensated", skewX: 0, skewY: 0, svg: false, x: 0, xOffset: 0, xPercent: 0, y: 0, yOffset: 0, yPercent: 0, z: 0, zOrigin: 0 } To grab the rotation of the logo you would simply use: logo._gsTransform.rotation Click "Edit on CodePen" and open the console to see how it works See the Pen _gsTransform demo by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Get transform values during an animation Use an onUpdate callback to read the values during an animation: var logo = document.querySelector("#logo"); var output = document.querySelector("#output"); TweenMax.to(logo, 4, {rotationY:360, x:600, transformPerspective:800, transformOrigin:"50% 50%", onUpdate:showValues, ease:Linear.easeNone}); function showValues() { output.innerHTML = "x: " + parseInt(logo._gsTransform.x) + " rotation: " + parseInt(logo._gsTransform.rotationY); //you can also target the element being tweened using this.target //console.log(this.target.x); } The demo below illustrates how to read transform values during an animation. See the Pen _gsTransform demo: animation by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. We strongly recommend always setting transform data through GSAP for optimized for performance (GSAP can cache values). Unfortunately, the browser doesn't always make it clear how certain values should be applied. Browsers report computed values as matrices which contain ambiguous rotational/scale data; the matrix for 90 and 450 degrees is the same and a rotation of 180 degrees has the same matrix as a scaleX of -1 (there are many examples). However, when you set the values directly through GSAP, it's crystal clear. Happy tweening!
  19. A guest post from Rodrigo Hernando, a talented animator/developer who has years of experience solving animation challenges. Rodrigo is a seasoned React developer and he was one of our first moderators, serving the GreenSock community since 2011 with his expert help and friendly charm. Preface This guide assumes a basic knowledge of both the GreenSock Animation Platform (GSAP) and React, as well as some common tools used to develop a React app. As GSAP becomes the de-facto standard for creating rich animations and UI's on the web, developers must learn how to integrate it with other tools like React which has become popular because it allows developers to write their apps in a modular, declarative and re-usable fashion. As a moderator in the GreenSock forums, I've noticed that there are a few common hurdles to getting the two working together seamlessly, like referencing the DOM element appropriately, doing things The React Way, etc. which is why I'm writing this article. We won't delve into how a React app should be structured since our focus is on using GSAP, but the techniques used throughout this guide follow the official guidelines and have been reviewed by maintainers of the React Transition Group tool. We'll start simple and get more complex toward the end. How GSAP Works GSAP basically updates numeric properties of an object many times per second which creates the illusion of animation. For DOM elements, GSAP updates the the inline style properties. const myElement = document.getElementById("my-element"); TweenLite.to(myElement, 1, {width: 100, backgroundColor: "red"}); As you can see this means that we need access to the actual DOM node rendered in the document in order to pass it to the TweenLite.to() method. How React Works Explaining how React works is beyond the scope of this article, but let's focus on how React gets the JSX code we write and puts that in the DOM. <div className="my-class"> Some content here </div> With React, we normally don't pass an id attribute to the element because we use a declarative way to access methods, instances, props and state. It's through the component's (or the application's) state that we can change how things are represented in the DOM. There's no direct DOM manipulation, so typically there's no need to actually access the DOM. The React team has given developers ways to access the DOM nodes when needed, and the API changed a bit over the years as React matured. At this time (September, 2018) the latest version of React (16.4.2) allows developers to use Refs to access the DOM nodes. In this guide we'll mainly use the Callback Refs to create a reference to the DOM node and then feed it into GSAP animations because it's much faster for GSAP to directly manipulate properties rather than funneling them through React's state machine. Creating Our First Animation We'll use the ref to access the DOM node and the componentDidMount() lifecycle method of the component to create our first animation, because this will guarantee that the node has been added to the DOM tree and is ready to be passed into a GSAP animation. class MyComponent extends Component { constructor(props){ super(props); // reference to the DOM node this.myElement = null; // reference to the animation this.myTween = null; } componentDidMount(){ // use the node ref to create the animation this.myTween = TweenLite.to(this.myElement, 1, {x: 100, y: 100}); } render(){ return <div ref={div => this.myElement = div} />; } } Not that difficult, right? Let's