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  1. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Are your animations meant to feel playful? Robotic? Slick? Realistic? If they had a voice, what would they sound like? To become an animation rock star, you must develop a keen sense of easing because that's what determines the style of movement between point A and point B. GreenSock's new CustomEase frees you from the limitations of canned easing options. Create literally any ease imaginable. Zero limitations. CSS animations and WAAPI offer cubic-bezier() which is great but with only two control points it's impossible to create more complex effects like bouncing, elastic, wiggles, rough/jerky eases, etc. Plus you can't make an ease return to its starting values (like a ball jumping into the air and falling back to the ground with a bounce). Features Unlimited anchors and control points. Copy/Paste any SVG <path> (including direct copy/paste from Adobe Illustrator). Use CSS cubic-bezier() values (For example, from cubic-bezier.com). Editor has snapping, undo, sample code and other conveniences. Start with any standard ease and customize it. getSVGData() method turns any ease into SVG <path> data for display at the size you define. Extremely optimized for runtime performance. Free for anyone with a GreenSock account. Reading Ease Curves, Editing, and Using CustomEase Here's an in-depth video tour that'll get you up to speed with exactly how to use CustomEase: Ready to play? Check out the new Ease Visualizer with CustomEase support. Click "Custom" to edit the curve as much as you want: Simple Example See the Pen Video: Single Tween with CustomEase by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen.&#13;We strongly recommend creating your CustomEases initially (rather than in each tween) to maximize performance and readability. You then reference them by ID in your tweening code. When an ease is created, it must parse through the points and do various calculations to prepare for blisteringly fast runtime performance during the animation, so executing those calculations when your page/app loads is typically best. Download CustomEase To get CustomEase, you must have a GreenSock account which is completely free to set up. Plus it gets you access to our community forums (a fantastic place to learn and get your questions answered). The widget below lets you sign up or if you're already logged in, it'll give you immediate access to the download zip that contains CustomEase in the "easing" directory. Note: CustomEase is not in the github repository or CDN; it's only available for download at GreenSock.com. [loginwidget]
  2. GreenSock

    GSAP 1.19.0 Released

    Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. GSAP version 1.19.0 introduces some exciting new features for advanced users as well as conveniences for everyone (even the "greenest" novices). The most noteworthy improvements are summarized below: Function-based values Instead of a number (x:100) or string (width:"300px") or relative value (y:"+=50"), you can now define most values as a function that'll get called once for each target the first time the tween renders, and whatever is returned by that function will be used as the value. This can be very useful for randomizing things or applying conditional logic. See it in action in the demos below. See the Pen BzmGba by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. ...and more GSAP 1.19.0 is more ES6-friendly (for example, you can npm install gsap and then import {TweenLite, Elastic, TimelineMax} from "gsap" in your project). Plenty of bug fixes too. See the whole list in the github changelog. DOWNLOAD GSAP TODAY Happy tweening!
  3. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Since launching MorphSVGPlugin, we've made a bunch of improvements and exposed several new features. Here are the highlights... The challenge Before we dive into solutions, it helps to understand the tasks that MorphSVGPlugin must perform in order to work its magic: Convert the path data string into pure cubic Beziers Map all of the segments between the start and end shapes (match them up), typically based on size and position If there are more segments in one than the other, fabricate new segments and place them appropriately Subdivide any segments with mis-matching point quantities If a shapeIndex number isn't defined, locate the one that delivers the smoothest interpolation (shortest overall distance that points must travel). This involves looping through all the anchor points and comparing distances. Convert all the data back into a string Isolate the points that need to animate/change and organize a data structure to optimize processing during the tween. That may sound like a lot of work (and it is) but MorphSVGPlugin usually rips through it with blazing speed. However, if you've got a particularly complex path, you'll appreciate the recent improvements and the new advanced options: Performance tip #1: define a shapeIndex MorphSVGPlugin's default shapeIndex:"auto" does a bunch of calculations to reorganize the points so that they match up in a natural way but if you define a numeric shapeIndex (like shapeIndex:5) it skips those calculations. Each segment inside a path needs a shapeIndex, so multiple values are passed in an array like shapeIndex:[5,1,-8,2]. But how would you know what numbers to pass in? The findShapeIndex() tool helps for single-segment paths, what about multi-segment paths? It's a pretty complex thing to provide a GUI for. Typically the default "auto" mode works great but the goal here is to avoid the calculations, so there is a new "log" value that will act just like "auto" but it will also console.log() the shapeIndex value(s). That way, you can run the tween in the browser once and look in your console and see the numbers that "auto" mode would produce. Then it's simply a matter of copying and pasting that value into your tween where "log" was previously. For example: TweenMax.to("#id", 1, {morphSVG:{shape:"#otherID", shapeIndex:"log"}}); //logs a value like "shapeIndex:[3]" //now you can grab the value from the console and drop it in... TweenMax.to("#id", 1, {morphSVG:{shape:"#otherID", shapeIndex:[3]}}); Notes shapeIndex:"log" was added in MorphSVGPlugin version 0.8.1. A single segment value can be defined as a number or a single-element array, like shapeIndex:3 or shapeIndex:[3] (both produce identical results) Any segments that don't have a shapeIndex defined will always use "auto" by default. For example, if you morph a 5-segment path and use shapeIndex:2, it will use 2 for the first segment and "auto" for the other four. Performance tip #2: precompile The biggest performance improvement comes from precompiling which involves having MorphSVGPlugin run all of its initial calculations listed above and then spit out an array with the transformed strings, logging them to the console where you can copy and paste them back into your tween. That way, when the tween begins it can just grab all the values directly instead of doing expensive calculations. For example: TweenMax.to("#id", 1, {morphSVG:{shape:"#otherID", precompile:"log"}}); //logs a value like precompile:["M0,0 C100,200 120,500 300,145 34,245 560,46","M0,0 C200,300 100,400 230,400 100,456 400,300"] //now you can grab the value from the console and drop it in... TweenMax.to("#id", 1, {morphSVG:{shape:"#otherID", precompile:["M0,0 C100,200 120,500 300,145 34,245 560,46","M0,0 C200,300 100,400 230,400 100,456 400,300"]}}); As an example, here's a really cool codepen by Dave Rupert before it was precompiled: http://codepen.io/davatron5000/pen/meNOqK/. Notice the very first time you click the toggle button, it may seem to jerk a bit because the entire brain is one path with many segments, and it must get matched up with all the letters and figure out the shapeIndex for each (expensive). By contrast, here's a fork of that pen that has precompile enabled: http://codepen.io/GreenSock/pen/MKevzM. You may noticed that it starts more smoothly. Notes precompile was added in MorphSVGPlugin version 0.8.1. Precompiling only improves the performance of the first (most expensive) render. If your entire morph is janky throughout the tween, it most likely has nothing to do with GSAP; your SVG may be too complex for the browser to render fast enough. In other words, the bottleneck is probably the browser's graphics rendering routines. Unfortunately, there's nothing GSAP can do about that and you'll need to simplify your SVG artwork and/or reduce the size at which it is displayed. The precompiled values are inclusive of shapeIndex adjustments. In other words, shapeIndex gets baked in. In most cases, you probably don't need to precompile; it's intended to be an advanced technique for squeezing every ounce of performance out of a very complex morph. If you alter the original start or end shape/artwork, make sure you precomple again so that the values reflect your changes. Better segment matching In version 0.8.1, there were several improvements made to the algorithm that matches up corresponding segments in the start and end shapes so that things just look more natural. So even without changing any of your code, loading the latest version may instantly make things match up better. map: "size" | "position" | "complexity" If the sub-segments inside your path aren't matching up the way you hoped between the start and end shapes, you can use the map special property to tell MorphSVGPlugin which algorithm to prioritize: "size" (the default) - attempts to match segments based on their overall size. If multiple segments are close in size, it'll use positional data to match them. This mode typically gives the most intuitive morphs. "position" - matches mostly based on position. "complexity" - matches purely based on the quantity of anchor points. This is the fastest algorithm and it can be used to "trick" things to match up by manually adding anchors in your SVG authoring tool so that the pieces that you want matched up contain the same number of anchors (though that's completely optional). TweenMax.to("#id", 1, {morphSVG:{shape:"#otherID", map:"complexity"}}); Notes map is completely optional. Typically the default mode works great. If none of the map modes get the segments to match up the way you want, it's probabaly best to just split your path into multiple paths and morph each one. That way, you get total control. Animate along an SVG path The new MorphSVGPlugin.pathDataToBezier() method converts SVG <path> data into an array of cubic Bezier points that can be fed directly into a BezierPlugin-based tween so that you can essentially use it as a motion guide. Watch the video Demo See the Pen pathDataToBezier() docs official by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Morph back to the original shape anytime If you morph a path into various other shapes, and then you want to morph it back to its original shape, it required saving the original path data as a variable and feeding it back in later. Not anymore. MorphSVGPlugin records the original path data in a "data-original" attribute directly on the element itself, and then if you use that element as the "shape" target, it will automatically grab the data from there. For example: TweenMax.to("#circle", 1, {morphSVG:"#hippo"}); //morphs to hippo TweenMax.to("#circle", 1, {morphSVG:"#camel"}); //morphs to camel TweenMax.to("#circle", 1, {morphSVG:"#circle"}); //morphs back to circle. Conclusion We continue to be amazed by the response to MorphSVGPlugin and the creative ways we see people using it. Hopefully these new features make it even more useful. How do I get MorphSVGPlugin? If you're a "Shockingly Green" or "Business Green" Club GreenSock member, just download the zip from your account dashboard or the download overlay on GSAP-related page on this site. If you haven't signed up for Club GreenSock yet, treat yourself today.
