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  1. See the Pen GSPreloader by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. I had some fun creating a simple little preloader animation with spinning dots that animate in/out with a single JS call. This is what we're using on the new GreenSock.com. All it does is: Create a certain number of DIVs (you decide how many) with border-radius:50% to make them circular Offsets their transform-origin to whatever radius you define Rotates each one to disperse them around a big circle Drops them into a wrapper DIV that's fixed-position, centered perfectly in the window with a high z-index Creates a repeating/looping TimelineMax instance for each dot, animating its rotation "-=360" (360 less than whatever it starts at, thus one full rotation around the bigger circle) and then its skew by "+=360" (this is what makes it appear to "flip") Place each dot's TimelineMax into a master TimelineLite instance in a slightly staggered fashion. This TimelineLite serves as the container for the whole animation, making it simple to control as a whole. To animate out, the main TimelineLite gets paused, and a new tween for each dot animates it from wherever it happens to be, off the screen in a cool way (again, slightly staggered). This would be pretty tough or impossible to do with pure CSS. Features Completely customizable - use the config object to define the number of dots, the size of the dots, the radius of the circle, the colors (as many or as few colors as you want), the opacity and border of the background box, etc. Pure JS. Copy one JS function, and make sure you load TweenLite and CSSPlugin (or just TweenMax which has both), and you're good-to-go Automatically centers itself in the window and sets the container's z-index to 200 Call your preloader's active() method to turn it on or off. preloader.active(true) turns it on, preloader.active(false) turns it off, and you can check its status using preloader.active() (no parameter).
  2. See the Pen GreenSock Home Page Animation by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Here is the demo we use on our homepage. Although it incorporates a few advanced techniques, at its core it is just a bunch of timelines nested inside a master timeline. This technique of nesting timelines is actually quite simple and with a little practice you'll be doing the same.
  3. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. We're excited to announce several new features in the GreenSock Animation Platform (GSAP) 1.12.0 that will increase not only "real" performance, but "perceived" performance as well. The innovative lagSmoothing() feature allows GSAP to automatically heal from CPU spikes that cause lag, all while maintaining perfect synchronization between all animations. And the new "lazy" rendering helps avoid layout thrashing when many animations start simultaneously. Have you ever noticed how scrolling in iOS Safari stops all animations until the scroll stops, and then animations tend to jerk forward? Thanks Apple. The new lagSmoothing() makes it a much more pleasant experience, resuming animations fluidly. These features are already activated by default in GSAP 1.12.0, so you get them "free" by updating. We've created a few demos and videos to help you understand the impact of these new changes. Both features are explained in detail below. Use the demos, watch the videos and be sure to snag the latest version of GSAP. Videos (watch these first) Performance Test of lagSmoothing() and lazy When you click "run test", a tween is created for each blue box to animate it down 150px linearly. The point is to create a "perfect storm" scenario where a LOT of tweens are starting at the same time which would typically trigger the read/write/read/write style recalculation performance killer in many browsers, hammering the CPU initially. Watch how much faster things are when you enable the new features. See the Pen Blog Post: New GSAP 1.12.0 Performance Features by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. "lazy" details Some browsers (notably Webkit) impose a performance penalty for sequential read/write/read/write of DOM-related properties, forcing a costly style recalculation for each cycle so it is better to group reading and then writing tasks (read/read/write/write is faster than read/write/read/write). When you tween a property, GSAP must first read the current values so that it can properly interpolate between the start and end values (even for set() calls because they must accommodate reversion, like when sitting on a timeline that could be reversed). Consequently, when you have a bunch of tweens that are all rendering for the first time concurrently (on the same "tick"), each one would read and then write, resulting in the dreaded read/write/read/write scenario. Normally, you'd never notice a difference unless you have a lot of tweens starting at the same time. As of version 1.12.0, when a tween renders for the very first time and reads its starting values, GSAP will automatically "lazy render" that particular tick, meaning it will try to delay the rendering (writing of values) until the very end of the "tick" cycle which can improve performance. And again, this only happens on a single "tick", when that tween records its starting values. There are certain very specific scenarios when it may need to force an immediate render, and it will do so intelligently when necessary. That's why it's called "lazy" instead of "delayedRender" - it's not a promise to always delay the render, but it's giving GSAP permission to lazy-render if/when it can. It wouldn't delay the render if, for example, you populate a timeline with a bunch of tweens of the same object and then you immediately seek() to the very end of the timeline - it'd need to render the tweens in sequence immediately to make that seek() function properly. lazy is true by default for pretty much all tweens except zero-duration ones (and set() calls) because it is implied that those should be rendered immediately, as you may have a line of code thereafter which depends on the new values being applied. For example: //let's assume element's opacity is currently 1 and we want to quickly set it to 0 and report it... TweenLite.set(element, {opacity:0, lazy:true}); console.log("opacity is: " + element.style.opacity); //1, not 0 because the tween hasn't rendered yet! In most cases, you won't need to set lazy:true because it's the default for normal tweens, but if you create a LOT of set() calls in a row (like in a loop of more than 30), and you're aware of the risks (don't write code that relies on the tween rendering immediately), you could set lazy:true. You can also disable it on a particular tween by setting lazy:false in the vars object. Again, you'll probably never need to worry about setting lazy yourself - the default behavior is ideal for the vast majority of cases. And this setting is only for tweens (TweenLite or TweenMax) since those actually read/write properties. You'd never set lazy:true on a TimelineLite or TimelineMax, for example. New force3D: "auto" feature Previously, you could set force3D:true to cause an element to always apply a 3D transform which typically gets that element its own compositor layer in the browser/GPU, leading to better performance during animation. The primary down side to that technique is that it could eat up more memory. So for example, try animating 2000 elements with 3D transforms on an iPhone and then scroll the page - it gets pretty janky. Now, you can set force3D:"auto" which will act exactly the same as force3D:true except that at the end of the tween if there are no 3D transforms necessary (rotationX, rotationY, and z are all 0), it will automatically switch back to a 2D transform. You get smooth animation, and restored memory at the end. Summary We're working hard to make sure your animations are buttery-smooth on every device and in every browser. Download the latest version of GSAP to get an instant performance boost today. Recommended reading: Main GSAP JS page Myth Busting: CSS Animations vs JavaScript jQuery vs GSAP: cage match CSS Transitions vs GSAP: cage match Jump Start: GSAP JS Why GSAP? A practical guide for developers Speed comparison
  4. GreenSock

