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  1. React has updated and introduced hooks since this article was written. We recommend reading our updated guide to animating with GSAP in React. This page was also created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details Preface This guide assumes a basic knowledge of both the GreenSock Animation Platform (GSAP) and React, as well as some common tools used to develop a React app. As GSAP becomes the de-facto standard for creating rich animations and UI's on the web, developers must learn how to integrate it with other tools like React which has become popular because it allows developers to write their apps in a modular, declarative and re-usable fashion. As a moderator in the GreenSock forums, I've noticed that there are a few common hurdles to getting the two working together seamlessly, like referencing the DOM element appropriately, doing things The React Way, etc. which is why I'm writing this article. We won't delve into how a React app should be structured since our focus is on using GSAP, but the techniques used throughout this guide follow the official guidelines and have been reviewed by maintainers of the React Transition Group tool. We'll start simple and get more complex toward the end. How GSAP Works GSAP basically updates numeric properties of an object many times per second which creates the illusion of animation. For DOM elements, GSAP updates the the inline style properties. const myElement = document.getElementById("my-element"); TweenLite.to(myElement, 1, {width: 100, backgroundColor: "red"}); As you can see this means that we need access to the actual DOM node rendered in the document in order to pass it to the TweenLite.to() method. How React Works Explaining how React works is beyond the scope of this article, but let's focus on how React gets the JSX code we write and puts that in the DOM. <div className="my-class"> Some content here </div> With React, we normally don't pass an id attribute to the element because we use a declarative way to access methods, instances, props and state. It's through the component's (or the application's) state that we can change how things are represented in the DOM. There's no direct DOM manipulation, so typically there's no need to actually access the DOM. The React team has given developers ways to access the DOM nodes when needed, and the API changed a bit over the years as React matured. At this time (September, 2018) the latest version of React (16.4.2) allows developers to use Refs to access the DOM nodes. In this guide we'll mainly use the Callback Refs to create a reference to the DOM node and then feed it into GSAP animations because it's much faster for GSAP to directly manipulate properties rather than funneling them through React's state machine. Creating Our First Animation We'll use the ref to access the DOM node and the componentDidMount() lifecycle method of the component to create our first animation, because this will guarantee that the node has been added to the DOM tree and is ready to be passed into a GSAP animation. class MyComponent extends Component { constructor(props){ super(props); // reference to the DOM node this.myElement = null; // reference to the animation this.myTween = null; } componentDidMount(){ // use the node ref to create the animation this.myTween = TweenLite.to(this.myElement, 1, {x: 100, y: 100}); } render(){ return <div ref={div => this.myElement = div} />; } } Not that difficult, right? Let's go through the code so we can understand what is happening. First when we create an instance of this class, two properties are added to it: myElement and myTween, but both are equal to null. Why? Because at this point the node has not been added to the DOM tree and if we try to pass this node to a GSAP animation, we'll get an error indicating that GSAP cannot tween a null target. After the new instance has been initialized, the render() method runs. In the render method we're using the ref attribute that is basically a function that has a single parameter – the DOM node being added to the DOM tree. At this point we update the reference to the DOM node created in the class constructor. After that, this reference is no longer null and can be used anywhere we need it in our component. Finally, the componentDidMount() method runs and updates the reference to myTween with a TweenLite tween whose target is the internal reference to the DOM node that should animate. Simple, elegant and very React-way of us! It is worth mentioning that we could have created a one-run-animation by not creating a reference to the TweenLite tween in the constructor method. We could have just created a tween in the componentDidMount method and it would run immediately, like this: componentDidMount(){ TweenLite.to(this.myElement, 1, {x: 100, y: 100}); } The main benefit of storing a TweenLite tween as a reference in the component, is that this pattern allows us to use any of the methods GSAP has to offer like: play(), pause(), reverse(), restart(), seek(), change the speed (timeScale), etc., to get full control of the animations. Also this approach allows us to create any GSAP animation (TweenLite, TweenMax, TimelineLite, etc.) in the constructor. For example, we could use a timeline in order to create a complex animation: constructor(props){ super(props); this.myElement = null; this.myTween = TimelineLite({paused: true}); } componentDidMount(){ this.myTween .to(this.myElement, 0.5, {x: 100}) .to(this.myElement, 0.5, {y: 100, rotation: 180}) .play(); } With this approach we create a paused Timeline in the constructor and add the individual tweens using the shorthand methods. Since the Timeline was paused initially, we play it after adding all the tweens to it. We could also leave it paused and control it somewhere else in our app. The following example shows this technique: Simple Tween Demo Animating a Group of Elements One of the perks of using React is that allows us to add a group of elements using the array.map() method, which reduces the amount of HTML we have to write. This also can help us when creating an animation for all those elements. Let's say that you want to animate a group of elements onto the screen in a staggered fashion. It's simple: constructor(props){ super(props); this.myTween = new TimelineLite({paused: true}); this.myElements = []; } componentDidMount(){ this.myTween.staggerTo(this.myElements, 0.5, {y: 0, autoAlpha: 1}, 0.1); } render(){ return <div> <ul> {elementsArray.map((element, index) => <li key={element.id} ref={li => this.myElements[index] = li} > {element.name} </li>)} </ul> </div>; } This looks a bit more complex but we're using the same pattern to access each DOM node. The only difference is that instead of using a single reference for each element, we add each element to an array. In the componentDidMount() method we use TimelineLite.staggerTo() and GSAP does its magic to create a staggered animation! Multiple Elements Demo Creating a Complex Sequence We won't always get all the elements in an array so sometimes we might need to create a complex animation using different elements. Just like in the first example we store a reference in the constructor for each element and create our timeline in the componentDidMount() method: Timeline Sequence Demo Note how in this example we use a combination of methods. Most of the elements are stored as an instance property using this.element = null, but also we're adding a group of elements using an array.map(). Instead of using the map() callback to create tweens in the timeline (which is completely possible), we're adding them to an array that is passed in the staggerFrom() method to create the stagger effect. Animating Via State The most commonly used pattern to update a React app is through changing the state of its components. So it's easy to control when and how elements are animated based on the app state. It's not very difficult to listen to state changes and control a GSAP animation depending on state, using the componentDidUpdate() lifecycle method. Basically we compare the value of a state property before the update and after the update, and control the animation accordingly. componentDidUpdate(prevProps, prevState) { if (prevState.play !