go through the code so we can understand what is happening. First when we create an instance of this class, two properties are added to it: myElement and myTween, but both are equal to null. Why? Because at this point the node has not been added to the DOM tree and if we try to pass this node to a GSAP animation, we'll get an error indicating that GSAP cannot tween a null target. After the new instance has been initialized, the render() method runs. In the render method we're using the ref attribute that is basically a function that has a single parameter – the DOM node being added to the DOM tree. At this point we update the reference to the DOM node created in the class constructor. After that, this reference is no longer null and can be used anywhere we need it in our component. Finally, the componentDidMount() method runs and updates the reference to myTween with a TweenLite tween whose target is the internal reference to the DOM node that should animate. Simple, elegant and very React-way of us! It is worth mentioning that we could have created a one-run-animation by not creating a reference to the TweenLite tween in the constructor method. We could have just created a tween in the componentDidMount method and it would run immediately, like this: componentDidMount(){ TweenLite.to(this.myElement, 1, {x: 100, y: 100}); } The main benefit of storing a TweenLite tween as a reference in the component, is that this pattern allows us to use any of the methods GSAP has to offer like: play(), pause(), reverse(), restart(), seek(), change the speed (timeScale), etc., to get full control of the animations. Also this approach allows us to create any GSAP animation (TweenLite, TweenMax, TimelineLite, etc.) in the constructor. For example, we could use a timeline in order to create a complex animation: constructor(props){ super(props); this.myElement = null; this.myTween = TimelineLite({paused: true}); } componentDidMount(){ this.myTween .to(this.myElement, 0.5, {x: 100}) .to(this.myElement, 0.5, {y: 100, rotation: 180}) .play(); } With this approach we create a paused Timeline in the constructor and add the individual tweens using the shorthand methods. Since the Timeline was paused initially, we play it after adding all the tweens to it. We could also leave it paused and control it somewhere else in our app. The following example shows this technique: Simple Tween Demo Animating a Group of Elements One of the perks of using React is that allows us to add a group of elements using the array.map() method, which reduces the amount of HTML we have to write. This also can help us when creating an animation for all those elements. Let's say that you want to animate a group of elements onto the screen in a staggered fashion. It's simple: constructor(props){ super(props); this.myTween = new TimelineLite({paused: true}); this.myElements = []; } componentDidMount(){ this.myTween.staggerTo(this.myElements, 0.5, {y: 0, autoAlpha: 1}, 0.1); } render(){ return <div> <ul> {elementsArray.map((element, index) => <li key={element.id} ref={li => this.myElements[index] = li} > {element.name} </li>)} </ul> </div>; } This looks a bit more complex but we're using the same pattern to access each DOM node. The only difference is that instead of using a single reference for each element, we add each element to an array. In the componentDidMount() method we use TimelineLite.staggerTo() and GSAP does its magic to create a staggered animation! Multiple Elements Demo Creating a Complex Sequence We won't always get all the elements in an array so sometimes we might need to create a complex animation using different elements. Just like in the first example we store a reference in the constructor for each element and create our timeline in the componentDidMount() method: Timeline Sequence Demo Note how in this example we use a combination of methods. Most of the elements are stored as a an instance property using this.element = null, but also we're adding a group of elements using an array.map(). Instead of using the map() callback to create tweens in the timeline (which is completely possible), we're adding them to an array that is passed in the staggerFrom() method to create the stagger effect. Animating Via State The most commonly used pattern to update a React app is through changing the state of its components. So it's easy to control when and how elements are animated based on the app state. It's not very difficult to listen to state changes and control a GSAP animation depending on state, using the componentDidUpdate() lifecycle method. Basically we compare the value of a state property before the update and after the update, and control the animation accordingly. componentDidUpdate(prevProps, prevState) { if (prevState.play !