  4. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements including a much smaller file size! Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. In recent months, the whirlwind shift to HTML5 in the banner ad industry has prompted a slew of policy changes. Publishers and networks are scrambling to answer questions from designers who want to build things "properly" (a term whose meaning can vary wildly these days). Growing pains abound. Shortly after we published an article describing the state of affairs and offering recommendations for a path forward, the IAB released a draft of their new HTML5 ad specs which echoed many of those recommendations. For example, the file size limit for standard ads was raised to 200kb. This was cause for much celebration across the industry. But we're not out of the woods yet. There is still a persistent mindset about how we look at kilobytes that's crippling the web. This article aims to challenge the old paradigm and explain why it's so important to re-assess kilobyte costs. Why limit kilobytes? Conventional wisdom says that kilobytes have a direct impact on load times and consequently user experience. File size limits exist to promote better performance. Period. Does conventional wisdom apply the same way in the HTML5 era? As we modernize our kilobyte-count policies, let's remember what the goal is: performance...or more accurately, better user experience. Not all kilobytes are created equal HTML5 has unique strengths that challenge us to move beyond the simplistic "aggregate total file size" mentality of yesteryear. We need to look at kilobyte cost in a new, more nuanced way. There are four primary factors: Cache status When is 35kb not really 35kb? When it's cached. A cached file has absolutely zero bandwidth cost regardless of its size. It loads immediately. This is particularly relevant in banner ads because there are certain chores common to almost every ad (like animation management tasks) that can be encapsulated and shared among many, many banners. The end user only loads that shared resource once and then it's cached and completely "free" thereafter...for all ads pointing at that file...on all sites. Does it really make sense to penalize ads for using those ubiquitous shared resources even though they're so pervasively cached that they don't typically affect load performance? In the modern world, file size limits should apply to the banner-specific assets that have a direct impact on loading times, not standardized shared resources. Location Kilobytes loaded from a CDN (Content Delivery Network) are typically "faster" because they're geographically dispersed and automatically loaded from the closest server. Plus CDNs have inherent redundancies leading to better reliability. Spread 200kb spread across 24 files will take longer to download than 200kb spread across only 4 files. This isn't particularly relevant in the discussion about shared resources (which should be cached very quickly), but is an argument in favor of loading TweenMax rather than the combination of TweenLite, CSSPlugin, EasePack, and TimelineLite even though they collectively use fewer kilobytes. If the industry remains focused solely on aggregate total file size, it pushes designers/developers toward less capable solutions that use fewer kilobytes even though they don't necessarily affect load times and could be replaced by more robust options that allow more creative expression. Performance yield Some kilobytes are cheap in terms of the initial load but expensive for runtime execution. If our goal is better user experience, this factor should weigh heavily into the overall kilobyte cost equation. Would you rather have a banner that loads 200ms faster with janky animation or one that's super-smooth at runtime but takes a fraction of a second longer to load? Are publishers primarily concerned with displaying ads faster initially or ensuring that their site runs smoothly once loaded? Of course there are reasonable limits either way (waiting an extra 30 seconds for a huge file to load would be intolerable even if it made things run buttery smooth), but in most cases we're only talking about fractions of a second difference. For example, GSAP contains "extra" code that automatically GPU-accelerates transforms, applies lag smoothing, leverages 3D transform matrices, avoids layout thrashing, organizes things internally to make auto overwriting super fast, etc. - would removing those features for the sake of milliseconds on initial load (and zero savings once it's cached) be a step forward or backward? Incentivizing the wrong things If the IAB and publishers don't embrace a common set of shared resources that get excluded from file size calculations... It creates inefficiencies and redundancies - thousands of ads may each contain their own [duplicate] copy of a library like TweenMax, squandering valuable bandwidth. It penalizes the use of robust, industry-standard libraries in favor of custom JS and micro-libraries that probably aren't nearly as capable, well-tested, cached, compatible, or performant. When something breaks, it will be more difficult for the various ad networks and publishers to troubleshoot and support custom JS and diverse micro-libraries. Lots of APIs to learn (or in the case of custom JS, more advanced expertise would be required). GreenSock would likely need to create a minimalistic version of TweenMax that has a tiny subset of the features. We feel strongly that this is a step backward and explain why here. So ultimately, an "all-inclusive" file size policy could actually hurt load times as well as runtime performance. Yet the primary goal of file size limits is to protect performance. Hm. If the industry rallies behind a few popular, well-maintained and performant libraries, exempting them from file size calculations because of their ubiquity, it would not only deliver a better overall user experience, but also make it easier to create high quality banners. There would be fewer headaches for networks and publishers too. TweenMax (GSAP's largest file) technically weighs around 34kb but those kilobytes are the remarkably inexpensive kind. TweenMax is widely cached, it's on multiple CDNs, it packs various tools into a single file (zero "spread"), and it has an extremely high performance yield because of its many runtime performance optimizations. There are so many ads using it already that it has little or no effect on load times. Should it really cost banner ad designers/developers 34kb against their file size budgets? Is it wise to incentivize cooking up their own custom code for handling animation tasks instead? The good news Every major ad network we’ve contacted understands the value of shared resources and is very GSAP-friendly. In fact, virtually all of them have GSAP on their own CDNs and don't count its file size against ads unless the publisher insists otherwise (which is rare). One notable exception is Adwords, but we have been told they're working on a solution. Allows GSAP Excludes GSAP from file size calculation* Hosts GSAP on CDN Advertising.com/AOL YES YES YES Google DoubleClick YES YES YES Flashtalking YES YES YES Sizmek YES YES YES Flite YES YES YES Cofactor YES YES YES Adwords YES YES YES *Unless publisher objects which is uncommon Google DoubleClick is even pioneering a process that will automatically detect when GSAP is used in an ad and swap in its own CDN link to maximize caching benefits. Pretty cool stuff. Conclusion Let's embrace the unique strengths of HTML5 and modernize the way we count kilobyte costs. Let's support policies that incentivize better performance and user experience rather than a race to the smallest total file size for each individual ad. Caching, CDNs, kilobyte spread, and performance yield should all factor into the way we view kilobytes the HTML5 era. FAQ Isn't it unfair if the IAB only recommends a few popular libraries? What about newer or lesser-known libraries? This is an entirely valid concern. The list should be reviewed regularly and the IAB can assess each library's industry support, performance profile, compatibility, and track record for ongoing updates and bug fixes. New contenders could be submitted for consideration anytime. But remember that the key to realizing the performance benefits is keeping the list short so that caching is focused and pervasive. If there are too many "standardized" libraries, it dilutes caching and defeats the purpose. There's no way that everyone will agree on which libraries should be on the list but if we get hung up on not offending anyone or being afraid to appear biased, we'll miss the opportunity to move the industry forward. The list won't be perfect, but not having a list at all is much worse. What happens when a library gets updated? Wouldn't it need to be re-cached? Yes. And trust me - we want libraries to be updated somewhat regularly to work around new browser inconsistencies, patch library bugs, and implement new features that drive things forward. But these updates wouldn't need to interfere with existing or legacy ads - when a library is updated, a new CDN URL would be generated and new ads could optionally point to that version. Those ads would indeed trigger browsers to cache that new version but this should happen very quickly. Most likely within a matter of days the new version would be pervasively cached across the web. Yes, each end user would pay that kilobyte tax once on the first load and then it would be "free" thereafter. Would GreenSock still recommend this policy if GSAP wasn't included in the short list of exempt libraries? Absolutely. This isn't just about getting GSAP an exemption - this is what we believe is best for the industry overall even if GSAP isn't on the list.