== this.state.play) { this.myTween.play(); } } Control Through State Demo In this example we compare the value of different state properties (one for each control method implemented in the component) to control the animation as those values are updated. It's important to notice that this example is a bit convoluted for doing something that can be achieved by calling a method directly in an event handler (such as onClick). The main idea is to show the proper way of controlling things through the state. A cleaner and simpler way to control an animation is by passing a prop from a parent component or through an app state store such as Redux or MobX. This modal samples does exactly that: // parent component <ModalComponent visible={this.state.modalVisible} close={this.setModalVisible.bind(null, false)} /> // ModalComponent constructor(props){ super(props); this.modalTween = new TimelineLite({ paused: true }); } componentDidMount() { this.modalTween .to(this.modalWrap, 0.01, { autoAlpha: 1 }) .to(this.modalDialog, 0.25, { y: 50, autoAlpha: 1 }, 0) .reversed(true) .paused(false); } componentDidUpdate(){ this.modalTween.reversed(!this.props.visible); } As you can see the modal animation is controlled by updating the visible prop passed by its parent, as well as a close method passed as a prop. This code is far simpler and reduces the chance of error. State Modal Demo Using React Transition Group React Transition Group(RTG) is a great tool that allows another level of control when animating an element in a React app. This is referred to as the capacity to mount and unmount either the element being animated or an entire component. This might not seem like much when animating a single image or a div, but this could mean a significant performance enhancement in our app in some cases. SIMPLE TRANSITION DEMO In this example the <Transition> component wraps the element we want to animate. This element remains unmounted while it's show prop is false. When the value changes to true, it is mounted and then the animation starts. Then when the prop is set to false again, another animation starts and when this is completed it can also use the <Transition> component to wrap the entire component. RTG also provides the <TransitionGroup> component, which allows us to control a group of <Transition> components, in the same way a single <Transition> component allows to control the mounting and unmounting of a component. This is a good alternative for animating dynamic lists that could have elements added and/or removed, or lists based on data filtering. Transition Group Demo <Transition timeout={1000} mountOnEnter unmountOnExit in={show} addEndListener={(node, done) => { TweenLite.to(node, 0.35, { y: 0, autoAlpha: show ? 1 : 0, onComplete: done, delay: !show ? 0 : card.init ? props.index * 0.15 : 0 }); }} > In this example we use the addEndListener() callback from the <Transition> component. This gives us two parameters, the node element being added in the DOM tree and the done callback, which allows to control the inner state of the <Transition> component as the element is mounted and unmounted. The entire animation is controlled by the in prop, which triggers the addEndListener() and ultimately the animation. You may notice that we're not creating two different animations for the enter/exit state of the component. We create a single animation that uses the same DOM node and the same properties. By doing this, GSAP's overwrite manager kills any existing animation affecting the same element and properties, giving us a seamless transition between the enter and exit animations. Finally, using RTG allows us for a more fine-grained code, because we can use all the event callbacks provided by GSAP (onStart, onUpdate, onComplete, onReverse, onReverseComplete) to run all the code we want, before calling the done callback (is extremely important to notify that the animation has completed). Animating Route Changes Routing is one of the most common scenarios in a React app. Route changes in a React app means that an entirely different view is rendered depending on the path in the browser's address bar which is the most common pattern to render a completely different component in a route change. Obviously animating those changes gives a very professional look and feel to our React apps. Rendering a new component based on a route change means that the component of the previous route is unmounted and the one for the next route is mounted. We already covered animating components animations tied to mount/unmount using the <Transition> component from RTG, so this is a very good option to animate route changes. <BrowserRouter> <div> <Route path="/" exact> { ({ match }) => <Home show={match !== null} /> } </Route> <Route path="/services"> { ({ match }) => <Services show={match !== null} /> } </Route> <Route path="/contact"> { ({ match }) => <Contact show={match !== null} /> } </Route> </div> </BrowserRouter> This main component uses React Router's <BrowserRouter> and <Route> and checks the match object passed as a prop to every <Route> component, while returning the component that should be rendered for each URL. Also we pass the show property to each component, in the same way we did in the transition example. <Transition unmountOnExit in={props.show} timeout={1000} onEnter={node => TweenLite.set(node, startState)} addEndListener={ (node, done) => { TweenLite.to(node, 0.5, { autoAlpha: props.show ? 1 : 0, y: props.show ? 0 : 50, onComplete: done }); }} > As you can see, the code is basically the same used to animate a single component; the only difference is that now we have two animations happening in different components at the same time. Route Animation Demo It's worth noting that the animations used in this example are quite simple but you can use any type of animation even complex, nested animations. As you can see by now, using GSAP and React can play together nicely. With all the tools and plugins GSAP has to offer the sky is the limit for creating compelling and amazing React applications! FAQ What is this "Virtual DOM" thing, that is referred so much when it comes to React Apps? Can GSAP work with this virtual dom? The Virtual DOM is what React uses to update the DOM in a fast and efficient way. In order to learn more about it check this article and the React Docs. GSAP can't work with the virtual DOM because the elements in the Virtual DOM are not exactly DOM nodes per-se. I often read about the declarative nature of React. Does that affect how we use GSAP in a React APP? Yes. React works by updating the rendered DOM through changes in the App state, so when creating an animation using GSAP, instead of reaching out directly to the DOM, like in most other cases, we need to wait for those changes in the app state and the DOM to be rendered, in order to use the current representation of the app state and create the animation. To learn more about how declarative and imperative code work read this article. In the second sample I see this code in the ref callback ref={div => this.cards = div}. Why is the index being used instead of just pushing the element in the array? The reason for that is that every time a React component is re-rendered, the render method is executed, but the original instance remains unchanged. The array used to create the animation is created in the component's constructor. The GSAP animation (a TimelineLite) is created in the componentDidMount hook. These two elements are created just once in the App's lifecycle, while the render method is executed on every re-render. Therefore if we push the elements to the array on every re-render, even though the Timeline instance won't change, the array will get bigger and bigger every time the component is re-rendered. This could cause a memory issue, especially for large collections. In the guide one of the samples triggers animations via the state of a component or the app. Is it possible to update the state of the component/app using GSAP? Absolutely! All you have to do is use one of the many callback events GSAP has to offer. The only precaution is to be aware of infinite loops. That is if an animation is started on the render method of a component and a callback from that animation updates the state of the component then that will trigger a re-render, which will start the animation again. You can check this simple example of how that can be done. Is it possible to trigger a route change using GSAP? It is possible using React Router's API. Although is not recommended because using React Router's API directly will prevent triggering the route change animations when using the browser's back and forward buttons. However, using React Transition Group with GSAP does trigger the route change animations with the native navigation methods. Can I use other GSAP plugins and tools in a React App? This guide shows only TweenMax, Timeline and the CSS Plugin? Yes, any GSAP tool or plugin you want can be used in a React app. Just be sure to follow the same patterns and guidelines from this article and you'll be fine. I tried the code in the guide and samples, but it doesn't work. What can I do? Head to the GreenSock forums where all your questions will be answered as fast as possible. I want to contribute or post an issue to this guide. Where can I do that? Even though this guide was reviewed by GreenSock and React experts, perhaps something might have slipped away, or with time and new versions, some things should or could be done differently. For those cases please head to this GitHub Repo and inform any issues or create a Pull Request with the changes you think should be added. New to GSAP? Check out the Getting Started Guide. Got questions? Head over to the GreenSock forums where there's a fantastic community of animators. Acknowledgments I'd like to thank the three developers that took time from their work and lives to review this guide as well as the samples in it. I couldn't have done this without their help and valuable input. Please be sure to follow them: Xiaoyan Wang: A very talented React developer. While Xiaoyan doesn't have a very active online social life (Twitter, Facebook, etc), you can follow what he does on GitHub. Jason Quense: One of the maintainers of React Transition Group and part of the React Bootstrap Team. Jason also collaborates in many other React-related projects. Check Jason's GitHub profile for more info. Matija Marohnić: The most active contributor and maintainer of React Transition Group and Part of the Yeoman Team. Matija also contributes in a lot of React-related projects as well as many other open source software. Be sure to follow Matija in GitHub and Twitter. A guest post from Rodrigo Hernando, a talented animator/developer who has years of experience solving animation challenges. Rodrigo is a seasoned React developer and he was one of our first moderators, serving the GreenSock community since 2011 with his expert help and friendly charm.
