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Found 4 results

  1. GreenSock

    CustomEase

    Are your animations meant to feel playful? Robotic? Slick? Realistic? If they had a voice, what would they sound like? To become an animation rock star, you must develop a keen sense of easing because that's what determines the style of movement between point A and point B. GreenSock's new CustomEase frees you from the limitations of canned easing options. Create literally any ease imaginable. Zero limitations. CSS animations and WAAPI offer cubic-bezier() which is great but with only two control points it's impossible to create more complex effects like bouncing, elastic, wiggles, rough/jerky eases, etc. Plus you can't make an ease return to its starting values (like a ball jumping into the air and falling back to the ground with a bounce). Features Unlimited anchors and control points. Copy/Paste any SVG <path> (including directly from Adobe Illustrator). Use CSS cubic-bezier() values (For example, from cubic-bezier.com). Editor has snapping, undo, sample code and other conveniences. Start with any standard ease and customize it. getSVGData() method turns any ease into SVG <path> data for display at the size you define. Extremely optimized for runtime performance. Free for anyone with a GreenSock account. Reading Ease Curves, Editing, and Using CustomEase Here's an in-depth video tour that'll get you up to speed with exactly how to use CustomEase: Ready to play? Check out the new Ease Visualizer with CustomEase support. Edit the curve as much as you want: Download CustomEase Get CustomEase by creating a FREE GreenSock account which gets you access to our community forums plus you’ll receive our exclusive “GreenSock Insider” email series (you can unsubscribe anytime). Sign up and then go to your account dashboard to download it. Note: CustomEase is not in the github repository or CDN; it's only available for download at GreenSock.com.
  2. GreenSock

    TimelineLite

    TimelineLite is a lightweight, intuitive timeline class for building and managing sequences of TweenLite, TweenMax, TimelineLite, and/or TimelineMax instances. You can think of a TimelineLite instance like a container where you place tweens (or other timelines) over the course of time. build sequences easily by adding tweens with methods like to(), from(), staggerFrom(), add(), and more. tweens can overlap as much as you want and you have complete control over where they get placed on the timeline. add labels, play(), stop(), seek(), restart(), and even reverse() smoothly anytime. nest timelines within timelines as deeply as you want. set the progress of the timeline using its progress() method. For example, to skip to the halfway point, set myTimeline.progress(0.5); tween the time() or progress() values to fastforward/rewind the timeline. You could even attach a slider to one of these properties to give the user the ability to drag forwards/backwards through the timeline. speed up or slow down the entire timeline using timeScale(). You can even tween this property to gradually speed up or slow down. add onComplete, onStart, onUpdate, and/or onReverseComplete callbacks using the constructor’s vars object. use the powerful add() method to add labels, callbacks, tweens and timelines to a timeline. base the timing on frames instead of seconds if you prefer. Please note, however, that the timeline’s timing mode dictates its childrens’ timing mode as well. kill the tweens of a particular object with killTweensOf() or get the tweens of an object with getTweensOf() or get all the tweens/timelines in the timeline with getChildren() If you need even more features like, repeat(), repeatDelay(), yoyo(), currentLabel(), getLabelsArray(), getLabelAfter(), getLabelBefore(), getActive(), tweenTo() and more, check out TimelineMax which extends TimelineLite. Sample Code //instantiate a TimelineLite var tl = new TimelineLite(); //add a from() tween at the beginning of the timline tl.from(head, 0.5, {left:100, opacity:0}); //add another tween immediately after tl.from(subhead, 0.5, {left:-100, opacity:0}); //use position parameter "+=0.5" to schedule next tween 0.5 seconds after previous tweens end tl.from(feature, 0.5, {scale:.5, autoAlpha:0}, "+=0.5"); //use position parameter "-=0.5" to schedule next tween 0.25 seconds before previous tweens end. //great for overlapping tl.from(description, 0.5, {left:100, autoAlpha:0}, "-=0.25"); //add a label 0.5 seconds later to mark the placement of the next tween tl.add("stagger", "+=0.5") //to jump to this label use: tl.play("stagger"); //stagger the animation of all icons with 0.1s between each tween's start time //this tween is added tl.staggerFrom(icons, 0.2, {scale:0, autoAlpha:0}, 0.1, "stagger"); Demo See the Pen TimelineLite Control : new GS.com by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Watch The video below will walk you through the types of problems TimelineLite solves and illustrate the flexibility and power of our core sequencing tool. Learn more in the TimelineLite docs. For even more sequencing power and control take a look at TimelineMax.