  5. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. The latest version of GSAP delivers some fun new features that open up entirely new animation possibilities. Check out the videos and demos below that show what's so exciting about 1.18.0. Here's a quick summary: New "cycle" property allows you to add rich variations to staggered animations Relative HSL color tweens (affect just the hue, saturation or lightness) Complex string tweening like "1px 5px rgb(255,0,0)" Numerous improvements and bug fixes (see github) New "cycle" property for staggered animations Have you ever wanted to animate a bunch of elements/targets and alternate between certain values (or even randomize them) in a staggered fashion? The new super-flexible "cycle" property does exactly that. Instead of defining a single value (like x:100, rotation:90), you can define an Array of values to cycle through (like cycle:{x:[100,-100], rotation:[30,60,90]}) or even use function-based values (like cycle:{x:function() { return Math.random() * 200; }}). The amount of functionality you can pack into a single line of code is staggering (pun intended). Demo: array-based and function-based "cycle" values See the Pen Basic staggerTo() using cycle by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Advanced "cycle" effects with SplitText See the Pen SplitText with stagger and cycle by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Caveats The cycle property is available only in the staggerTo(), staggerFrom(), and staggerFromTo() methods in TweenMax, TimelineLite and TimelineMax. When using function-based values the function will be passed an argument which represents the index of the current tween. Inside the function body, the scope (this) refers to the target of the current tween (see source of first demo above). Relative HSL color animation Have you ever wanted to tween a color to something a little darker or lighter without having to guess at cryptic hex values? How about tween a hue to 180 degrees around the color wheel? With relative HSL tweening, it's easy. You can now use familiar relative prefixes ("+=" and "-=") directly inside hsl() strings! //30% darker backgroundColor:"hsl(+=0, +=0%, -=30%)" //to grayscale (0% saturation) backgroundColor:"hsl(+=0, 0%, +=0%)" //opposite color (180 degrees around the other side of the color wheel) backgroundColor:"hsl(+=180, +=0%, +=0%)" Relative HSL demo See the Pen Relative HSL color tweening in GSAP 1.18.0 by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Caveats Be careful about doing relative tweens when they could be interrupted. For example, if you have a mouseover that creates tween to +=30% and then a mouseout that does -=30% and then the user rolls over/out/over/out, you'll get odd results because of the nature of relativity. For bullet-proof rollover effects with relative values check out the demo we used in the video: Hover Demo with Relative HSL Values When you tween to a saturation of 0%, that basically loses any kind of hue data - the underlying color/hue of grayscale is non-existent. So then if you try tweening back to a saturation of 80% or something, it'll be red because that's the default zero position of hue. For example, tween a blue <div> to "hsl(+=0, 0%, +=0%)" and then to "hsl(+=0, 80%, +=0%)", it'll end up red instead of blue. That's not a bug - it's just the nature of colors in the browser (they end up in the rgb color space). Tween complex string-based values Complex string-based values containing multiple numbers can be animated without any extra plugins. For example, a value like "10px 20px 50px" can be animated to "4px 13px 200px". GSAP will find each number in the strings (in order), compare them and animate the ones that changed. CSSPlugin already does this for CSS values and it even converts units, but the base engine (TweenLite) can now do basic string tweening. It will even find rgba(...) values and make sure to round them appropriately during animation. This new feature extends to AttrPlugin too which means it can animate the complex strings inside SVG element attributes like the points in a <polygon> or <polyline> or even <path> data (please carefully read the caveats below). See the Pen Complex string-based tweening: simple shape morph by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Caveats This feature is NOT intended to perform complex shape morphing in SVG. It simply animates the numbers inside the strings (in order). Robust shape morphing requires dynamically parsing path data and injecting extra points in certain cases. This new complex string-based tweening lays the groundwork in the core to do a lot of advanced effects in the future, especially via plugins. If you're animating the "d" attribute of a <path> element or the "points" attribute of a <polygon> or <polyline> element, keep in mind that you MUST make sure the number (and type) of points match between the starting and ending values. And since those are attributes, use the AttrPlugin (which is already inside TweenMax). Community Demos City Construction by Sarah Drasner See the Pen City Construction Site by Sarah Drasner (@sdras) on CodePen. GreenSock Cycle by Petr Tichy See the Pen GreenSock - staggerTo with cycle by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Special Thanks This major update is extra special as it contains features that were largely shaped by feature requests and feedback from our community. We really appreciate the strong community that we have in our forums that not only helps each other, but also helps shape the tools themselves. Extra special thanks to Elliot Geno for suggesting cycle and relative HSL tweening, Diaco for being a testing powerhouse, and everyone who voted on the API changes. Now go download GSAP 1.18.0 and make something beautiful.