    GSAP 1.13.1 Released

    Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Percentage-based transforms (great for responsive animation) Have you ever had to Google "vertically center a div with CSS"? Maybe you used a bunch of jQuery code that measures the width and height of a bunch of elements so that you can center them based on half-width and half-height? Ever used an onresize event to painstakingly recalculate the size and position of multiple elements that you need for a full-screen, responsive animation? We have very good news for you. CSSPlugin recognizes two new special properties: xPercent and yPercent which can be combined with regular x and y transforms to deliver unprecedented positional control. And yes, since these are transforms, they can be GPU-accelerated for outstanding performance. Example: using xPercent for responsive fullscreen sliders / carousels With the new xPercent property you can easily create fullscreen sliders that don't require lots of costly calculations when screens change size, nor do you have to create separate animations for different devices. Notice how in the demo below you can change the width of the black container and the animation seamlessly adjusts. No code trickery behind the scenes, the TimelineMax animation is built only once. See the Pen xPercent / basic by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. To achieve this type of centered layout you could use the following simplified approach //CSS to place origin of all elements in the center or their parent .myClass { position:absolute; left:50%; top:50%; } //JS //center all .myClass elements around their origins TweenLite.set(".myClass", {xPercent:-50, yPercent:-50});//handles all vendor prefixes of translateX(-50%) translateY(-50%) //now we can animate myElement's x/y such that its center is 100px,200px from the origin TweenLite.to(myElement, 1, {x:100, y:200}); CSSPlugin accomplishes this under the hood by prepending a translate(x,y) to the normal matrix() or matrix3d() that it sets on the element. <div class="myClass" style="transform: translate(-50%, -50%) translate3d(150px, 0px, 0px);"></div> As a convenience, if you set the regular x or y to a percent-based value like 50%", GSAP will recognize that and funnel that value to xPercent or yPercent property for you, but we recommend using xPercent/yPercent directly. Thanks to Gary Chamberlain for prompting this feature. Better RequireJS/AMD/Browserify/Node/CommonJS compatibility We have received quite a few requests to make GSAP work with module/dependency tools like RequireJS, Browserify, etc. and we're happy to announce that as of version 1.13.1, that wish has been granted. So, for example, with Browserify you can require("./TweenLite.js") and it'll work. If you're a RequireJS user, snag a super simple example set of files here. A special thanks to David Hellsing for his assistance. Save kb by skipping jQuery. Default selector: document.querySelectorAll() Probably the most common reason that developers load jQuery is to leverage it as a selector engine but all modern browsers support document.querySelectorAll(), so as of version 1.13.1, GSAP uses that as a fallback (after attempting to detect a selector engine like jQuery). That means that you can do something like this, for example: TweenLite.to("li:first-child, li:last-child", 1, {opacity:0.5}); Without loading jQuery. And more Several minor bugs have been squashed too, so make sure you snag the latest files to make sure you're rockin' buttery smooth 60fps animations. Recommended reading: Main GSAP JS page lagSmoothing() and other performance improvements in 1.12.0 Myth Busting: CSS Animations vs JavaScript Why GSAP? A practical guide for developers
  5. GreenSock uses a very permissive license that allows you to use the tools for free for everything except a very specific type of commercial use (if you collect a fee from multiple customers for the same app/product/site that uses GreenSock tools) which makes it extremely accessible and business-friendly while providing a small funding mechanism to sustain ongoing support, enhancement, and innovation. The web is littered with abandoned “open source” projects, but GreenSock has a years-long track record of commitment to the platform. This unique licensing model is a key component of that sustainability. If multiple customers are charged a usage/access/license fee of any kind, please simply sign up for a “Business Green” Club GreenSock membership which comes with a special commercial license granting you permission to do so. Click here for details. Joining the club also gets you members-only bonus plugins, classes, update notifications, and more. Please see the licensing page for details.
  6. No need to worry. Tweens and timelines are automatically made eligible for garbage collection (gc) when appropriate (typically when they finish but if you maintain a reference to an instance so that you can restart it later, for example, it won’t be gc’d out from under you). Basically the system manages gc for you and generally cleans up after itself.