  2. As the author of GSAP I'm sometimes asked if the Web Animations API (WAAPI) will be used under the hood eventually. My responses have gotten pretty long so I thought I'd share my findings with everyone here. Hopefully this sheds light on the challenges we face and perhaps it can lead to some changes to WAAPI in the future. WAAPI is a native browser technology that's similar to CSS animations, but for JavaScript. It's much more flexible than CSS animations and it taps into the same mechanisms under the hood so that the browser can maximize performance. Overall support is has gotten pretty good but there are multiple levels to the spec, so some browsers may support only "level 1", for example. The hope is that eventually all major browsers will support WAAPI fully. Progress in that direction has been very, very slow. You could think of WAAPI almost like a browser-level GSAP with a bunch of features stripped out. This has led some to suggest that perhaps GSAP should be built on TOP of WAAPI to reduce file size and maximize performance. Ideally, people could tap into the rich GSAP API with all of its extra features while benefiting from the browser's native underpinnings wherever possible. Sounds great, right? Unfortunately, WAAPI has some critical weak spots that make it virtually impossible for GSAP to leverage it under the hood (at least in any practical manner). I don't mean that as a criticism of WAAPI. In fact, I really wanted to find a way to leverage it inside GSAP, but I'll list a few of the top reasons why it doesn't seem feasible below. To be clear, this is NOT a feature comparison or a bunch of reasons why GSAP is "better" - these are things that make it architecturally impossible (or very cumbersome) to build GSAP on WAAPI. Custom easing WAAPI only supports cubic-bezier() for custom easing, meaning it's limited to one segment with two control points. It can't support eases like Bounce, Elastic, Rough, SlowMo, wiggle, ExpoScaleEase, etc. GSAP must support all of those eases plus any ease imaginable (unlimited segments and control points - see the CustomEase page). This alone is a deal-breaker. Expressive animation hinges on rich easing options. Independent transform components The most commonly animated values are translation (x/y position), rotation, and scale (all transform-related) but you cannot control them independently with CSS or WAAPI. For example, try moving (translate) something and then halfway through start rotating it and stagger a scale toward the end: |-------- translateX() ------------| |------ rotate() ------| |---------- translateY() -----------| |-------------- scale(x,y) --------------| Animators NEED to be able to independently control these values in their animations. Additive animations (composite:"add") probably aren't an adequate solution either. It's unrealistic to expect developers to track all the values manually or assume that stacking them on top of each other will deliver expected results - they should be able to just affect the rotation (or whatever) at any time, even if there was a translate() or scale() applied previously. GSAP could track everything for them, of course, but continuously stacking transforms on top of each other seems very inefficient and I imagine it'd hurt performance (every transform is another matrix concatenation under the hood). There is a new spec being proposed for translate, scale, and rotate CSS properties which would certainly help, but it's not a full solution because you still can't control the x/y components independently, or all of the 3D values like rotationX, rotationY, z, etc. This is an essential feature of GSAP that helped it become so popular. Example See the Pen Independent Transforms Demo by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Custom logic on each tick Certain types of animations require custom logic on each tick (like physics or custom rounding/snapping or morphing). Most GSAP plugins rely on this sort of thing (ModifiersPlugin, for example). I'm pretty sure that's impossible with WAAPI, especially with transforms being spun off to a different thread (any dependencies on JS-based logic would bind it to the main thread). Non-DOM targets As far as I know, WAAPI doesn't let you animate arbitrary properties of generic objects, like {myProperty:0}. This is another fundamental feature of GSAP - people can use it to animate any sort of objects including canvas library objects, generic objects, WebGL values, whatever. Global timing controls I don't think WAAPI lets you set a custom frame rate. Also, GSAP's lag smoothing feature requires the ability to tweak the global time (not timeScale - I mean literally the current time so that all the animations are pushed forward or backward). As far as I know, it's impossible with WAAPI. Synchronization (transforms and non-transforms) As demonstrated in this video, one of the hidden pitfalls of spinning transforms off to another thread is that they can lose synchronization with other main-thread-based animations. As far as I know, that hasn't been solved in all browsers. We can't afford to have things getting out-of-sync. Some have proposed that GSAP could just fall back to using a regular requestAnimationFrame loop to handle things that aren't adequately supported by WAAPI but that puts things at risk of falling out of sync. For example, if transforms are running on a separate thread they might keep moving while other parts of the animation (custom properties that get applied somehow in an onUpdate) slow down or jank. Compatibility GSAP has earned a reputation for "just working" across every browser. In order to deliver on that, we'd have to put extra conditional logic throughout GSAP, providing fallbacks when WAAPI isn't available or doesn't support a feature. That would balloon the file size substantially and slow things down. That's a tough pill to swallow. WAAPI still isn't implemented in several major browsers today. And then there are the browser inconsistencies (like the infamous SVG origin quirks) that will likely pop up over time and then we'd have to unplug those parts from WAAPI and maintain the legacy raw-JS mechanisms internally. Historically, there are plenty of cross-browser bugs in natively-implemented technologies, making it feel risky to build on top of. Performance WAAPI has a performance advantage because it can leverage a separate thread whereas JavaScript always runs on the main thread, right? Well, sort of. The only time a separate thread can be used is if transforms and/or opacity are the only things animating on a particular element (or else you run into synchronization issues). Plus there's overhead involved in managing that thread which can also get bogged down. There are tradeoffs either way. Having access to a different thread is fantastic even if it only applies in certain situations. That's probably the biggest reason I wanted to leverage WAAPI originally, but the limitations and tradeoffs are pretty significant, at least as it pertains to our goals with GSAP. Surprisingly, according to my tests GSAP was often faster than WAAPI. For example, in this speed test WAAPI didn't perform as well as GSAP on most devices I tried. Maybe performance will improve over time, but for now be sure to test to ensure that WAAPI is performing well for your animations. File Size To ensure compatibility, GSAP would need all of its current (non-WAAPI) code in place for fallbacks (most browsers won't fully support WAAPI for years) and then we'd need to layer in all the WAAPI-specific code on top of that like conditional logic checking for compatible eases, sensing when the user is attempting something WAAPI can't support, tracking/stacking additive animations, etc. That means file size would actually be far worse if GSAP were built on WAAPI. Some have suggested creating a different adapter/renderer for each tech, like a WebAnimationsAdapter. That way, we could segregate the logic and folks could just load it if they needed it which is clever but it doesn't really solve the problem. For example, some plugins may affect particular CSS properties or attributes, and at some point conditional logic would have to run to say "oh, if they're using the WebAnimationsAdapter, this part won't work so handle it differently". That conditional logic generally makes the most sense to have in the plugin itself (otherwise the adapter file would fill up with extra logic for every possible plugin, bloating file size unnecessarily and separating plugin logic from the plugin itself). So then if anyone uses that plugin, they'd pay a price for that extra logic that's along for the ride. Weighing the Pros & Cons At the end of the day, the list of "pros" must outweigh the "cons" for this to work, and currently that list is quite lopsided. I'd love to find a way to leverage any of the strengths of WAAPI inside GSAP for sure, but it just doesn't seem feasible or beneficial overall. The main benefit I see in using WAAPI inside GSAP is to get the off-the-main-thread-transforms juice but even that only seems useful in relatively uncommon scenarios, and it comes at a very high price. I'm struggling to find another compelling reason to build on WAAPI; GSAP already does everything WAAPI does plus a lot more. I'm hopeful that some of the WAAPI benefits will someday be possible directly in JS so that GSAP wouldn't have to create a dependency on WAAPI to get those. For example, browsers could expose an API that'd let developers tap into that off-the-main-thread transform performance. Ideally, browsers would also fix that hacky matrix()/matrix3d() string-based API and provide a way to set the numeric matrix values directly - that'd probably deliver a nice speed boost. Please chime in if I'm missing something, though. (Contact us or post in the forums) Why use GSAP even if/when WAAPI gets full browser support? Browser bugs/inconsistencies Lots of extra features like morphing, physics, Bezier tweening, text tweening, etc. Infinite easing options (Bounce, Elastic, Rough, SlowMo, ExpoScaleEase, Wiggle, Custom) Independent transform components (position, scale, rotation, etc.) Animate literally any property of any object (not just DOM) Timeline nesting (workflow) GSDevTools Relative values and overwrite management from() tweens are much easier - you don't need to get the current values yourself Familiar API Why WAAPI might be worth a try If you don’t need broad browser support today or any of GSAP’s unique features, you could save some kb by using WAAPI Solid performance, especially for transforms and opacity Always free Again, the goal of this article is NOT to criticize WAAPI at all. I think it's a great step forward for browsers. I just wanted to explain some of the challenges that prevent us from using it under the hood in GSAP, at least as it stands today. EDIT: Brian Birtles, one of the primary authors of the WAAPI spec, reached out and offered to work through the issues and try to find solutions (some of which may involve editing the spec itself) which is great. Rachel Nabors has also worked to connect people and find solutions. Although it may take years before it's realistic to consider building on WAAPI, it's reassuring to have so much support from leaders in the industry who are working hard to move animation forward on the web. 2020 EDIT: Now Brian Birtles is the only one working on WAAPI and he does so on a volunteer basis, so further development of WAAPI has understandably slowed down in recent times.