  6. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Published: 2015-08-07 Google sparked an urgent and rather violent shift away from Flash technology when it announced that Chrome will pause "less important" Flash content starting as early as September 2015. Flash has served as the de facto standard for banner ads for more than a decade. Firefox also blocked Flash after major security issues were discovered and Facebook's security chief called for Adobe to kill Flash once and for all. Amazon says it will no longer accept any Flash ads after September 1. Clearly Flash is on its way out of web browsers. Advertisers can no longer afford its liabilities. Now what? Modern browsers are remarkably capable of handling slick animations natively using HTML, JavaScript, and CSS (collectively referred to as “HTML5” or just “H5”), making them the obvious choice as the tag-team successor to Flash. No more plugins. However, a few barriers are clogging up the transition. Some are technical, some are political, and some have to do with a glaring lack of information. Let's address things head-on, identify some solutions, and get things moving in the right direction. GreenSock has a rich heritage in the banner ad industry, serving as its most popular animation library in both Flash and HTML5. In fact, it’s one of the fastest-growing JavaScript tools on the entire Internet and it was originally born out of banner-specific needs. We obsess about animation in the browser, studying the technical challenges, performance benchmarks, and workflow. Consequently, we’re in a unique position to lend a hand during this transition and perhaps illuminate the path forward. 40 kilobytes? Are you kidding? Years ago, when bandwidth was a tiny fraction of what it is today, the ad industry codified a set of standards for banner ad file sizes. A common limit was 40kb (sometimes even 30kb) including all images, fonts, animations and scripts which Flash compressed into a single amazingly small swf file. Technically each publisher determines its own file size policies, but almost everyone looks to the IAB (Interactive Advertising Bureau) as a standards-setting body, like the W3C for web browsers. The IAB exists to help guide the industry but they don't mandate or enforce anything. When Flash ruled the banner ad landscape, certain file size specs were recommended by the IAB and the system worked well. However, the technology landscape has changed drastically. Bandwidth, page size, and banner budget over the yearsBandwidth (Mbps)Banner budget (kb)Page size (kb)2008200920102011201220132014201540kb33Mbps40kb1,795kb Year Bandwidth (Mbps) Banner budget (kb) Page size (kb) Jan 1, 2008 5.86 40 312 Jan 1, 2009 6.98 40 507 Jan 1, 2010 9.54 40 679 Jan 1, 2011 10.43 40 788 Jan 1, 2012 12.7 40 1081 Jan 1, 2013 15.62 40 1529 Jan 1, 2014 20.83 40 1622 Jan 1, 2015 32.78 40 1795 Page size (kb) Since 2008, average bandwidth has grown by a factor of 5.6 which is remarkably on-pace with the growth of the average web page size (5.7), but the IAB has been cautious about declaring HTML5 specs due to all the complexities involved. They released a set of HTML5 guidelines in 2013, but omitted any file size specs, saying only that HTML5 ads weigh "more" than swf ads. Without specs, many publishers clung to the safe limits of yesteryear. The gatekeepers who impose the 40kb budgets often do not have the authority or wherewithal to allow more than what the latest IAB spec dictates. Consequently, developers are forced to shoehorn HTML5 banners into archaic Flash specs which isn't what the IAB intended. This must change. From our vantage point, fear is driving the industry. Publishers and networks are afraid to raise the file size limits without IAB approval. Some do it anyway, but disagree on exactly how much, leading to wild variations. Developers have no choice but to build for the least common denominator in their ad campaign which is either totally unclear or ends up being the dreaded creativity-crushing 40kb. (UPDATE: The IAB released a draft of its new HTML5 specs.) HTML5 is fundamentally different...embrace that HTML5 banners often weigh 3-5 times as much as a Flash swf but far too many people myopically focus on the aggregate total file size. They miss the unique strengths of HTML5 technology that we should be exploiting - shared resources and browser caching. These have a tremendous impact on loading time and overall performance which is the whole point of the file size limits anyway! Flash compiled all assets into a single swf meaning that if 10 different banners on a site all used a certain library, it got baked into each and every swf. End users paid the file size price 10 times. Multiply that by millions of ads and it gets pretty crazy. In HTML5, however, a library can be dropped onto a CDN (content delivery network) and shared among all banners, thus end users only load it once and it’s completely "free" thereafter...for all ads pointing at that CDN...on all sites. This is a BIG deal. It means that common animation chores like the requestAnimationFrame loop, timing, sequencing, intelligent GPU layerizing, lag smoothing, compatibility workarounds, performance optimization, etc. can be extracted and shared among them all (much like what the Flash Player did for swf files). The unique banner-specific code can be much more concise, reducing overall load times and improving performance. File size limitations should be applied to the banner-specific assets, excluding the shared resources that drive common functionality. Imagine how silly it would have been if the 17MB Flash Player download was included in the aggregate file size for each swf banner. Ad networks and publishers can put a certain subset of tested-and-approved libraries onto their CDNs and exempt them from file size calculations. We're thrilled to see industry leaders like Advertising.com/AOL, Google DoubleClick, Flashtalking, and Sizmek already taking this approach with GSAP. This strategy allows developers to avoid burning hours manually cooking up their own proprietary libraries to fit within the ad specs. Ad networks and publishers win because load times (and costs) are lowered and it's easier to troubleshoot problems when a common toolset is used. They reap the benefits of all the compatibility and performance optimizations in tools like GSAP. End users get ads that perform better, load faster, and look more appealing. Animation technologies and approaches For those tasked with building HTML5 banners, the choices are perplexing. Is it best to use a visual IDE like Adobe Edge Animate, Google Web Designer, or Tumult Hype? Even Flash is capable of outputting HTML5 content. These tools can make building ads easier (especially for designers who don’t want to write code), but a common complaint is that the resulting output is bloated and slow, making them ill-suited for banner ads. Some networks explicitly state that they won't accept ads built with these tools. We'd love to see the visual tools mature and export concise, performant, ad-friendly code because plenty of designers aren't comfortable hand-coding banners yet. Ideally, they'd tap into GSAP under the hood so that designers and developers could collaborate on the same files without worrying about runtime redundancies. There are also network-specific banner-building tools but their proprietary nature makes them impractical for many campaigns. If an agency uses one network’s proprietary tool and then their client asks to run the ad on another network too, it must be rebuilt. Learning how to use each network's proprietary tool can be cumbersome. Hand-coded animations are usually much lighter-weight, performant, and universally accepted, but building them requires a particular skill set. And which underlying technologies should be used? CSS animations? jQuery? GSAP? CreateJS? Once again, answers vary wildly among ad networks and publishers. The goal of this article isn't to provide an in-depth review or comparison of the various tools. Each has its own strengths and weaknesses, but let's briefly touch on some of the major runtime animation technologies: CSS transitions and CSS animations - these are supported in all modern browsers, but not IE9 or earlier. They're cheap from a file size standpoint and they perform well. For simple animations like button rollovers, they're great. However, file size rises quickly and things get cumbersome when you attempt even moderately complex animations. Simply put, they will take longer to build, they won't work in some older browsers, there are bugs (particularly when animating SVG elements), and certain tasks are outright impossible. Additional reading: https://css-tricks.com/myth-busting-css-animations-vs-javascript/ and http://greensock.com/transitions/ and https://css-tricks.com/svg-animation-on-css-transforms/ jQuery - it was never intended to be a robust animation tool, so jQuery suffers from poor performance and workflow issues. Most ad networks strongly advise against using it. GSAP is up to 20x faster. Additional reading: http://greensock.com/jquery/ CreateJS - Adobe Flash can optionally export to this canvas-based library. You can't just publish existing Flash banners to CreateJS (you must do some conversion work and leverage JavaScript instead of ActionScript) but for designers who are already used to the Flash interface, this can be a boon. One down side to canvas-based libraries is that you lose accessibility (the browser sees it as essentially a blob of pixels), but that's probably not a top priority for banners. File size can also become a concern (possibly mitigated by CDN standardization). You can use GSAP to animate CreateJS content. Additional reading: http://createjs.com Zepto - like a lightweight version of jQuery that uses CSS transitions under the hood for animations. Zepto is better than jQuery for banners, but it suffers from similar workflow issues as well as the inconsistencies/bugs inherent in CSS transitions/animations (like with SVG transforms). Active development seems to have stalled. Additional reading: http://zeptojs.com Web Animations - a new spec being worked on that has a lot of promise, but it just isn't a realistic contender at this point because it is in flux and several browser vendors