  3. SplitText is an easy to use JavaScript utility that allows you to split HTML text into characters, words and lines. Its easy to use, extremely flexible and works all the way back to IE8. Although SplitText is naturally a good fit for creating HTML5 text animation effects with GreenSock's animation tools, it has no dependencies on GSAP, jQuery or any other libraries. .videoNav { color:#555; margin-top: 12px; } 0:00 Intro 0:21 SplitText solves problems 2:01 Basic Split 3:34 Configuration options 6:35 Animation View the JS panel in the Codepen demo above to see how easy it is to: Split text into words and characters. Pass the chars array into a TweenMax staggerFrom() tween for animation. Revert the text back to its pre-split state when you are done animating. Additional features and notes You can specify a new class to be added to each split element and also add an auto-incrementing class like .word1, .word2, .word3 etc. View demo You don't have to manually insert <br>tags, SplitText honors natural line breaks. SplitText doesn't force non-breaking spaces into the divs like many other solutions on the web do. SplitText is not designed to work with SVG <text> nodes. Learn more in our detailed SplitText API documentation. Please visit our SplitText Codepen Collection for more demos of SplitText in action. Where can I get it? SplitText is a membership benefit of Club GreenSock ("Shockingly Green" and "Business Green" levels). Joining Club GreenSock gets you a bunch of other bonus plugins and tools like ThrowPropsPlugin as well, so check out greensock.com/club/ to get details and sign up today. The support of club members has been critical to the success of GreenSock - it's what makes building these tools possible.
  4. GreenSock

    Draggable

    #container { margin:0; padding:0; font-family: Signika Negative, Asap, sans-serif; font-weight: 300; font-size: 17px; line-height: 150%; } #container h1 { font-family: Signika Negative, Asap, sans-serif; font-weight: 300; font-size: 48px; margin: 10px 0 0 0; padding: 0; line-height: 115%; text-shadow: 1px 1px 0 white; } #container h2 { font-family: Signika Negative, Asap, sans-serif; font-weight: normal; font-size:30px; color: #111; margin: 18px 0 0 0; padding: 0; line-height:115%; } #container p { line-height: 150%; color:#555; margin: 0 0 10px 0; } #container a { color:#71b200; } #container .normalBullets code { font-size: inherit; color: inherit; font-weight: normal; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; } #container .normalBullets li strong { font-size: 110%; } #container .normalBullets li { margin-bottom:8px; } #container .blackBG h1, #container .darkBG h1 { color: #ddd; text-shadow: none; } #container .blackBG p { color: #999; } #container .section { width: 100%; text-align: center; position: relative; padding: 20px; } /* .block was causing conflict with wp theme --- renamed below */ #container .customblock { padding: 10px; text-align: left; position: relative; } #container .blackBG { background-color: black; } #container .lightBG { background-color: #e4e4e4; } #container .subtleDark { color: #999; text-shadow: none; } #container .blackBG p strong { color:#ddd; font-weight: normal; } /** CODE **/ #container .code { width: 100%; border: 1px solid #555; padding: 0; margin: 20px 0; } #container .code pre.prettyprint { margin:0; overflow: auto; } #container .codeTitle { color: #aaa; background-color: #111; padding: 8px; font-size:18px; border-bottom: 1px solid #555; } #container code, #scroller code { color: black; font-size: 16px; } #container .blackBG code, #container .darkBG code { /* carl removed color: #ccc; */ } #container pre { font-size: 1.1em; padding:8px; background-color:#333; color:white; border: 1px solid #777; } /** TOSS **/ #container .box { background-color: #91e600; text-align: center; font-family: Asap, Avenir, Arial, sans-serif; width: 196px; height: 100px; line-height: 100px; overflow: hidden; color: black; position: absolute; top:0; -webkit-border-radius: 10px; -moz-border-radius: 10px; border-radius: 10px; } /** SCROLL **/ #scrollContainer { position:relative; height: 370px; } #scroller { top:20px; left:10%; position:absolute; width:80%; height:280px; overflow:scroll; background-color:#ddd; padding:25px; color:#333; border:4px solid #999; } #scroller * { box-sizing: content-box; } #scroller p { color: #444; } #scroller p strong { color:#111; } #container .controls { background-color: #222; border: 1px solid #555; color: #bbb; font-size: 18px; } #container .controls ul { list-style: none; padding: 0; margin: 0; } #container .controls li { display: inline-block; padding: 8px 0 8px 10px; margin:0; } /** BUTTONS **/ #container .button { display:inline-block; border-radius:8px; border-bottom-width: 2px; box-shadow: inset 0px 1px 0px rgba(255,255,255,0.6), 0px 3px 6px 0px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.6); cursor:pointer; text-align: center; font-family: Signika Negative, Asap, Avenir, Arial, sans-serif; position:relative; margin: 4px; color:black; } #container .largeButton { padding: 12px 24px; font-size: 20px; margin: 12px 8px; min-width:110px; } .greenGradient { border: 1px solid #6d9a22; background-color: #699a18; background: linear-gradient(to bottom, #8cce1e 0%,#699a18 52%,#639314 53%,#76b016 100%); /* W3C */ text-shadow: 1px 1px 2px #384d16; color:#fff; text-decoration: none; } /** EXPANDABLE POINTS (FAQ) **/ .expPoint, .expList li { list-style: none; line-height: normal; margin: 0 0 0 8px; padding: 6px 4px 4px 24px; position:relative; border: 1px solid rgba(204,204,204,0); font-size: 110%; color: #111; font-weight: normal; } .expPoint, .expContent { font-family: Signika Negative, Asap, sans-serif; font-weight: 300; line-height: 140%; } .expPoint:hover, .expList li:hover { background-color:white; border: 1px solid rgb(216,216,216); } .expContent { height: 0; overflow: hidden; color: #444; margin: 2px 0 0 0; padding-top: 0; font-size:16px; } .expMore { color: #71b200; text-decoration: underline; font-size:0.8em; } .arrow-right { width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 5px solid transparent; border-bottom: 5px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #999; display:inline-block; margin: -4px 8px 0 -14px; vertical-align: middle; opacity:0.8; } .tableCellDesktop { display: table-cell; } .tableCellDesktop img { left: 120px; } @media screen and (max-width: 860px) { .tableCellDesktop { display: block; } .tableCellDesktop img { left: 0px; } } When you pair GreenSock's Draggable with ThrowPropsPlugin, you get the ultimate tag-team for making a DOM element draggable, spinnable, tossable, and even flick-scrollable! You can impose bounds, complex snapping rules, and have things glide to a stop in a silky-smooth way, all with as little as one line of code! No kidding. Works great on touch devices too. Below you'll find 3 examples of what Draggable can do when it's got some ThrowPropsPlugin love under the hood. Check out the code samples too (they auto-update as you change options). Throw By default, Draggable uses type:"x,y" meaning it'll use css transforms for positional movement (hardware accelerated when possible). Activate the some of the snapping options below and watch how nicely things glide into place exactly on the grid or snap into place as you drag. Notice the edge resistance as you try to drag past the edges; everything is configurable. [ View this on codepen.io ] Drag and throw me Drag and throw me too Options Snap end position to grid Live snap Lock axis Code Draggable.create(".box", { type: "x,y", edgeResistance: 0.65, bounds: "#container", throwProps: true }); Spin Set Draggable's type to "rotation" and watch what happens (grab the knob below and spin it). ThrowPropsPlugin tracks the velocity of the rotation and continues when you release your mouse (or finger for touch devices), gliding to a stop naturally. Activate the "Snap to 90-degree increments" option to see how easy it is to make it always land at certain rotational values without any jerking or awkwardness. Snap to 90-degree increments Code Draggable.create("#knob", {type: "rotation", throwProps: true}); Scroll (Drag & Flick) Draggable can even be used to control the scrollTop and/or scrollLeft properties of an element, complete with