  3. https://css-tricks.com/tips-for-writing-animation-code-efficiently/
  4. Note: This page was created before ScrollTrigger was released. We highly recommend using ScrollTrigger instead of ScrollMagic. This is a guest post from one of our top moderators, Craig Roblewsky (known as PointC), whose "zero-to-hero" story became one of the most popular posts in the forums. His animation skills are also showcased in the "What is GSAP?" video on our home page which he created. He certainly has a knack for helping people understand challenging concepts in a concise way, as you'll see below. Preface ScrollMagic is not a GreenSock product nor is it officially supported here, but GSAP and ScrollMagic work well together, so many questions about it are asked on the GreenSock forums. This article will not be an extensive guide to using ScrollMagic or GSAP, but rather a quick primer to using GSAP and ScrollMagic together. Demos There are eight demos which can be forked as a starting point for your projects. They represent the most common types of scroll triggered animations. It is assumed that you understand the basics of GSAP and ScrollMagic. I won’t be going into detail about the code in each demo, but simply highlighting the most important aspect of each one. I’ve made them with just a few <divs> or <sections> so they’ll be easy to understand and/or reverse engineer. Scripts The first thing to know is which scripts are necessary. For starters, you’ll need the GSAP files. I recommend TweenMax. <script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/gsap/2.1.3/TweenMax.min.js"></script> Using ScrollMagic requires the main script. <script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/ScrollMagic/2.0.7/ScrollMagic.min.js"></script> To allow ScrollMagic to take control of your tweens, you will also need the GSAP plugin. <script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/ScrollMagic/2.0.7/plugins/animation.gsap.min.js"></script> Finally, for debugging purposes, I highly recommend the addIndicators plugin. <script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/ScrollMagic/2.0.7/plugins/debug.addIndicators.min.js"></script> Please note: it is important to load TweenMax before loading the animation.gsap script. If you try to use the setTween() method and do not have the animation.gsap script loaded, you will see an error in the console. The following demo is an empty shell which loads all the above scripts and jQuery. Demo 1: GSAP, ScrollMagic and jQuery Empty Starter See the Pen GSAP, ScrollMagic and jQuery Empty Starter by PointC (@PointC) on CodePen. Duration You have two choices when using GSAP tweens with ScrollMagic. You can either use the actual tween duration which then plays the animation at normal speed when you hit the trigger or you can allow ScrollMagic to hijack the duration and the tween will be played as you scroll. To use the actual tween duration, you simply omit the duration from the scene parameters. Demo 2: GSAP and ScrollMagic w/tween duration See the Pen GSAP and ScrollMagic w/tween duration by PointC (@PointC) on CodePen. If you'd like the animation to play as the user scrolls, you can add a duration in pixels or percentage to the scene parameters. This is the same demo, but the scene duration is now set to 50%. When hijacking the duration, I’d recommend changing the default ease to Linear.easeNone. Demo 3: GSAP and ScrollMagic w/scene duration See the Pen GSAP and ScrollMagic w/scene duration by PointC (@PointC) on CodePen. Looping to create scenes A common question many users have is how to create the same animation for multiple elements without manually creating a tween and scene for each one. The easy approach in these situations is to use a jQuery each() loop. If you aren’t using jQuery, a vanilla JS loop can be used too. Demo 4: GSAP and ScrollMagic jQuery each() loop See the Pen Looping to create scenes by PointC (@PointC) on CodePen. Pinning Another common animation is pinning an element, playing a tween or timeline and then unpinning. The biggest thing to remember is create a parent container for the actual pinned section. The animation then plays inside that element while it’s pinned. Quite often users will try to pin the sections that are animating and that will not give you the desired results. Demo 5: GSAP and ScrollMagic Pinning See the Pen GSAP and ScrollMagic Pinning by PointC (@PointC) on CodePen. Horizontal Scrolling This can be achieved by animating the xPercent of a parent element containing the sections in your series of slides. Note the duration is 100% * the number of (panels -1). This example has five slides so the duration is set to 400% and each panel move is 20%. This timeline is manually created but could also be created in a loop. Also note the sections themselves are not animating here. The parent container is the only element that is moving. Demo 6: GSAP and ScrollMagic Horizontal Scrolling See the Pen GSAP and ScrollMagic Horizontal Scrolling by PointC (@PointC) on CodePen. Horizontal Pinning A similar effect to horizontal scrolling is a horizontal pinning. Here we have a main pin scene to hold the parent element in a pinned position. Again, the duration is 100% * the number of (panels -1). In this case that is 500%. The first loop creates an animation for each section to move into place with xPercent:100. Using the position parameter offsets each section by an additional second. That space allows the individual animations to play. This first timeline plays in the main scene with the setPin(). The jQuery each() loop creates a simple SplitText animation for each section. Notice the trigger element is always the #pinMaster div. The trick is adding an offset for each section. The index of the loop is used to multiply by the offset variable which in this case is set to window.innerHeight. Learn more about the SplitText plugin. Demo 7: GSAP and ScrollMagic Horizontal Pin, Tweens and jQuery Loop See the Pen GSAP and ScrollMagic Horizontal Pin and Tweens and jQuery Loop by PointC (@PointC) on CodePen. Scroll w/Parallax Finally, it is possible to achieve a neat little parallax effect as you scroll. In the following demo I’ve used a wrapper class with a child and parent div for illustration purposes. Setting the child element to the right and bottom of the parent allows for animating the div up slightly as the user scrolls. The duration in this case is set to 100% but you can certainly set that to your liking. Demo 8: GSAP and Parallax ScrollMagic See the Pen GSAP and Parallax ScrollMagic by PointC (@PointC) on CodePen. Conclusion As I mentioned at the beginning of this article, ScrollMagic is not a GreenSock product nor is it officially supported here on the GreenSock website or forum. But the GreenSock community likes to help everyone so hopefully the demos will serve as a springboard for your scroll triggered projects and a learning resource as you start using GSAP with ScrollMagic. You can also view the entire demo collection here. New to GSAP? Check out the Getting Started Guide. Got questions? Head over to the GreenSock forums where there's a fantastic community of animators. Need additional details about ScrollMagic? Check out the ScrollMagic docs.
  5. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. You may be surprised by how much work GSAP does under the hood to make animating transforms intuitive and performant. This video explains the top 10 reasons you should be using GSAP to animate transform-related values like scale, rotation, x, y, etc. Watch the video Independent control of each component (x, y, scaleX, scaleY, rotation, etc.) Physics-based animations and dragging, plus advanced easing like Elastic and Bounce Snap to any increment or set of values Query values anytime with _gsTransform Relative values ("+=" and "-=") Directional rotation (clockwise, counter-clockwise, or shortest) Two different skew types ("compensated" and "simple") Consistency across browsers, especially with SVG Animate along a path Sequencing and on-the-fly controls All of these features are baked into CSSPlugin (which is included inside TweenMax). See the docs for more information. Happy tweening!