== this.state.play) { this.myTween.play(); } } Control Through State Demo In this example we compare the value of different state properties (one for each control method implemented in the component) to control the animation as those values are updated. It's important to notice that this example is a bit convoluted for doing something that can be achieved by calling a method directly in an event handler (such as onClick). The main idea is to show the proper way of controlling things through the state. A cleaner and simpler way to control an animation is by passing a prop from a parent component or through an app state store such as Redux or MobX. This modal samples does exactly that: // parent component <ModalComponent visible={this.state.modalVisible} close={this.setModalVisible.bind(null, false)} /> // ModalComponent constructor(props){ super(props); this.modalTween = new TimelineLite({ paused: true }); } componentDidMount() { this.modalTween .to(this.modalWrap, 0.01, { autoAlpha: 1 }) .to(this.modalDialog, 0.25, { y: 50, autoAlpha: 1 }, 0) .reversed(true) .paused(false); } componentDidUpdate(){ this.modalTween.reversed(!this.props.visible); } As you can see the modal animation is controlled by updating the visible prop passed by its parent, as well as a close method passed as a prop. This code is far simpler and reduces the chance of error. State Modal Demo Using React Transition Group React Transition Group(RTG) is a great tool that allows another level of control when animating an element in a React app. This is referred to as the capacity to mount and unmount either the element being animated or an entire component. This might not seem like much when animating a single image or a div, but this could mean a significant performance enhancement in our app in some cases. SIMPLE TRANSITION DEMO In this example the <Transition> component wraps the element we want to animate. This element remains unmounted while it's show prop is false. When the value changes to true, it is mounted and then the animation starts. Then when the prop is set to false again, another animation starts and when this is completed it can also use the <Transition> component to wrap the entire component. RTG also provides the <TransitionGroup> component, which allows us to control a group of <Transition> components, in the same way a single <Transition> component allows to control the mounting and unmounting of a component. This is a good alternative for animating dynamic lists that could have elements added and/or removed, or lists based on data filtering. Transition Group Demo <Transition timeout={1000} mountOnEnter unmountOnExit in={show} addEndListener={(node, done) => { TweenLite.to(node, 0.35, { y: 0, autoAlpha: show ? 1 : 0, onComplete: done, delay: !show ? 0 : card.init ? props.index * 0.15 : 0 }); }} > In this example we use the addEndListener() callback from the <Transition> component. This gives us two parameters, the node element being added in the DOM tree and the done callback, which allows to control the inner state of the <Transition> component as the element is mounted and unmounted. The entire animation is controlled by the in prop, which triggers the addEndListener() and ultimately the animation. You may notice that we're not creating two different animations for the enter/exit state of the component. We create a single animation that uses the same DOM node and the same properties. By doing this, GSAP's overwrite manager kills any existing animation affecting the same element and properties, giving us a seamless transition between the enter and exit animations. Finally, using RTG allows us for a more fine-grained code, because we can use all the event callbacks provided by GSAP (onStart, onUpdate, onComplete, onReverse, onReverseComplete) to run all the code we want, before calling the done callback (is extremely important to notify that the animation has completed). Animating Route Changes Routing is one of the most common scenarios in a React app. Route changes in a React app means that an entirely different view is rendered depending on the path in the browser's address bar which is the most common pattern to render a completely different component in a route change. Obviously animating those changes gives a very professional look and feel to our React apps. Rendering a new component based on a route change means that the component of the previous route is unmounted and the one for the next route is mounted. We already covered animating components animations tied to mount/unmount using the <Transition> component from RTG, so this is a very good option to animate route changes. <BrowserRouter> <div> <Route path="/" exact> { ({ match }) => <Home show={match !== null} /> } </Route> <Route path="/services"> { ({ match }) => <Services show={match !== null} /> } </Route> <Route path="/contact"> { ({ match }) => <Contact show={match !== null} /> } </Route> </div> </BrowserRouter> This main component uses React Router's <BrowserRouter> and <Route> and checks the match object passed as a prop to every <Route> component, while returning the component that should be rendered for each URL. Also we pass the show property to each component, in the same way we did in the transition example. <Transition unmountOnExit in={props.show} timeout={1000} onEnter={node => TweenLite.set(node, startState)} addEndListener={ (node, done) => { TweenLite.to(node, 0.5, { autoAlpha: props.show ? 1 : 0, y: props.show ? 