remain noncommittal about ever supporting it. The polyfill has performance problems. Additional reading: http://w3c.github.io/web-animations GSAP - Widely recognized as the performance leader, GSAP solves all kinds of real-world animation problems from browser inconsistencies to workflow headaches (far too many to go into here). The Flash banner ad community is full of designers and developers who use GSAP daily, making it much easier to transition to HTML5; no new syntax to learn. Ongoing development and support have a solid track record for over 7 years. Additional reading: http://greensock.com/why-gsap/ Recommendations Based on our experience and the results from our survey, we suggest the following: Standardize a few JavaScript libraries Ideally, the IAB would equip the community with a short list of recommended libraries that get CDN-ified and exempted from file size calculations. Historically, the IAB has been extremely reluctant to officially endorse any third party tools. That's understandable - it could be seen as playing favorites or unfairly excluding someone's favorite library. However, without specific recommendations, the HTML5 landscape is so fractured and complex that it will result in a free-for-all (which is basically what it is now). The IAB can set the tone and move the focus away from aggregate total file sizes and into the modern era that leverages shared resources and browser caching to deliver excellent performance. It is imperative that this list of "recommended" libraries be very short, otherwise the caching impact will be diluted. The IAB can run their own independent tests and look at performance, features, compatibility, support, workflow benefits, and overall industry demand to determine which libraries get recommended. Of course we feel strongly that GSAP belongs on that list because: It is the top performer. It has widespread industry acceptance, both in Flash and HTML5. It's recommended by Google, used by the biggest brands in the world, etc. It is framework-agnostic, super flexible and robust, able to animate anything. It is professionally supported, yet free to use in banner ads. Modernize file size specs Given the 5.6x growth factor of bandwidth and page size since 2008, it seems entirely reasonable to adjust the old 40kb limit to 200kb (5x) for the modern HTML5 era. This is entirely consistent with some in-depth testing that has been done recently aimed at identifying the file size threshold at which real-world users perceive a dip in performance. The results showed that the threshold was upwards of 250kb. Combined file size isn't the only issue that contributes to slow load times; the number of server requests can have a significant impact. A single 300kb file can often load faster than 200kb split among 20 files. HTML5 banners can't realistically mash everything into one file, though. Doing so would kill the benefits of caching and resource sharing. So a reasonable compromise seems to be a 10-file maximum. Sprite sheets can be used to combine images. Given all the factors, we'd recommend the following for standard (non-rich media) ads: 200kb combined total (gzipped) Maximum of 10 files. Any additional must be loaded "politely" (after the parent page finishes loading) Shared CDN resources like GSAP don't count toward these totals. Some have suggested slicing the 200kb standard limit into two parts - a 50kb initial load, and then the rest "politely" loads. However, we advise against this for standard (non-rich media) ads because it unnecessarily complicates the design and production process as well as QA and enforcement. Rich media ads will likely require more files and kb than the limits mentioned above, and those should be polite-loaded. By "rich media", we mean ads that contain video or expand or perform API calls (like feeding the viewer's zip code to a backend script), etc. Update documentation and guidelines It is surprisingly difficult to get answers to some of the most basic questions when preparing a banner ad campaign for even the biggest networks and publishers. What are the file size limits? Which libraries can be used? Do CDN resources count against the total file size? Is there a network-specific CDN link for common libraries? Online docs either have outdated information or none at all related to HTML5. Drop support for IE8 Legacy IE support is not just painful for developers, it's exceedingly expensive for advertisers. Certain effects are outright impossible, so creatives must learn about the IE8 pitfalls and adjust their designs. Developers are forced to rebuild entire portions, implement workarounds and perform extra testing, all to accommodate a tiny fraction of the web audience who probably don't represent the demographic that advertisers are targeting anyway. This was never an issue for Flash, but it's a HUGE issue for HTML5 because it relies on native browser technologies that are absent from older browsers like IE8. Our recommendation is to draw a line in the sand and drop support for IE8 for sure, and potentially even IE9. Consider SVG instead of iframes Displaying ads inside an iframe is nice for security, but it forces ads into a strict rectangular space (ruling out fancy overlays with transparency/mask effects that show the main web page behind) and there's a performance price too. SVG is widely supported and it has some excellent transparency/masking capabilities, plus it can serve as a single container for an entire ad (see Chris Gannon's blog post and video)! Further testing needs to be done to better understand the performance and security implications, but it certainly seems like a worthwhile contender. Create a gallery of sample banners and templates Rather than pouring over specs and instructions and then building something from scratch, most developers prefer to analyze banners that already conform to the standards and use one as a template for their own project. Each network has different API's and ways you must track clicks, etc., so it would be lovely if each one provided a gallery of demos at each standard size. Codepen.io is a great place to host a collection because it's so easy to see (and edit) the HTML, CSS, and JS as well as the result all in one place. Developers can simply click the "fork" button and start producing their own version of that banner immediately in the browser. Codepen even integrates nicely with crossbrowsertesting.com for easy QA. Adjust client expectations As the industry transitions from Flash to HTML5, clients must be made aware of the design, budget, and schedule implications. HTML5 banners take more time to produce and test, therefore they will be more expensive. Plus there are certain effects that were easy in Flash but are virtually impossible in HTML5, so creative expectations need to be adjusted as well. Common GreenSock Questions With the broader discussion out of the way, let's narrow our focus to GreenSock for a moment and address some of the most frequently asked questions: Which networks support GSAP? All networks that we're aware of allow GSAP, and most even exempt its file size from the ads and host it on their CDNs. Google DoubleClick recommends GSAP for complex animations. Here's a breakdown of how some of the major players stack up: Allows GSAP Excludes GSAP from file size calculation* Hosts GSAP on CDN Advertising.com/AOL YES YES YES Google DoubleClick YES YES YES Flashtalking YES YES YES Sizmek YES YES YES Flite YES YES YES Cofactor YES YES YES AdWords YES YES YES *Unless publisher objects which is uncommon TweenMax is too big! Where's TweenNano? Let's face it: TweenMax (the most robust tool in the GSAP suite) is overkill for many banners that are only doing simple fades and movement. Wouldn't it be smart for GreenSock to create a super-small animation engine that's targeted at banners and only has the basic features? In the Flash days, we did exactly that and called it "TweenNano". It weighed about 2kb. On the surface, it sounds like a great idea but there are several reasons we avoided TweenNano in the HTML5 toolset: Caching - this is the biggest factor; loading the JavaScript file is a one-time hit and then the browser caches it, mitigating the entire loading issue on every page thereafter. Realistically, TweenNano must include a subset of TweenLite and CSSPlugin features and weigh at least 8kb; how much longer would it take for the average user to load an extra 25kb for TweenMax? It's not even noticeable (less than one second). So it doesn't seem like a worthwhile tradeoff to rip out all those features just to gain a fraction of a second only the first time it loads, especially for banners where caching and resource sharing could be used so effectively. If networks toss TweenMax.min.js on their CDNs, it effectively becomes "free" (zero load time) very quickly, giving them instant access to all the timeline tools plus a bunch of advanced plugins. Thus it seems smarter to press the full-featured, super-fast TweenMax engine into service rather than a sliced-down TweenNano with limited effects. Performance - GSAP has been engineered with a huge priority on performance which sometimes comes with a file size tradeoff. We could accomplish the same tasks with less code in places, but runtime performance would suffer. We feel strongly that when it comes to animation, it's wiser to pay a small up-front kb tax (only a fraction of a second in most cases) in order to get maximum runtime performance. Animations must look smooth and conserve battery power. Think of it this way: would you rather buy a computer that boots up 2 seconds faster or one that's 30% faster all the time (after it boots)? Flexibility/Creativity - what if you want to animate a non-essential CSS property like boxShadow or slide along a curve or scrub through a timeline? Even if there's just one part of your banner that needs a more advanced feature, it presents a dilemma. Creativity is hampered. Again, the fraction of a second one-time cost difference for TweenMax seems well worth it for the added flexibility and peace of mind. API confusion - years ago, Adobe created a lightweight version of the Flash Player dubbed "Flash Lite" with similar aspirations (bake only the essentials into a lighter weight flavor), but it was a complete