  6. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Read the article here: https://medium.com/@philipf5/patterns-for-using-greensock-in-angular-9ec5edf713fb
  7. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Read the article here: https://blog.usejournal.com/vue-js-gsap-animations-26fc6b1c3c5a
  8. GreenSock

    GSAP 2.0 Released

    Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. We've been getting requests for better support of modern build tools. With version 2.0 we're pleased to announce a switch to ES modules via NPM which should make your building, bundling, and tree shaking even smoother. Don't worry, the UMD/CommonJS flavor is still available and the CDN serves the same browser-friendly files as always. If terms like "UMD", "ES Modules", and "tree shaking" leave you scratching your head, fear not - GSAP 2.0 will work like a champ for you (as usual). There are no syntax, API, or browser-support changes. None. The major version bump was primarily due to the switch to ES modules for NPM users, that's all. DOWNLOAD GSAP NOW NPM, ES Modules, Webpack, oh my! Modern bundlers like Webpack and Rollup just love to snack on ES modules these days, usually grabbing them from NPM. So GSAP 2.0 is extra delicious covered in its chocolatey ES module outer shell. (If you're not using a bundler or NPM, skip this section entirely) npm install gsap Then you can import individual classes like: import TweenMax from "gsap/TweenMax"; import Draggable from "gsap/Draggable"; TweenMax includes (and exports) many of the commonly-used classes so you can also do this: import { TweenMax, TimelineLite, Power2, Elastic, CSSPlugin } from "gsap/TweenMax"; (TweenMax includes TweenLite, TimelineLite, TimelineMax, CSSPlugin, RoundPropsPlugin, BezierPlugin, DirectionalRotationPlugin, AttrPlugin, and all eases except CustomEase, CustomWiggle, and CustomBounce) As a convenience, there's also an "all" file that imports/exports every GSAP tool (except members-only bonus plugins), so you can do this: import { TimelineMax, CSSPlugin, ScrollToPlugin, Draggable } from "gsap/all"; IMPORTANT: if your animations aren't working as expected, it's likely an issue with tree shaking which can be easily resolved by referencing any plugins you're using. Read more. UMD/CommonJS If your environment doesn't accommodate ES modules yet, don't worry - we've got you covered. There's a "umd" directory that contains...you guessed it...regular old ES5 UMD (Universal Module Definition) versions of the files which are compatible with pretty much everything (RequireJS, Browserify, etc.). So you could import them like: //get the UMD versions. Notice the "/umd/" in the path... import { TweenMax, Power2, TimelineLite } from "gsap/umd/TweenMax"; import ScrollToPlugin from "gsap/umd/ScrollToPlugin"; import Draggable from "gsap/umd/Draggable"; What about bonus plugins like MorphSVGPlugin? Obviously we can't distribute the members-only bonus plugins via NPM, so all you need to do is log into your GreenSock account and download the latest zip which has a "bonus-files-for-npm-users" folder with the bonus plugins. Then just plop that into your project, like maybe in your /src/ folder (or wherever) and import them directly. For example, to save some typing you could rename the "bonus-files-for-npm-users" to simply "gsap-bonus" and put that in the root of your project and then: import MorphSVGPlugin from "./gsap-bonus/MorphSVGPlugin"; import SplitText from "./gsap-bonus/SplitText"; You could certainly put the bonus files in /node_modules/gsap/ if you prefer, but most people don't like doing that because it makes things less portable/updatable. There's a brand new page in the docs dedicated to NPM usage. NEW: Custom rounding increments in RoundPropsPlugin Have you ever needed to round animated values to the nearest 10 or hundredth? With the new object syntax in RoundPropsPlugin, you can round properties to various custom increments, not just integers! Simply pass in [property]:[increment] pairs like so: TweenLite.to(element, 5, { x:600, y:100 roundProps:{ x:10, //round x to nearest increment of 10 y:0.1 //round y to nearest increment of 0.1 } }); Watch the video Demo See the Pen RoundPropsPlugin Update by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. NEW: SplitText "specialChars" SplitText recognizes a new specialChars property that allows you to specify an array of special characters to protect. This is typically used for multi-character symbols like in some languages where there are pairs (or sometimes even 4 characters) combined to form a single character. See the Pen SplitText with specialChars feature by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. No need to do this for most emoji's, though, because those are already supported natively in SplitText! Got questions? If you haven't checked out the forums, you're missing out! It's a great place to get your questions answered and participate in the community. We carefully monitor and answer questions there. Or feel free to contact us directly if you prefer. Changelog View the full changelog here (note: version 2.0.0 is just 1.20.5 with a version bump to avoid breaking changes for NPM users) Happy tweening! DOWNLOAD GSAP NOW
  9. Have you ever wished you could run a little custom-logic to determine the values that would be used for each target in a tween? Welcome, function-based values! Instead of defining a number (x:100) or string (width:"100vw") or relative value (y:"+=50"), you can now define most values as a function that'll get called once for each target the first time the tween renders, and whatever is returned by that function will be used as the value. This can be very useful for randomizing things or applying conditional logic. See it in action in the demos below. See the Pen BzmGba by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen.
  10. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. A quick overview of GSAP from Zell Liew to help get you up and running quickly. Read the tutorial.
  11. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. If you've ever coded an animation that's longer than 10 seconds with dozens or even hundreds of choreographed elements, you know how challenging it can be to avoid the dreaded "wall of code". Worse yet, editing an animation that was built by someone else (or even yourself 2 months ago) can be nightmarish. Our article on CSS-Tricks, Writing Smarter Animation Code, will show you how to keep your code manageable and speed up your workflow. Here's just a taste of what's covered: Benefits of timelines Nesting timelines Creating functions that return timelines Using GSDevTools to super-charge your workflow This article contains what we consider to be two of our most important videos. Definitely watch them both. We're confident these tips will truly revolutionize how you approach your complex animations. Read Writing Smarter Animation Code.
  12. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Adobe Animate CC 2017 made big improvements to how external libraries like GSAP can be loaded into your projects. The video below shows everything you need to do to get up and running quickly. This video is intended for audiences that are familiar with working with Animate CC and have some knowledge of the GSAP API. Add GSAP to your Animate CC project Adding external scripts that are globally accessible can be done through the Actions panel as illustrated below. Safe EaselJS properties to animate Animate's HTML5 "export for canvas" renders everything at runtime using the EaselJS library. Every object in Animate is converted into an EaselJS object and it's important to be aware of which properties are available to be animated. For instance, there is no support in EaselJS for width, height, or 3D rotation (rotationX, rotationY). There's plenty you can do with the properties below: x y alpha scaleX scaleY rotation skewX skewY regX regY Since at its core GSAP can animate any property of any JavaScript object, all of the above properties are fair game. You don't even need to load any additional plugins. For more information on the above properties be sure to read the documentation for Easel JS DisplayObjects. Although it may be obvious to some, it's worth stating that CSS properties that the CSSPlugin typically handles like color, fontSize, border, transformOrigin, etc. don't exist in the EaselJS world. Once you understand what properties you can animate, you can tap into all the core tools of GSAP and use the same familiar syntax. var tl = new TimelineMax({repeat:3, repeatDelay:0.5}) tl.from(this.logo_mc, 1, {y:300, rotation:360, scaleX:0, scaleY:0, ease:Back.easeOut}) .from(this.GreenSock_mc, 0.5, {x:200, skewX:45, alpha:0}, "+=0.5"); Animate color properties with EaselPlugin Use GSAP's EaselPlugin to tween special EaselJS-related properties for things like saturation, contrast, tint, colorize, brightness, exposure, and hue which leverage EaselJS's ColorFilter and ColorMatrixFilter. //necessary to cache element before applying filters this.city.cache(0, 0, 800, 532); //left, top, width, height var tl = new TimelineMax({repeat:3, yoyo:true}); tl.from(this.city, 1, {easel:{exposure:3}}) .to(this.city, 1, {easel:{hue:180}}) .to(this.city, 1, {easel:{colorFilter:{redMultiplier:0.5, blueMultiplier:0.8, greenOffset:100}}}); You must load the EaselPlugin into your file in addition to TweenMax if you want to tap into the special features that EaselPlugin provides. EaselPlugin is included when you download GSAP or you can load it from CDNJS. Be sure to read the EaselPlugin docs for more information. Snag the source files Download source files to see the example code above in action.