0 : 50, onComplete: done }); }} > As you can see, the code is basically the same used to animate a single component; the only difference is that now we have two animations happening in different components at the same time. Route Animation Demo It's worth noting that the animations used in this example are quite simple but you can use any type of animation even complex, nested animations. As you can see by now, using GSAP and React can play together nicely. With all the tools and plugins GSAP has to offer the sky is the limit for creating compelling and amazing React applications! FAQ What is this "Virtual DOM" thing, that is referred so much when it comes to React Apps?. Can GSAP work with this virtual dom? The Virtual DOM is what React uses to update the DOM in a fast and efficient way. In order to learn more about it check this article and the React Docs. GSAP can't work with the virtual DOM because the elements in the Virtual DOM are not exactly DOM nodes per-se. I often read about the declarative nature of React. Does that affect how we use GSAP in a React APP? Yes. React works by updating the rendered DOM through changes in the App state, so when creating an animation using GSAP, instead of reaching out directly to the DOM, like in most other cases, we need to wait for those changes in the app state and the DOM to be rendered, in order to use the current representation of the app state and create the animation. To learn more about how declarative and imperative code work read this article. In the second sample I see this code in the ref callback ref={div => this.cards = div}. Why is the index being used instead of just pushing the element in the array? The reason for that is that every time a React component is re-rendered, the render method is executed, but the original instance remains unchanged. The array used to create the animation is created in the component's constructor. The GSAP animation (a TimelineLite) is created in the componentDidMount hook. These two elements are created just once in the App's lifecycle, while the render method is executed on every re-render. Therefore if we push the elements to the array on every re-render, even though the Timeline instance won't change, the array will get bigger and bigger every time the component is re-rendered. This could cause a memory issue, especially for large collections. In the guide one of the samples triggers animations via the state of a component or the app. Is it possible to update the state of the component/app using GSAP? Absolutely! All you have to do is use one of the many callback events GSAP has to offer. The only precaution is to be aware of infinite loops. That is if an animation is started on the render method of a component and a callback from that animation updates the state of the component then that will trigger a re-render, which will start the animation again. You can check this simple example of how that can be done. Is it possible to trigger a route change using GSAP? It is possible using React Router's API. Although is not recommended because using React Router's API directly will prevent triggering the route change animations when using the browser's back and forward buttons. However, using React Transition Group with GSAP does trigger the route change animations with the native navigation methods. Can I use other GSAP plugins and tools in a React App? This guide shows only TweenMax, Timeline and the CSS Plugin? Yes, any GSAP tool or plugin you want can be used in a React app. Just be sure to follow the same patterns and guidelines from this article and you'll be fine. I tried the code in the guide and samples, but it doesn't work. What can i do? Head to the GreenSock forums where all your questions will be answered as fast as possible. I want to contribute or post an issue to this guide. Where can I do that? Even though this guide was reviewed by GreenSock and React experts, perhaps something might have slipped away, or with time and new versions, some things should or could be done differently. For those cases please head to this GitHub Repo and inform any issues or create a Pull Request with the changes you think should be added. New to GSAP? Check out the Getting Started Guide. Got questions? Head over to the GreenSock forums where there's a fantastic community of animators. Acknowledgments I'd like to thank the three developers that took time from their work and lives to review this guide as well as the samples in it. I couldn't have done this without their help and valuable input. Please be sure to follow them: Xiaoyan Wang: A very talented React developer. While Xiaoyan doesn't have a very active social life (twitter, facebook, etc), you can follow what he does in GitHub. Jason Quense: One of the maintainers of React Transition Group and part of the React Bootstrap Team. Jason also collaborates in many other React-related projects. Check Jason's GitHub profile for more info. Matija Marohnić: The most active contributor and maintainer of React Transition Group and Part of the Yeoman Team. Matija also contributes in a lot of React-related projects as well as many other open source software. Be sure to follow Matija in GitHub and Twitter.