failure. One of the problems was that developers couldn't remember which features were available in the regular Flash Player versus Flash Lite. Likewise, TweenNano's feature disparity would create some confusion/frustration. What about creating a tool that lets users select only the features they need, and then it spits out a customized stripped-down version of TweenMax? Again, this sounds appealing, but it would likely lead to worse load times because instead of having one common TweenMax that gets shared and cached, every banner would have its own different (and partially redundant) flavor to load. Ultimately, we're committed to delivering the tools that are needed most, so if the broader industry decides not to leverage shared resources and publishers insist on sticking to all-inclusive aggregate file size totals, we're open to creating TweenNano. Luckily, it looks like there's excellent momentum behind TweenMax getting CDN-ified and exempted from file size limits. In our opinion, that's definitely the smartest approach. What's so special about GSAP? It's beyond the scope of this article to explain all the benefits of using GSAP; see http://greensock.com/why-gsap/ for a summary. If you're still wondering what the big deal is, we'd encourage you to find someone who is proficient with it and ask about their experience. Usually people who take the time to learn it have a "light bulb" moment pretty quickly and never want to go back to using other libraries or CSS. It's difficult to explain to the uninitiated - lists of features don't really do it justice. It's not merely about performance (although that's a biggie) - it's about feeling empowered to animate almost anything you can imagine with minimal code. Do I need a commercial license to use GSAP in banner ads? GreenSock's standard "no charge" license covers usage in banner ads even if you get paid a one-time fee to produce the banners. We fully encourage the use of GSAP in banner ads and beyond. You may want to check out Club GreenSock for some bonus plugins that allow you to easily achieve advanced effects. Is anyone building a GUI for GSAP? A visual tool for building GSAP-based animations is a popular request, and we have been approached by several large and small companies about the possibilities, but there's nothing rock solid to report yet. We hope that companies like Adobe and Google will offer export options from their tools that leverage GSAP as the runtime engine and produce well-formatted, concise code. There's a pretty neat tool called Animachine that's in alpha and can be installed as a Chrome extension. It shows promise, but isn’t entirely stable at this point. There are also several online GSAP-based banner builders: http://html5maker.com/, https://tweenui.com/, and http://www.loxiastudio.com. Where can I get GSAP training? You can have GreenSock come directly to your organization and sit with your team to get them up to speed quickly. We can even convert one of your Flash banners and then teach you how we did it which is an excellent way to learn banner-specific tricks. The Q&A sessions are invaluable. We have limited slots available, though, so contact us as soon as possible to get your event scheduled. There are plenty of other learning resources available: GreenSock's getting started video/article GreenSock's learning resources New GreenSock eBook (published by Noble Desktop) Lynda.com course ihatetomatoes.net course (intermediate/advanced) Noble Desktop class in NYC 02Geek course Egghead.io The GreenSock forums are a fantastic place to not only ask your question(s), but also poke around and see what others are saying. It's one of the best places to learn even if you never ask a question. There are plenty of demos on codepen.io as well. For inspiration, we'd suggest following these people: Chris Gannon Sarah Drasner Petr Tichy Sara Soueidan Diaco.ml Blake Bowen Ico Dimchev UPDATE: The IAB released a draft of its new HTML5 specs and is soliciting public feedback before finalizing the document. The outstanding news is that they agreed with our assessment regarding a 200kb limit for standard ads. The IAB is expected to release an update to its HTML5 Best Practices guide soon which will likely contain a short list of JavaScript libraries that are recommended for exemption from file size calculations. We're confident GSAP will be on that list. #network-support { border-spacing: 1px; border-collapse: separate; background-color: #ccc; width: 830px; line-height: 1.1em; } #network-support thead td { background-color: #333; color: white; } #network-support td { text-align: center; vertical-align: bottom; font-family: Asap, Arial, sans-serif; padding: 10px 14px; background-color: white; } #network-support .network { text-align: left; font-weight: bold; } #network-support .yes { background-image: url(/wp-content/themes/greensock/images/licencing-check.png); } #network-support .yes, #network-support .no { background-color: white; background-repeat: no-repeat; vertical-align: middle; background-position: center center; background-size: 35px 35px; color: transparent; } .disclaimer { font-size: 11px; color: #777; padding: 2px; }
  7. When it comes to animation, SVG and GSAP go together like peanut butter and jelly. Chocolate and strawberries. Bacon and...anything. SVG offers the sweet taste of tiny file size plus excellent browser support and the ability to scale graphics infinitely without degradation. They're perfect for building a rich, responsive UI (which includes animation, of course). However, just because every major browser offers excellent support for displaying SVG graphics doesn't mean that animating them is easy or consistent. Each browser has its own quirks and implementations of the SVG spec, causing quite a few challenges for animators. For example, some browsers don't support CSS animations on SVG elements. Some don't recognize CSS transforms (rotation, scale, etc.), and implementation of transform-origin is a mess. Don't worry, GSAP smooths out the rough spots and harmonizes behavior across browsers for you. There are quite a few unique features that GSAP offers specifically for SVG animators. Below we cover some of the things that GSAP does for you and then we have a list of other things to watch out for. This page is intended to be a go-to resource for anyone animating SVG with GSAP. Outline Challenges that GSAP solves for you Scale, rotate, skew, and move using 2D transforms Set the transformOrigin (the point around which rotation and scaling occur) Set transformOrigin without unsightly jumps Transform SVG elements around any point in the SVG canvas Animate SVG attributes like cx, cy, radius, width, etc. Use percentage-based x/y transforms Drag SVG elements (with accurate bounds and hit-testing) Move anything (DOM, SVG) along a path including autorotation, offset, looping, and more Animate SVG strokes Morph SVG paths with differing numbers of points Tips to Avoid Common Gotchas Limitations of SVG Browser support Inspiration Awesome SVG Resources Get Started Quickly with GSAP Challenges that GSAP solves for you GSAP does the best that it can to normalize browser issues and provide useful tools to make animate SVG as easy as it can be. Here are some of the challenges that using GSAP to animate SVG solves for you: Scale, rotate, skew, and move using 2D transforms When using GSAP, 2D transforms on SVG content work exactly like they do on any other DOM element. gsap.to("#gear", {duration: 1, x: 100, y: 100, scale: 0.5, rotation: 180, skewX: 45}); Since IE and Opera don't honor CSS transforms at all, GSAP applies these values via the SVG transform attribute like: <g id="gear" transform="matrix(0.5, 0, 0, 0.5, 100, 0)">...</g> When it comes to animating or even setting 2D transforms in IE, CSS simply is not an option. #gear { /* won't work in IE */ transform: translateX(100px) scale(0.5); } Very few JavaScript libraries take this into account, but GSAP handles this for you behind the scenes so you can get amazing results in IE with no extra hassles. Set the transformOrigin (the point around which rotation and scaling occur) Another unique GSAP feature: use the same syntax you would with normal DOM elements and get the same behavior. For example, to rotate an SVG <rect> that is 100px tall by 100px wide around its center you can do any of the following: gsap.to("rect", {duration: 1, rotation: 360, transformOrigin: "50% 50%"}); //percents gsap.to("rect", {duration: 1, rotation: 360, transformOrigin: "center center"}); //keywords gsap.to("rect", {duration: 1, rotation: 360, transformOrigin: "50px 50px"}); //pixels The demo below shows complete parity between DOM and SVG when setting transformOrigin to various values. We encourage you to test it in all major browsers and devices. With MorphSVG, you can Morph <path> data even if the number (and type) of points is completely different between the start and end shapes! Most other SVG shape morphing tools require that the number of points matches. Morph a <polyline> or <polygon> to a different set of points Convert and replace non-path SVG elements (like <circle>, <rect>, <ellipse>, <polygon>, <polyline>, and <line>) into identical <path>s using MorphSVGPlugin.convertToPath(). Optionally define a "shapeIndex" that controls how the points get mapped. This affects what the in-between state looks like during animation. Simply feed in selector text or an element (instead of passing in raw path data) and the plugin will grab the data it needs from there, making workflow easier. MorphSVGPlugin is a bonus plugin for Club GreenSock members (Shockingly Green and Business Green). Tips to Avoid Common Gotchas There are some things that GSAP can't solve for you. But hopefully this part of the article can help prepare you to avoid them ahead of time! Here are some things to keep in mind when creating and animating SVGs. Vector editor/SVG creation tips: When creating an SVG in Illustrator or Inkscape, create a rectangle the same size as your artboard for when you copy elements out of your vector editor and paste them into a code editor (how-to here). How to quickly reverse the direction of a path in Illustrator (Note: If the Path Direction buttons are not visible in the attributes panel, click the upper right menu of that panel