  13. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Chrome 53 debuted a new "feature" to improve animation performance and graphics fidelity, but it had some nasty side effects that caused quite a few animators to get unpleasant phone calls from angry clients whose ads and web sites suddenly looked blurry and/or stuttery. Every other browser (including previous versions of Chrome) render the same animation beautifully. Chrome's new behavior may also result in WORSE animation performance. A lengthy discussion with the Chrome team revealed some disturbing tradeoffs that animators need to know about, and that could spell trouble with other browsers too unless we band together as a community and make our voices heard. At the heart of the controversy is the will-change CSS property. What is "will-change"? It gives developers a way to say "hey, browser, I'm gonna animate this property, so please do whatever you can to prepare and make it happen smoothly" which often means creating a compositor layer to get GPU-acceleration of transforms and opacity. Think of a compositor layer like a screen-shot of the element that the browser can store on the GPU to move/scale/rotate cheaply instead of re-computing all the pixels on each screen refresh. Read Sara Soueidan's excellent in-depth article here for details. Problem: blurry, stuttering animations What is Chrome 53 doing differently? Chrome is basically saying "In the past, I intelligently managed when and how to rasterize elements, but now that will-change property exists, I'll just make that serve as a blind toggle switch for rasterization instead. If things look blurry, it's not my problem - the developer will need to jump through some hoops (described below) to make things look sharp again." It all boils down to how and when "rasterization" of an element occurs (changing it into pixels stored on the GPU). If rasterization happens when the element is very small, it will be lower resolution. When scaled up, it'll look blurry/pixelated. On the other hand, if you rasterize while it's at its native scale (1) or above, you'll get a much higher-quality image with more pixels. Another key factor is how it is rasterized. Apparently Chrome uses a completely different algorithm for rasterizing an <img> than a <div> with a background-image even though both use identical source files and are sized the same! Here's an example of how they look in Chrome 53: Update: The Chrome team says they've fixed the bug that caused background-image to render differently than <img> (issue 649046) and it should be in the 9/29 release of Chrome Canary. Both factors (the when and the how) are at play in Chrome 53's new behavior (which apparently was a purposeful engineering choice based on will-change). According to this document, all content now gets re-rasterized when its scale changes (which happens up to 60 times per second during animation of scale/scaleX/scaleY properties). That's supposed to keep things sharp, but in this case Chrome's background-image algorithm applies some sort of pixel-snapping which causes that odd vibration during animation. (Update: should be fixed soon). This re-rasterization comes at a cost performance-wise too. Previously, Chrome applied some heuristics to sense when it was appropriate to re-rasterize to avoid blurriness, thus it only kicked in when necessary. But now, you must opt-in to get the layerizing benefits by setting will-change: transform. The Chrome team says this is an "improvement" because it puts the control into the hands of developers, but clearly this shift in behavior comes at quite a price. Overnight, the rug got pulled out from under many animations around the web, hurting performance (due to the constant re-rasterizing by default) and also introducing those visual vibrations when scaling background-image graphics (quite common for sprite sheets). To be clear, this primarily affected scaling animations, not ALL animations on the web. And of course anything where a background-image was used and the element was layerized (making it blurry in Chrome 53). Partial solution: set will-change: transform Complaints rolled in quickly, and the Chrome team suggested that developers go back and edit all their affected animations by adding will-change: transform which would layerize/rasterize those elements (skipping re-rasterizing on every refresh). It's a bit of a nightmare to go back and find all the affected animations and make the necessary edits, but hey, it's just adding one property to the CSS so it shouldn't be too bad, right? Oops, that breaks it in other ways Chrome chose to implement will-change such that it will trigger rasterization at whatever the current scale happens to be, so if you've got an element that starts at scale(0.1) and animates up to scale(1), rasterization happens at scale(0.1), thus it will look terrible (blurry/pixelated) at the end of the animation. Here's an example showing the SAME image animating to identical scales, but flip-flopped starting/ending values: (View the codepen here) Partial solution: toggle will-change back and forth Hold your nose...here comes the hack. In order to trigger re-rasterization of the element to keep it clear, the Chrome team suggested toggling will-change back to auto during the animation, then waiting until a requestAnimationFrame elapses before setting it back to transform...and then doing it again, and again, at whatever frequency the developer wants in order to keep things acceptably sharp. So will-change: auto is being pressed into service to explicitly tell the browser "rasterize me on the next requestAnimationFrame." Yes, you read that correctly: animators must turn **off** the very property whose entire purpose is to be **on** for animation, signaling change. Then toggle it back-and-forth many times during the animation. So we're essentially telling the browser "I'm gonna change this...no I'm not...yes I am...nope..." all while in the process of animating. This doesn't exactly sound consistent with the intent of will-change, nor does it seem performant (Google's document says "Be aware, however, that there is often a large one-time performance cost to adding or removing will-change: transform.") Gotcha: never de-layerize Even if you're willing to follow the advice to set will-change: transform and toggle back-and-forth during the animation to maintain a reasonable level of clarity, there's one last gotcha - if you set it back to will-change: auto at the end of the animation and give it a non-3d transform (to de-layerize it), you'll see a jarring shift in pixels and clarity for anything with a background-image! The Chrome team advises in that case that you make sure it always has a 3d transform thereafter to prevent it from de-layerizing. Following that advice puts you at risk of running out of memory (or hitting performance problems), plus the background-image will always be slightly blurry. Here's what it looks like to toggle between the two modes at the end of the animation: Update: The Chrome team clarified that this was a temporary fix, not a long-term solution. The background-image rendering bug should be resolved soon, and this "never de-layerize" suggestion will no longer apply at that point. The bigger issue, beyond Chrome... The will-change spec doesn't really specify implementation details which means that Chrome's new behavior may be completely unique; Firefox might do something different, and then there's Edge, Safari, Opera, Android, etc. Perhaps Chrome requires that developers toggle back-and-forth to maintain clarity, but what if Firefox interprets that differently, or imposes a big performance penalty when doing the same thing? What if developers must resort to various [potentially conflicting] hacks for each browser, bloating their code and causing all sorts of headaches. We may have to resort to user agent sniffing again (did you just throw up a little in your mouth?). This will-change property that was intended to SOLVE problems for animators may end up doing the opposite. It seems wise for the browsers to step back and let the spec authors fill in the implementation details and gain consensus before moving forward. Another problem: stacking contexts As mentioned in this article, will-change can also affect the stacking context of elements, leading to unintended changes in how things render/stack on your page. So your content may stack differently in browsers that do support will-change than those that don't. More sniffing, yay! To summarize: Before Chrome 53 Just animate stuff. No need to jump through any hoops as a developer to get decent clarity (though the Chrome team points out that there was still some blurriness in certain edge cases that they've heard complaints about). After Chrome 53 Make sure to set will-change: transform if you're animating transforms and want to opt-in to performance optimizations and avoid jittery background-image scaling. But be careful about how it might affect stacking contexts, and keep checking when other browsers decide to implement will-change, as it could change how your content looks. If you're scaling up, make sure you toggle will-change back-and-forth to/from auto during the animation to maintain clarity (but sacrifice performance). Make sure there's a 3D transform applied throughout to prevent de-layerization (which would cause a big performance hit). Don't switch back to a 2D transform at the end (at least for elements with a background-image), or you'll see a jarring pixel shift. (Update: should be fixed soon in Chrome, so this step won't be necessary at some point.) Don't forget to go back and find/fix existing animations that are affected by the new Chrome behavior. Is Chrome going to fix this? As of today, the Chrome team says they've thought a lot about this and feel pretty strongly that the new behavior is an improvement, so there's no plan to change it (that we know of at least). Here are the solutions we proposed (with the answers we got): Instead of putting the burden on developers to manually toggle will-change back-and-forth between transform and auto during the animation, just have the browser natively sense when re-rasterization is prudent and do that automatically which would be much faster than JS anyway. It seems rather trivial for the browser to sense when an element has been scaled greater than a certain delta (like 0.2) and trigger a rasterization. Chrome team's answer (summary): "that's too hard (complex). The browser might get it wrong sometimes, so it's better to have developers do it at the JS level. And JS isn't that much slower than native. It's just a small amount of extra work for animators (or library developers)." The browser could always perform rasterization at native size (scale of 1) or the current scale, whichever is bigger. That way, nobody would run into those nasty blurred images when scaling up from a small value to 1 (pretty common) and there's no need to keep re-rasterizing. Chrome team's answer: "rastering at native size and then scaling that down with bilinear filters in the compositor to something less than 0.5 or so will start to loop noticeably bad." If the goal is to put control into developers' hands, why not expose an API for defining what scale rasterization should occur at, like element.cacheTransform = "scale(1)"? Chrome team's answer: "it may not be so easy to get it right in terms of expressiveness, and requires new APIs...and also to define what raster scale means, which seems quite tricky in general, especially while not over-fitting to current implementation strategies. That might happen later on." The browser should use the same algorithm to rasterize (and scale) anything. The one being used by Chrome for <img> looks great so please use that for background-image too Chrome team's answer (summary): "Acknowledged. We're working on a fix." Instead of turning will-change into a convoluted way to control rasterization in the browser and risk opening a can of worms with other browsers doing things completely differently due to vague specs, roll back the behavior and work with the spec authors to define implementation details and re-approach later when consensus is reached. Chrome team's answer: "the intention of will-change is to give a hint to the browser that the referenced property is going to be animated, and for the browser to take steps to optimize performance for that use case. This is why will-change: transform creates a composited layer: because animating transform afterward will therefore not later have the startup cost and per-frame of creating the composited layer and rasterizing it. Following this logic, further extending the meaning of will-change: transform to not re-raster on scale change is similar, because it will make it faster." Can GSAP fix it for me? Yes and no. We've already experimented with the suggestions that the Chrome team made, but there are a few tricky challenges. First, we're hyper-focused on performance so it's quite painful to have this new Chrome behavior force us to add extra logic that must run on every tick of every tween of any transform-related animation. It probably wouldn't be noticeable unless you're animating hundreds or thousands of elements simultaneously, but we built GSAP to handle crazy amounts of stress because sometimes that's what a project requires, so we're pretty frustrated by Chrome's decision to impose this burden on animators and libraries like GSAP. But yes, we could do the toggling under the hood automatically and accept the performance tradeoff. But another major problem that's totally in the hands of browsers is rendering - we can't fix that jarring pixel shift at the end of the animations of background-image. We can force the 3D transform to remain, but as described above, that leaves things blurry and unnecessarily eats up memory. We work very hard to implement workarounds for browser inconsistencies and bugs like this, but we can't work miracles. We really need Chrome to step up and provide some better solutions. Conclusion There's no doubt that the Chrome team is working hard to move the web forward and deliver the best experience for their users. At GreenSock, Chrome is our primary browser that we use every day, so we're big fans. This article isn't intended to criticize anyone, but rather to bring attention to something that could spell big trouble for animators in the days ahead, beyond the headaches Chrome 53 caused with its new behavior. Hopefully Chrome will roll back the changes and/or implement some of the suggestions above. We'd encourage folks to make their voices heard (on the Chrome thread, below in the comments, with the spec authors, etc.). Perhaps we got something wrong - feel free to correct us or make other suggestions. Ultimately we want to help move animation forward on the web, so please join us.