  20. GreenSock

    GSAP 2.0 Released

    We've been getting requests for better support of modern build tools. With version 2.0 we're pleased to announce a switch to ES modules via NPM which should make your building, bundling, and tree shaking even smoother. Don't worry, the UMD/CommonJS flavor is still available and the CDN serves the same browser-friendly files as always. If terms like "UMD", "ES Modules", and "tree shaking" leave you scratching your head, fear not - GSAP 2.0 will work like a champ for you (as usual). There are no syntax, API, or browser-support changes. None. The major version bump was primarily due to the switch to ES modules for NPM users, that's all. DOWNLOAD GSAP NOW NPM, ES Modules, Webpack, oh my! Modern bundlers like Webpack and Rollup just love to snack on ES modules these days, usually grabbing them from NPM. So GSAP 2.0 is extra delicious covered in its chocolatey ES module outer shell. (If you're not using a bundler or NPM, skip this section entirely) npm install gsap Then you can import individual classes like: import TweenMax from "gsap/TweenMax"; import Draggable from "gsap/Draggable"; TweenMax includes (and exports) many of the commonly-used classes so you can also do this: import { TweenMax, TimelineLite, Power2, Elastic, CSSPlugin } from "gsap/TweenMax"; (TweenMax includes TweenLite, TimelineLite, TimelineMax, CSSPlugin, RoundPropsPlugin, BezierPlugin, DirectionalRotationPlugin, AttrPlugin, and all eases except CustomEase, CustomWiggle, and CustomBounce) As a convenience, there's also an "all" file that imports/exports every GSAP tool (except members-only bonus plugins), so you can do this: import { TimelineMax, CSSPlugin, ScrollToPlugin, Draggable } from "gsap/all"; IMPORTANT: if your animations aren't working as expected, it's likely an issue with tree shaking which can be easily resolved by referencing any plugins you're using. Read more. UMD/CommonJS If your environment doesn't accommodate ES modules yet, don't worry - we've got you covered. There's a "umd" directory that contains...you guessed it...regular old ES5 UMD (Universal Module Definition) versions of the files which are compatible with pretty much everything (RequireJS, Browserify, etc.). So you could import them like: //get the UMD versions. Notice the "/umd/" in the path... import { TweenMax, Power2, TimelineLite } from "gsap/umd/TweenMax"; import ScrollToPlugin from "gsap/umd/ScrollToPlugin"; import Draggable from "gsap/umd/Draggable"; What about bonus plugins like MorphSVGPlugin? Obviously we can't distribute the members-only bonus plugins via NPM, so all you need to do is log into your GreenSock account and download the latest zip which has a "bonus-files-for-npm-users" folder with the bonus plugins. Then just plop that into your project, like maybe in your /src/ folder (or wherever) and import them directly. For example, to save some typing you could rename the "bonus-files-for-npm-users" to simply "gsap-bonus" and put that in the root of your project and then: import MorphSVGPlugin from "./gsap-bonus/MorphSVGPlugin"; import SplitText from "./gsap-bonus/SplitText"; You could certainly put the bonus files in /node_modules/gsap/ if you prefer, but most people don't like doing that because it makes things less portable/updatable. There's a brand new page in the docs dedicated to NPM usage. NEW: Custom rounding increments in RoundPropsPlugin Have you ever needed to round animated values to the nearest 10 or hundredth? With the new object syntax in RoundPropsPlugin, you can round properties to various custom increments, not just integers! Simply pass in [property]:[increment] pairs like so: TweenLite.to(element, 5, { x:600, y:100 roundProps:{ x:10, //round x to nearest increment of 10 y:0.1 //round y to nearest increment of 0.1 } }); Watch the video Demo See the Pen RoundPropsPlugin Update by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. NEW: SplitText "specialChars" SplitText recognizes a new specialChars property that allows you to specify an array of special characters to protect. This is typically used for multi-character symbols like in some languages where there are pairs (or sometimes even 4 characters) combined to form a single character. See the Pen SplitText with specialChars feature by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. No need to do this for most emoji's, though, because those are already supported natively in SplitText! Got questions? If you haven't checked out the forums, you're missing out! It's a great place to get your questions answered and participate in the community. We carefully monitor and answer questions there. Or feel free to contact us directly if you prefer. Changelog View the full changelog here (note: version 2.0.0 is just 1.20.5 with a version bump to avoid breaking changes for NPM users) Happy tweening! DOWNLOAD GSAP NOW
  21. Before jumping into Club GreenSock for the super-cool bonus plugins, perhaps you're plagued by questions like: Will the bonus plugins work well for my project? How difficult is the API to work with? Will they play nicely with my other tools? Will they work in Edge? Firefox? ... That's why we created special versions of the plugins that can be used on CodePen anytime...for FREE! The video below shows how to get up and running fast. Video Demo with quick-copy URLs See the Pen Try Club GreenSock Bonus Plugins FREE on Codepen by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Template (fork this): See the Pen GreenSock Bonus Starter Template by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Of course we offer a money-back satisfaction guarantee with Club GreenSock anyway, but hopefully this helps give you even more confidence to sign up. CodePen is an online, browser-based editor that makes it easy to write and share front-end code. If you need help using CodePen check out their interactive editor tour.