and choose 'Show All'): Open path: Select the pen tool and click on the first point of your path and it will reverse the points. Closed path: Right click the path and make it a compound path, choose menu-window-attributes and then use the Reverse Path Direction buttons. If you're morphing between elements it might be useful to add extra points yourself to simpler shapes where necessary so that MorphSVG doesn't have to guess at where to add points. You can think of masks as clip-paths that allow for alpha as well. When using masks, it's often important to specify which units to use. Use a tool like SVGOMG (or this simpler tool) to minify your SVGs before using them in your projects. Code/animation-related tips: Always set transforms of elements with GSAP (not just CSS). There are quite a few browser bugs related to getting transform values of elements which GSAP can't fix or work around so you should always set the transform of elements with GSAP if you're going to animate that element with GSAP. Always use relative values when animating an SVG element. Using something like y: "+=100" allows you to change the SVG points while keeping the same animation effect as hard coding those values. You can fix some rendering issues (especially in Chrome) by adding a very slight rotation to your tween(s) like rotation: 0.01. If you're having performance issues with your issue, usually the issue is that you have too many elements or are using filters/masks too much. For more information, see this post focused on performance with SVGs. You might like injecting SVGs into your HTML instead of keeping it there directly. You can do this by using a tool like Gulp. You can easily convert between coordinate systems by using MotionPathPlugin's helper functions like .convertCoordinates(). Technique tips/resources: You can animate the viewBox attribute (demo)! You can animate (draw) a dashed line by following the technique outlined in this post. You can animate (draw) lines with varied widths by following the technique outlined in this post. You can animate (draw) handwriting effects by following the technique outlined in this post. You can create dynamic SVG elements! You can animate (draw) a "3D" SVG path. You can fake nested SVG elements (which will be available in SVG 2) by positioning the inner SVG with GSAP and scaling it (demo). You can fake 3D transforms (which will be available in SVG 2) in some cases by either Faking the transform that you need. For example sometimes rotationYs can be replaced by a scaleX instead. Applying the transform to a container instead. If you can limit the elements within the SVG to just the ones you want to transform, this is a great approach. For example, applying a rotationY to the <svg> or <div> containing a <path> instead of applying it to the <path> itself. Limitations of SVG The current SVG spec does not account for 3D transforms. Browser support is varied. Best to test thoroughly and have fallbacks in place. Most browsers don't GPU-accelerate SVG elements. GSAP can't change that. Browser support All SVG features in this article will work in IE9+ and all other major desktop and mobile browsers unless otherwise noted. If you find any cross-browser inconsistencies please don't hesitate to let us know in our support forums. Inspiration The Chris Gannon GSAP Animation collection is great for seeing more SVG animations made with GSAP. Be sure to also check out Chris Gannon's full portfolio on CodePen and follow him on Twitter for a steady influx of inspiration. Awesome SVG Resources SVG Tutorials - MotionTricks The SVG Animation Masterclass - Cassie Evans Understanding SVG Coordinate Systems and Transformations - Sara Soueidan Improving SVG Runtime Performance - Taylor Hunt SVG tips - Louis Hoebregts A Compendium of SVG Information - Chris Coyier Making SVGs Responsive with CSS - Sara Soueidan viewBox newsletter (SVG focus) - Cassie Evans and Louis Hoebregts Get Started Quickly with GSAP Below are a few resources that will get you up and running in no time: Getting Started Guide with Video Sequence Animations like a Pro (video) GSAP Documentation
  8. GreenSock

    GSAP 1.16.x Update

    Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. We're constantly improving GSAP to solve the problems you face as a developer/designer. In the recent release of GSAP 1.16.0 and 1.16.1, Draggable got some big upgrades and SVG support has never been better across the whole platform. Here's a summary of what's most exciting in 1.16.x: Draggable gets "autoScroll" What happens if you're dragging an element inside a scrollable container (or page) and you reach the edge? Wouldn't it be nice if it automatically scrolled in that direction for you? Wouldn't it be even cooler if it applied variable-speed scrolling based on how close your mouse/touch is to the edge, and it handle MULTIPLE containers? Wish granted. Video tour Interactive demo See the Pen Draggable autoScroll by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Draggable's new getDirection() method Sometimes it's useful to know which direction an element is dragged (left | right | up | down | left-up | left-down | right-up | right-down), or maybe you'd like to know which direction it is compared to another element. That's precisely what getDirection() is for. Video tour Interactive demo See the Pen Draggable getDirection() by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Easier SVG animation with svgOrigin For SVG elements, CSSPlugin recognizes a new svgOrigin special property that works exactly like transformOrigin but it uses the SVG's global coordinate space instead of the element's local coordinate space. This can be very useful if, for example, you want to make a bunch of SVG elements rotate around a common point. So you can do TweenLite.to(svgElement, 1, {rotation:270, svgOrigin:"250 100"}) if you'd like to rotate svgElement as though its origin is at x:250, y:100 in the SVG canvas's global coordinates. It also records the value in a data-svg-origin attribute so that it can be parsed back in. So for SVG elements, you can choose whichever one fits your project better: transformOrigin or svgOrigin. Sara Soueidan used this feature in her excellent Circulus tool demo. Interactive demo See the Pen GSAP svgOrigin by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. For more information about how GSAP has solved cross-browser SVG challenges, see https://css-tricks.com/svg-animation-on-css-transforms/ and for performance data, see https://css-tricks.com/weighing-svg-animation-techniques-benchmarks/. More Draggable improvements Draggable exposes a lockedAxis property so that you can find out whether it's "x" or "y" (assuming you set lockAxis:true in the config object). New onLockAxis callback that fires whenever the axis gets locked. Several performance optimizations were made to Draggable, particularly for transforms and scrolling. Draggable allows you to native touch-scroll in the opposite direction as Draggables that are limited to one axis. For example, a Draggable of type:"x" or "left" permit native touch-scrolling in the vertical direction, and type:"y" or "top" permit native horizontal touch-scrolling. SVG support is better than ever. It plots the rotational origin accurately, for example. Touch support has been improved as well. Bug fixes See the github changelogs for 1.16.0 and 1.16.1 for a complete list. Conclusion If you're already using GSAP and/or Draggable, we definitely recommend grabbing the latest version. If you haven't tried GSAP yet, what are you waiting for? Head over to the Getting Started article/video now and you'll be having fun in no time. Helpful links Getting Started with GSAP Draggable demo and main page Draggable docs GSAP docs Got questions? Visit the forums
  9. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. The following is a guest post by Chris Gannon. Chris is the leading authority on using GSAP with Edge Animate. A veteran of the Flash world, Chris has been applying his animation and design skills to many cutting-edge HTML5 projects. We asked Chris to explain to our audience some of the techniques that he uses in his client work and top-selling components on CodeCanyon.net. The concepts he describes have many practical applications and can serve to radically transform how you approach complex projects. Be sure to explore the demos and study the source code. This is not intended to be a step-by-step tutorial. .wide .content p { font-size:20px; } I love 3D stuff and I'm always trying out interesting ways to add depth to my projects. In this article I'll talk about how the CubeDial below was made, the concepts surrounding its underlying mechanism and how some of the solutions I employ overcome some common issues. Ok, so let's get going. Explore the CubeDial demo In the demo below, spin the dial. Notice that spinning the dial spins the cube. You can also swipe the cube and the dial will spin. Both the cube and the dial spin using momentum-based physics. If you are really clever, you may notice that the cube isn't really a cube, as it has 6 front-facing sides. See the Pen Gannon - Cube / Dial by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. What's it using under the hood? The core functionality is handled by the GreenSock Animation Platform (GSAP). I always load TweenMax because it includes all the things I need in one script load: TweenLite, CSSPlugin, EasePack, timeline sequencing tools, etc. I use TweenMax all over the place not only to immediately set CSS properties (using TweenMax.set() but also to delay the setting of them, to tween them, and to trigger events not only when they start or stop but crucially whilst they're animating too. Next up is Draggable - a very useful and flexible utility that I use in practically all of my projects now as most UIs need something dragged or moved. Finally we add in ThrowPropsPlugin (and couple it up to Draggable) for that flick/throw/physics/inertia that we have all become so used to on our mobile devices. So the three main GreenSock tools I will be using are: Draggable, TweenMax and ThrowPropsPlugin. The Cube's Structure A lot of you reading this will be visually led developers so below is a diagram of what's going on with the cube (ok it's a hexahedron I think