  14. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. In recent months, the whirlwind shift to HTML5 in the banner ad industry has prompted a slew of policy changes. Publishers and networks are scrambling to answer questions from designers who want to build things "properly" (a term whose meaning can vary wildly these days). Growing pains abound. Shortly after we published an article describing the state of affairs and offering recommendations for a path forward, the IAB released a draft of their new HTML5 ad specs which echoed many of those recommendations. For example, the file size limit for standard ads was raised to 200kb. This was cause for much celebration across the industry. But we're not out of the woods yet. There is still a persistent mindset about how we look at kilobytes that's crippling the web. This article aims to challenge the old paradigm and explain why it's so important to re-assess kilobyte costs. Why limit kilobytes? Conventional wisdom says that kilobytes have a direct impact on load times and consequently user experience. File size limits exist to promote better performance. Period. Does conventional wisdom apply the same way in the HTML5 era? As we modernize our kilobyte-count policies, let's remember what the goal is: performance...or more accurately, better user experience. Not all kilobytes are created equal HTML5 has unique strengths that challenge us to move beyond the simplistic "aggregate total file size" mentality of yesteryear. We need to look at kilobyte cost in a new, more nuanced way. There are four primary factors: Cache status When is 35kb not really 35kb? When it's cached. A cached file has absolutely zero bandwidth cost regardless of its size. It loads immediately. This is particularly relevant in banner ads because there are certain chores common to almost every ad (like animation management tasks) that can be encapsulated and shared among many, many banners. The end user only loads that shared resource once and then it's cached and completely "free" thereafter...for all ads pointing at that file...on all sites. Does it really make sense to penalize ads for using those ubiquitous shared resources even though they're so pervasively cached that they don't typically affect load performance? In the modern world, file size limits should apply to the banner-specific assets that have a direct impact on loading times, not standardized shared resources. Location Kilobytes loaded from a CDN (Content Delivery Network) are typically "faster" because they're geographically dispersed and automatically loaded from the closest server. Plus CDNs have inherent redundancies leading to better reliability. Spread 200kb spread across 24 files will take longer to download than 200kb spread across only 4 files. This isn't particularly relevant in the discussion about shared resources (which should be cached very quickly), but is an argument in favor of loading TweenMax rather than the combination of TweenLite, CSSPlugin, EasePack, and TimelineLite even though they collectively use fewer kilobytes. If the industry remains focused solely on aggregate total file size, it pushes designers/developers toward less capable solutions that use fewer kilobytes even though they don't necessarily affect load times and could be replaced by more robust options that allow more creative expression. Performance yield Some kilobytes are cheap in terms of the initial load but expensive for runtime execution. If our goal is better user experience, this factor should weigh heavily into the overall kilobyte cost equation. Would you rather have a banner that loads 200ms faster with janky animation or one that's super-smooth at runtime but takes a fraction of a second longer to load? Are publishers primarily concerned with displaying ads faster initially or ensuring that their site runs smoothly once loaded? Of course there are reasonable limits either way (waiting an extra 30 seconds for a huge file to load would be intolerable even if it made things run buttery smooth), but in most cases we're only talking about fractions of a second difference. For example, GSAP contains "extra" code that automatically GPU-accelerates transforms, applies lag smoothing, leverages 3D transform matrices, avoids layout thrashing, organizes things internally to make auto overwriting super fast, etc. - would removing those features for the sake of milliseconds on initial load (and zero savings once it's cached) be a step forward or backward? Incentivizing the wrong things If the IAB and publishers don't embrace a common set of shared resources that get excluded from file size calculations... It creates inefficiencies and redundancies - thousands of ads may each contain their own [duplicate] copy of a library like TweenMax, squandering valuable bandwidth. It penalizes the use of robust, industry-standard libraries in favor of custom JS and micro-libraries that probably aren't nearly as capable, well-tested, cached, compatible, or performant. When something breaks, it will be more difficult for the various ad networks and publishers to troubleshoot and support custom JS and diverse micro-libraries. Lots of APIs to learn (or in the case of custom JS, more advanced expertise would be required). GreenSock would likely need to create a minimalistic version of TweenMax that has a tiny subset of the features. We feel strongly that this is a step backward and explain why here. So ultimately, an "all-inclusive" file size policy could actually hurt load times as well as runtime performance. Yet the primary goal of file size limits is to protect performance. Hm. If the industry rallies behind a few popular, well-maintained and performant libraries, exempting them from file size calculations because of their ubiquity, it would not only deliver a better overall user experience, but also make it easier to create high quality banners. There would be fewer headaches for networks and publishers too. TweenMax (GSAP's largest file) technically weighs around 34kb but those kilobytes are the remarkably inexpensive kind. TweenMax is widely cached, it's on multiple CDNs, it packs various tools into a single file (zero "spread"), and it has an extremely high performance yield because of its many runtime performance optimizations. There are so many ads using it already that it has little or no effect on load times. Should it really cost banner ad designers/developers 34kb against their file size budgets? Is it wise to incentivize cooking up their own custom code for handling animation tasks instead? The good news Every major ad network we’ve contacted understands the value of shared resources and is very GSAP-friendly. In fact, virtually all of them have GSAP on their own CDNs and don't count its file size against ads unless the publisher insists otherwise (which is rare). One notable exception is Adwords, but we have been told they're working on a solution. Allows GSAP Excludes GSAP from file size calculation* Hosts GSAP on CDN Advertising.com/AOL YES YES YES Google DoubleClick YES YES YES Flashtalking YES YES YES Sizmek YES YES YES Flite YES YES YES Cofactor YES YES YES Adwords YES YES YES *Unless publisher objects which is uncommon Google DoubleClick is even pioneering a process that will automatically detect when GSAP is used in an ad and swap in its own CDN link to maximize caching benefits. Pretty cool stuff. Conclusion Let's embrace the unique strengths of HTML5 and modernize the way we count kilobyte costs. Let's support policies that incentivize better performance and user experience rather than a race to the smallest total file size for each individual ad. Caching, CDNs, kilobyte spread, and performance yield should all factor into the way we view kilobytes the HTML5 era. FAQ Isn't it unfair if the IAB only recommends a few popular libraries? What about newer or lesser-known libraries? This is an entirely valid concern. The list should be reviewed regularly and the IAB can assess each library's industry support, performance profile, compatibility, and track record for ongoing updates and bug fixes. New contenders could be submitted for consideration anytime. But remember that the key to realizing the performance benefits is keeping the list short so that caching is focused and pervasive. If there are too many "standardized" libraries, it dilutes caching and defeats the purpose. There's no way that everyone will agree on which libraries should be on the list but if we get hung up on not offending anyone or being afraid to appear biased, we'll miss the opportunity to move the industry forward. The list won't be perfect, but not having a list at all is much worse. What happens when a library gets updated? Wouldn't it need to be re-cached? Yes. And trust me - we want libraries to be updated somewhat regularly to work around new browser inconsistencies, patch library bugs, and implement new features that drive things forward. But these updates wouldn't need to interfere with existing or legacy ads - when a library is updated, a new CDN URL would be generated and new ads could optionally point to that version. Those ads would indeed trigger browsers to cache that new version but this should happen very quickly. Most likely within a matter of days the new version would be pervasively cached across the web. Yes, each end user would pay that kilobyte tax once on the first load and then it would be "free" thereafter. Would GreenSock still recommend this policy if GSAP wasn't included in the short list of exempt libraries? Absolutely. This isn't just about getting GSAP an exemption - this is what we believe is best for the industry overall even if GSAP isn't on the list.