overscrolling, snap-back, momentum continuation, and edge resistance. It's as simple as changing the type to "scroll". And Draggable doesn't use artificial scrollbars like some other tools - it uses native scrolling with the standard OS/browser scrollbar UI. Play with the demo below and see for yourself. Drag me to scroll me Click and drag this content and then let go as you're dragging to throw it. Notice how it smoothly glides to a rest, respecting the initial velocity and even permitting overscolling with bounce-back without forcing fake/simulated scrollbars. It's actually using the scrollTop or scrollLeft of the container, and then if/when it exceeds the bounds, it'll apply a translate3d() transform for hardware-accelerated performance, and it'll even fall back to using padding when 3D transforms aren't available. Yes, it even works in IE8! How does it work? When you create the Draggable with type:"scroll" (or "scrollTop" or "scrollLeft"), it will create a div and wrap it around the native content of the target element so that it can move things appropriately. So that wrapper div ends up being the only child of the element. Then, as you drag, it updates the scrollTop/scrollLeft of the element until you exceed the bounds at which time it'll either add a translate3d() CSS transform (if supported) to that wrapper div or fall back to using padding for older browsers. This gives you the best of both worlds - it delivers native scrolling with normal scrollbar UI that's built into the OS/browser, plus outstanding performance on mobile devices due to the translate3d() sweetness on overscroll, and compatibility even with IE8, all in a 3.4k gzipped footprint (not including TweenLite or CSSPlugin which are required). Oh, and don't forget the kinetic-based flick scrolling that's enabled when you load ThrowPropsPlugin and set throwProps:true in the config object. When you drag past the normal scrolling limits, the edgeResistance kicks in (you control how much). It just "feels" natural and fluid, much more so than most other options out there. Did we mention Draggable works great with touch events too? And if the user flick-scrolls and then while it's animating, they use their mouse wheel or grab the scrollbar to take control themselves, Draggable automatically releases control and stops the animation. Don't worry your pretty little head. Usage Setup is a breeze. One line is all you need: Draggable.create("#container", {type:"scroll", throwProps:true, edgeResistance:0.35}); That's it! Of course you can tweak the configuration however you please. Want to only scroll vertically? Use type:"scrollTop". Or for horizontal scrolling, use type:"scrollLeft". When you use simply type:"scroll", it allows scrolling in either direction. Change the edgeResistance to 1 if you don't want the user to be able to drag past the edge. Note that ThrowPropsPlugin is a membership benefit of Club GreenSock ("Shockingly Green" and "Business Green" levels), but the Draggable works fine without that - you just won't get the kinetic-based motion. You can still drag things. Not just for scrolling As you can see from the examples above, Draggable is multi-talented. Change the type to "x,y" to make the entire object draggable around the screen (literally moving it, not scrolling). Or type:"top,left" does the same thing, but uses the "top" and "left" css properties instead of translateX() and translateY() CSS transforms. Or if you want to be able to drag-spin an object, use type:"rotation". In fact, it'll even honor the transform-origin of the element. Options type: scroll scrollTop scrollLeft top,left top left x,y x y rotation edgeResistance: 0 0.1 0.25 0.5 0.75 1 throwProps (kinetic motion) lock axis Code Draggable.create("#scroller", {type:"scroll", edgeResistance:0.5, throwProps:true}); Features Touch enabled - works great on tablets, phones, and desktop browsers. Incredibly smooth - GPU-accelerated and requestAnimationFrame-driven for ultimate performance. Compared to other options out there, Draggable just feels far more natural and fluid, particularly when imposing bounds and momentum. Momentum-based animation - if you