  22. When you animate the value of a CSS variable you can affect any element that uses that variable in any of its styles. Instead of having a DOM element as the target of your tween, you will use the rule that defines your CSS variable. Check out the video and demo below to see exactly how it works. Video Code CSS html { --myColor: green; } .wrapper { border: 1px solid var(--myColor); border-radius: 10px; margin-right:10px; } h2, strong { color:var(--myColor); } .cool { display:inline-block; padding:10px; color:white; border-radius:8px; background-color:var(--myColor); } JavaScript TweenMax.to("html", 1, {"--myColor":"orange", yoyo:true, repeat:20}); Demo See the Pen CSS Variables Demo by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Support for CSS variables was added in GSAP 1.20.0
  23. GreenSock

    HomePod

  24. GreenSock

    GSAP 1.20.0 Released

    Here are some of the highlights of the GSAP 1.20.0 release... yoyoEase Now you can specify an ease for the yoyo (backwards) portion of a repeating TweenMax animation. Set it to a specific ease like yoyoEase:Power2.easeOut or to flip the existing ease, use the shortcut yoyoEase:true. TweenMax is smart enough to automatically set yoyo:true if you define a yoyoEase, so there's less code for you to write. Score! Animate CSS Variables (custom properties) See the Pen CSS Variables Demo by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Emoji support in TextPlugin 'Nuf said. ...and more There are quite a few little improvements and bug fixes as well, which are listed in the changelog at the github repository. Download GSAP today. Happy tweening!
  25. GreenSock

    Introducing CustomEase

    Are your animations meant to feel playful? Robotic? Slick? Realistic? If they had a voice, what would they sound like? To become an animation rock star, you must develop a keen sense of easing because that's what determines the style of movement between point A and point B. GreenSock's new CustomEase frees you from the limitations of canned easing options. Create literally any ease imaginable. Zero limitations. CSS animations and WAAPI offer cubic-bezier() which is great but with only two control points it's impossible to create more complex effects like bouncing, elastic, wiggles, rough/jerky eases, etc. Plus you can't make an ease return to its starting values (like a ball jumping into the air and falling back to the ground with a bounce). Features Unlimited anchors and control points. Copy/Paste any SVG <path> (including direct copy/paste from Adobe Illustrator). Use CSS cubic-bezier() values (For example, from cubic-bezier.com). Editor has snapping, undo, sample code and other conveniences. Start with any standard ease and customize it. getSVGData() method turns any ease into SVG <path> data for display at the size you define. Extremely optimized for runtime performance. Free for anyone with a GreenSock account. Reading Ease Curves, Editing, and Using CustomEase Here's an in-depth video tour that'll get you up to speed with exactly how to use CustomEase: Ready to play? Check out the new Ease Visualizer with CustomEase support. Click "Custom" to edit the curve as much as you want: Simple Example See the Pen Video: Single Tween with CustomEase by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen.&#13;We strongly recommend creating your CustomEases initially (rather than in each tween) to maximize performance and readability. You then reference them by ID in your tweening code. When an ease is created, it must parse through the points and do various calculations to prepare for blisteringly fast runtime performance during the animation, so executing those calculations when your page/app loads is typically best. Download CustomEase To get CustomEase, you must have a GreenSock account which is completely free to set up. Plus it gets you access to our community forums (a fantastic place to learn and get your questions answered). The widget below lets you sign up or if you're already logged in, it'll give you immediate access to the download zip that contains CustomEase in the "easing" directory. Note: CustomEase is not in the github repository or CDN; it's only available for download at GreenSock.com. [loginwidget]
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