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Found 5 results

  1. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. A post by Carl Schooff, GreenSock's "Geek Ambassador" Hot on the heels of the CSS Myth-Busting article, I'm going to take a deeper look into CSS Animations and how they fit (or don't fit) into a modern animator's workflow. This isn't about simple fades or basic transitions (CSS is great for those); Developers who use animation to tel
  2. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Update: don't miss our guest post on css-tricks.com, Myth Busting: CSS Animations vs. JavaScript which provides some additional data, visual examples, and a speed test focused on this topic. Ever since CSS3 "transitions" and "animations" were introduced, they have been widely lauded as the future of animation on the
  3. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Update: don't miss our guest post on css-tricks.com, Myth Busting: CSS Animations vs. JavaScript which provides some additional data, visual examples, and a speed test focused on this topic. jQuery is the 700-pound gorilla that has been driving lots of animation on the web for years, but let's see how it fares when it steps into t
  4. Hi all, I recently stumbled upon MoveThis, another tweening engine. If you scroll down to the Gears demo, you'll see demos of Arch and Reverse, probably 2 tween easing equations. (I can't figure if they are just different names for existing Penner equations, although they are signed by "Todd Williams" aka taterboy) Would adding these eases into TweenLite be of any use? Unless they are already added. Also, MoveThis has a nice "easingStrength" parameter that apparently controls the amount of ease applied. Does TL have anything like that? Would it be a useful addition? Thanks
  5. Hi all, I wanted to know how the EndArrayPlugin is different from the regular TweenLite? Comparing: var myArray:Array = [1,2,3,4]; TweenLite.to(myArray, 1.5, [10,20,30,40]); And the alternate EndArray syntax: var myArray:Array = [1,2,3,4]; TweenLite.to(myArray, 1.5, {endArray:[10,20,30,40]}); How would that be different? And I looked at the code in EndArrayPlugin, it supports round on/off which TweenLite does not? Is that the only difference or is there more? They both work, I've tested them.
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