have ThrowPropsPlugin loaded, you can simply set throwProps:true in the config object and it'll automatically apply natural, momentum-based movement after the mouse/touch is released, causing the object to glide gracefully to a stop. You can even control the amount of resistance, maximum or minimum duration, etc. Complex snapping made easy - snap to points within a certain radius (see example), or feed in an array of values and it'll select the closest one, or implement your own custom logic in a function. Ultimate flexibility. You can have things live-snap (while dragging) or only on release (even with momentum applied, thanks to ThrowPropsPlugin)! Impose bounds - tell a draggable element to stay within the bounds of another DOM element (a container) as in bounds:"#container" or define bounds as coordinates like bounds:{top:100, left:0, width:1000, height:800} or specific maximum/minimum values like bounds:{minRotation:0, maxRotation:270}. Sense overlaps with hitTest() - see if one element is overlapping another and even set a tolerance threshold (like at least 20 pixels or 25% of either element's total surface area) using the super-flexible Draggable.hitTest() method. Feed it a mouse event and it'll tell you if the mouse is over the element. See http://codepen.io/GreenSock/pen/GFBvn for a simple example. Define a trigger element - maybe you want only a certain area to trigger the dragging (like the top bar of a window) - it's as simple as trigger:"#topBar", for example. Drag position, rotation, or scroll - lots of drag types to choose from: "x,y" | "top,left" | "rotation" | "scroll" | "x" | "y" | "top" | "left" | "scrollTop" | "scrollLeft" Lock movement along a certain axis - set lockAxis:true and Draggable will watch the direction the user starts to drag and then restrict it to that axis. Or if you only want to allow vertical or horizontal movement, that's easy too using the type ("top", "y" or "scrollTop" only allow vertical movement; "x", "left", or "scrollLeft" only allow horizontal movement). Rotation honors transform origin - by default, spinnable elements will rotate around their center, but you can set transformOrigin to something else to make the pivot point be elsewhere. For example, if you call TweenLite.set(yourElement, {transformOrigin:"top left"}) before dragging, it will rotate around its top left corner. Or use % or px. Whatever is set in the element's css will be honored. Rich callback system and event dispatching - you can use any of the following callbacks: onPress, onDragStart, onDrag, onDragEnd, onRelease,, onLockAxis, and onClick. Inside the callbacks, "this" refers to the Draggable instance itself, so you can easily access its "target" or bounds, etc. If you prefer event listeners instead, Draggable dispatches events too so you can do things likeyourDraggable.addEventListener("dragend", yourFunc); Works great with SVG Even works in transformed containers! Got a Draggable inside a rotated/scaled container? No problem. No other tool handles this properly that we've seen. Auto-scrolling, even in multiple containers - set autoScroll:1 for normal-speed auto scrolling, or autoScroll:2 would scroll twice as fast, etc. The closer you move toward the edge, the faster scrolling gets. See a demo here (added in version 0.12.0) Sense clicks when the element moves less than 3 pixels - a common challenge is figuring out when a user is trying to click/tap an object rather than drag it, so if the mouse/touch moves less than 3 pixels from its starting position, it will be interpreted as a "click" and the onClick callback will be called (and a "click" event dispatched) without actually moving the element. You can define a different threshold using minimumMovement config property, like minimumMovement:6 for 6 pixels. All major browsers are supported including IE9+. IE8 lacks hitTest() support. See full documentation here. See our Codepen Draggable Collection here. To get ThrowPropsPlugin (for the momentum-based features), join Club GreenSock today. You'll be glad you did. If not, we'll gladly issue a full refund.
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