  15. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. The following is a guest post by Chris Gannon. Chris is the leading authority on using GSAP with Edge Animate. A veteran of the Flash world, Chris has been applying his animation and design skills to many cutting-edge HTML5 projects. We asked Chris to explain to our audience some of the techniques that he uses in his client work and top-selling components on CodeCanyon.net. The concepts he describes have many practical applications and can serve to radically transform how you approach complex projects. Be sure to explore the demos and study the source code. This is not intended to be a step-by-step tutorial. .wide .content p { font-size:20px; } I love 3D stuff and I'm always trying out interesting ways to add depth to my projects. In this article I'll talk about how the CubeDial below was made, the concepts surrounding its underlying mechanism and how some of the solutions I employ overcome some common issues. Ok, so let's get going. Explore the CubeDial demo In the demo below, spin the dial. Notice that spinning the dial spins the cube. You can also swipe the cube and the dial will spin. Both the cube and the dial spin using momentum-based physics. If you are really clever, you may notice that the cube isn't really a cube, as it has 6 front-facing sides. See the Pen Gannon - Cube / Dial by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. What's it using under the hood? The core functionality is handled by the GreenSock Animation Platform (GSAP). I always load TweenMax because it includes all the things I need in one script load: TweenLite, CSSPlugin, EasePack, timeline sequencing tools, etc. I use TweenMax all over the place not only to immediately set CSS properties (using TweenMax.set() but also to delay the setting of them, to tween them, and to trigger events not only when they start or stop but crucially whilst they're animating too. Next up is Draggable - a very useful and flexible utility that I use in practically all of my projects now as most UIs need something dragged or moved. Finally we add in ThrowPropsPlugin (and couple it up to Draggable) for that flick/throw/physics/inertia that we have all become so used to on our mobile devices. So the three main GreenSock tools I will be using are: Draggable, TweenMax and ThrowPropsPlugin. The Cube's Structure A lot of you reading this will be visually led developers so below is a diagram of what's going on with the cube (ok it's a hexahedron I think as it has 6 sides). Each face of the 3D object is a <div> with a background image. Each <div> has its Z transformOrigin point set a fair bit away from the actual face (behind it) so that when its rotationY is animated it pivots left to right in perspective. This diagram illustrates the 6 faces - their transformOrigin X and Y are simply set to the middle of the faces (50% 50%) but the crucial part is the transformOrigin Z position which is -200px. In the actual code I dynamically work out what that distance should be based on the number of faces but to keep the diagram simple, I use -200px. The dotted center is that value (-200px) and once that's set each face will appear to swing around a point 200px behind itself when you tween its rotationY. By spinning each face around the same point, we achieve the illusion of the entire cube spinning around its center. To programmatically figure out the rotational offset of each face I use this equation: rotationY: (360/numFaces) * i; What wizardry is used to make a 6-sided object look like a cube? There's a simple answer to this and to demonstrate what's going on I have coded it so that all the faces become slightly transparent when you drag the cube. Try dragging and then holding it halfway through a drag - you'll see the other faces are distorted behind (see sceenshot on left). That's because the transformPerspective on each face is set fairly low (meaning exaggerated) in order to 'bend' the other faces behind. I've also added a slider to help illustrate this in the demo at the top of the page. As you drag the slider, the faces' transformPerspective is set higher and higher to the point where if the slider is fully to the right the perspective is so flat that the cube looks more like an infinite slide show. Try dragging it halfway then spinning the dial or the cube. Creating the dial In simple terms, the dial is just a png with some divs with some numbers in them. I do a little loop based on the number of sides in the cube to generate those divs and position them over the dial image. To make the dial "spin-able" literally takes one line of code using GSAP's Draggable. myDialDraggable = Draggable.create(dial, { type:'rotation', throwProps:true // for momentum-based animation }) That's really all you need to spin something. Amazing. However, the dial I use for this project is a little more advanced. I've isolated some of the dial's code in the demo below. Take note of how the numbers stay vertically oriented as the dial spins. Spin the dial See the Pen Gannon - Dial Only by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Using this method keeps everything in sync and it allows for multiple UI inputs - the null object is always controlled by user interaction and its X position is used to determine the rotation value of the dial (if the cube is dragged) and rotationY value(s) of the faces (if the dial is dragged). You can also use it to work out which face is at the front and because Draggable has the brilliant snap function you can ensure that when you release your drag/throw on either the 3D element or the dial it will always animate the null (and consequently all dependent objects) to a position where a face is flat on. Once it's come to rest you can also fire an onComplete event and have something happen - you might want the active/front face to load an iframe or animate its content. Or maybe you'd like a sound to play or you might want to perform a calculation based on the X position of null. Examples of using onComplete to trigger an animation when the spin is complete can be seen in demos for EdgeRotater and EdgeDial. Interacting with the 3D cube Unlike the simplified 2D demo above, grabbing and throwing the cube is a little more involved. The secret here is that you aren't directly touching the cube at all. In fact it would be literally impossible to effectively drag the cube by a face as the face would eventually disappear in to the distance of 3D space and overlap with other faces. It would be extremely difficult to assess which face receives the touch / mouse input for dragging. To solve this issue a Draggable instance is created that has the null object as its target and uses the <div> that contains the faces of the cube as its trigger. In simple terms this means that any time you click and drag on the div containing the cube it controls the x position of the null object, which in turn sets the rotation of each face of the cube and the rotation of the dial. Its sort of like interacting with a touch screen. There is a piece of glass between you and the UI elements you tap. Where you tap on the screen dictates which UI elements respond to your input. In the CubeDial, the div that contains the cube is like the glass screen of your phone. As you move your finger over the container, the app tracks your motion and applies the new values to the null object. Wrap up Ok that's enough of the complexities - it's hopefully not that complicated when you play around with it and adjust some values and see how things react. And if you're not already familiar with this kind of mechanism, once you've got your head around it you'll probably find you use it everywhere as it can be applied in pretty much all of your interactive projects. So that's all for now - I hope you found some (if not all) of this article interesting and/or informative. Admittedly it introduces the concept of null objects using a fairly complex example but it really doesn't have to be complex (or 3D). The 2D null object demo above might be a great place to start if all of this is pretty new to you as it uses a null object at its most basic level. Dive into the entire source code of the CubeDial Demo. My first draft of this article was peppered with gushing compliments regarding GSAP and I was told to tone it down a bit and maybe leave them until the end. So here it is (it's toned down a bit because I'm quite an excitable person!). GSAP rocks my world and the world of all my clients. If you aren't using it yet you are potentially missing out on one of the best (if not the best) animation platforms for JavaScript/CSS3. Its flexibility, ease of use and performance is light years ahead of anything else and if you're not using it and are curious then I heartily recommend you dive in and see for yourself. Jack has created amazing tools for designers and developers like us and Carl does an extraordinary job of explaining how they work in a simple, relevant and, most importantly, usable way. Happy tweening!
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