  7. CSS3 transitions have some significant limitations that make them unworkable for a serious animation platform. They don’t provide precise controls over the timing or easing. They’re great for simple effects but the GreenSock Animation Platform delivers extremely precise rendering, so you can do things like pause() and reverse() an animation anytime or skip to a specific time and play from there, etc. Try creating a CSS3 transition that uses an elastic.out or slow motion ease and then jump to 0.72494-seconds into a 2-second transition and pause() only to resume() later. It’s impossible from what I understand. So no, the platform doesn’t make use of CSS3 transitions. However, it is highly optimized for performance. See the detailed cage match where GSAP battles CSS3 transitions where there’s a detailed comparison in several categories.
  8. IntertiaPlugin is a membership benefit of Club GreenSock, so you need to sign up to get that. Draggable, however, is included in all the standard downloads and you don't need a membership to get that; Draggable can be used apart from InertiaPlugin as long as you don't need the momentum-based motion. GreenSock's standard license allows you to use GreenSock tools for free in everything except a very specific type of commercial project (if you collect a fee from multiple customers for the app/product/game/site that uses GreenSock tools) which makes it extremely accessible and business-friendly while providing a small funding mechanism to sustain ongoing support, enhancement, and innovation. The web is littered with abandoned “open source” projects, but GreenSock has a years-long track record of commitment to the platform. This unique licensing model is a key component of its sustainability. If you charge multiple customers a usage/access/license fee, please simply sign up for a “Business Green” Club GreenSock membership which comes with a special commercial license granting you permission to do so. Click here for details. Joining the club also gets you members-only bonus plugins, utilities, update notifications, and more.
  9. Nope. CSS3 transitions and animations have some significant limitations that make them ill-suited for the type of motion that these tools require, so highly optimized JavaScript is used instead. In order to tap into GPU compositing, 3D transforms are used when possible (in browsers that support them) and updates are made using requestAnimationFrame (when available) for maximum efficiency. See for yourself in Chrome Dev Tools - you should see very snappy performance in the timeline. Many other tools like jQuery UI use top/left properties for positioning which don't generally perform as well. These tools have been fully "GreenSocked" so performance is smoking fast, just like the core tweening engine.
  10. Pretty much every major browser is supported including Chrome, Firefox, Opera, iOS, Android and IE even back to version 9! We're not aware of any significant browsers that don't work, but please let us know if you stumble across an issue.
  11. Yes, Draggable is just for DOM elements. But the real magic behind all the fluid motion and snapping is InertiaPlugin, and that can be used to tween any property of any object, not just DOM elements. So yes, you can absolutely get this kind of motion in other contexts but you'd need to wire up the actual dragging logic yourself and then fire off an InertiaPlugin tween when the user releases their mouse/touch. InertiaPlugin can even track the velocity of any property for you too (even function-based getters/setters!), so it's quite a powerful tool.
  12. The only dependency is on GreenSock's core. There are no dependencies on jQuery or any other libraries, although they work great together.
  13. The team from Goodboy went all out on this FWA award-winning site. You can read more about the project here.
  14. See the Pen SplitText: Multiple Split Types by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. This demo shows how you can split text into characters, lines and words (or any combination). Check out how easy it is to animate text once it is split. Be sure to check out SplitText and the [docs id="js.SplitText" linktext="SplitText documentation"].
  15. See the Pen Draggable "Toss" Demo (4col) by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. See many of Draggables properties in action including bounds, liveSnap, snap, edgeResistance and more. This demo is a great starting point to get familiar with Draggable and ThrowProps plugin. Fork, edit and enjoy! Be sure to read the [docs id="js.Draggable" linktext="Draggable Documentation"].
  16. GreenSock

    Bright Media

    Bright Media is an agency with an award winning portfolio. Be sure to check out the ground-breaking animation on this FWA Site of the Day.
  17. GreenSock

    Coin

    Clean animation graces the Coin site.
  18. See the Pen GSAP JS Bezier: Disperse and Converge by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen.
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