as it has 6 sides). Each face of the 3D object is a <div> with a background image. Each <div> has its Z transformOrigin point set a fair bit away from the actual face (behind it) so that when its rotationY is animated it pivots left to right in perspective. This diagram illustrates the 6 faces - their transformOrigin X and Y are simply set to the middle of the faces (50% 50%) but the crucial part is the transformOrigin Z position which is -200px. In the actual code I dynamically work out what that distance should be based on the number of faces but to keep the diagram simple, I use -200px. The dotted center is that value (-200px) and once that's set each face will appear to swing around a point 200px behind itself when you tween its rotationY. By spinning each face around the same point, we achieve the illusion of the entire cube spinning around its center. To programmatically figure out the rotational offset of each face I use this equation: rotationY: (360/numFaces) * i; What wizardry is used to make a 6-sided object look like a cube? There's a simple answer to this and to demonstrate what's going on I have coded it so that all the faces become slightly transparent when you drag the cube. Try dragging and then holding it halfway through a drag - you'll see the other faces are distorted behind (see sceenshot on left). That's because the transformPerspective on each face is set fairly low (meaning exaggerated) in order to 'bend' the other faces behind. I've also added a slider to help illustrate this in the demo at the top of the page. As you drag the slider, the faces' transformPerspective is set higher and higher to the point where if the slider is fully to the right the perspective is so flat that the cube looks more like an infinite slide show. Try dragging it halfway then spinning the dial or the cube. Creating the dial In simple terms, the dial is just a png with some divs with some numbers in them. I do a little loop based on the number of sides in the cube to generate those divs and position them over the dial image. To make the dial "spin-able" literally takes one line of code using GSAP's Draggable. myDialDraggable = Draggable.create(dial, { type:'rotation', throwProps:true // for momentum-based animation }) That's really all you need to spin something. Amazing. However, the dial I use for this project is a little more advanced. I've isolated some of the dial's code in the demo below. Take note of how the numbers stay vertically oriented as the dial spins. Spin the dial See the Pen Gannon - Dial Only by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Using this method keeps everything in sync and it allows for multiple UI inputs - the null object is always controlled by user interaction and its X position is used to determine the rotation value of the dial (if the cube is dragged) and rotationY value(s) of the faces (if the dial is dragged). You can also use it to work out which face is at the front and because Draggable has the brilliant snap function you can ensure that when you release your drag/throw on either the 3D element or the dial it will always animate the null (and consequently all dependent objects) to a position where a face is flat on. Once it's come to rest you can also fire an onComplete event and have something happen - you might want the active/front face to load an iframe or animate its content. Or maybe you'd like a sound to play or you might want to perform a calculation based on the X position of null. Examples of using onComplete to trigger an animation when the spin is complete can be seen in demos for EdgeRotater and EdgeDial. Interacting with the 3D cube Unlike the simplified 2D demo above, grabbing and throwing the cube is a little more involved. The secret here is that you aren't directly touching the cube at all. In fact it would be literally impossible to effectively drag the cube by a face as the face would eventually disappear in to the distance of 3D space and overlap with other faces. It would be extremely difficult to assess which face receives the touch / mouse input for dragging. To solve this issue a Draggable instance is created that has the null object as its target and uses the <div> that contains the faces of the cube as its trigger. In simple terms this means that any time you click and drag on the div containing the cube it controls the x position of the null object, which in turn sets the rotation of each face of the cube and the rotation of the dial. Its sort of like interacting with a touch screen. There is a piece of glass between you and the UI elements you tap. Where you tap on the screen dictates which UI elements respond to your input. In the CubeDial, the div that contains the cube is like the glass screen of your phone. As you move your finger over the container, the app tracks your motion and applies the new values to the null object. Wrap up Ok that's enough of the complexities - it's hopefully not that complicated when you play around with it and adjust some values and see how things react. And if you're not already familiar with this kind of mechanism, once you've got your head around it you'll probably find you use it everywhere as it can be applied in pretty much all of your interactive projects. So that's all for now - I hope you found some (if not all) of this article interesting and/or informative. Admittedly it introduces the concept of null objects using a fairly complex example but it really doesn't have to be complex (or 3D). The 2D null object demo above might be a great place to start if all of this is pretty new to you as it uses a null object at its most basic level. Dive into the entire source code of the CubeDial Demo. My first draft of this article was peppered with gushing compliments regarding GSAP and I was told to tone it down a bit and maybe leave them until the end. So here it is (it's toned down a bit because I'm quite an excitable person!). GSAP rocks my world and the world of all my clients. If you aren't using it yet you are potentially missing out on one of the best (if not the best) animation platforms for JavaScript/CSS3. Its flexibility, ease of use and performance is light years ahead of anything else and if you're not using it and are curious then I heartily recommend you dive in and see for yourself. Jack has created amazing tools for designers and developers like us and Carl does an extraordinary job of explaining how they work in a simple, relevant and, most importantly, usable way. Happy tweening!
  10. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. There are some interesting (and surprising) performance implications of using CSS animations that aren't widely known. I stumbled across a few of them while running tests for a customer in the advertising industry who is pushing to have GSAP adopted as the standard, so I recorded a screencast explaining what I found. I figured it was worth sharing: Summary Timeline recordings in Chrome Dev Tools don't show the overhead involved with CSS animation of transforms, so people often misinterpret the [lack of] data. Recordings look "clean" with CSS and "dirty" with JS which leads to faulty conclusions about performance. CSS animations of transforms used twice as much CPU compared to JS according to Chrome's task manager. CSS animations caused the main thread to bog down more than using JavaScript animations. User interaction is typically handled on the main thread, making things feel sluggish to the user. It is especially costly if you animate transforms along with almost any other property at the same time. Webkit browsers have synchronization problems. JavaScript was faster than CSS animations on every device that I ran this test on – the only exception was animating transforms in Webkit browsers (and then there's that heavy cost on the main thread and sync problems). In order to independently control the timing/easing of transform components (rotation, scale, skew, position) in CSS, you must create a DOM node for each which negatively impacts performance. With JavaScript, no such workarounds are necessary. (see note below) I love Dev Tools - I'm not knocking it at all. These things are just tough to measure. Do your own tests! Don't put too much faith in Dev Tools or my tests. Use your eyes because ultimately perception is what matters to end users. Smooth movement and responsive UI are both important. Links Raw Codepen test Google's Paul Lewis addresses CSS vs. JS Animations A great article about hardware accelerated CSS by Ariya Hidayat Why GSAP? - a practical developer's guide UPDATE: After recording the video, I did some more tests that showed that one of the biggest contributors to the slowdowns in the pure CSS version was the fact that multiple elements had to be nested in order to accomplish the independent transform component controls. In other words, staggering the start/end times (or easing) of rotation, scale, and position is practically impossible in pure CSS unless you nest things like that, but there's a relatively significant performance tradeoff. When nesting could be avoided, pure CSS animation of only transforms did appear smoother on webkit browsers under heavy pressure and it was basically indistinguishable from optimized JS animations under all other levels of pressure.
  11. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. We're excited to announce enhanced SVG support baked right into GSAP's CSSPlugin. Now you can animate the rotation, scale, skew, position (and even change the transform origin) of SVG elements just like normal DOM elements. The chart below illustrates a number of cross-browser bugs related to CSS transforms on SVG elements. Four modern browsers interpret the same basic animation code in drastically different ways. Browser comparison (without GSAP) See the Pen GIFS: SVG + CSS Transform Problems by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Be sure to test the demo above in IE, Opera, FireFox, Safari and Chrome to see equal results. Find out how it all works In order to help a wider audience understand how to get around the obstacles of working with SVG, Jack wrote an article packed with tons of info, animation demos and a video showing all the juicy details on www.css-tricks.com. We're honored that Chris Coyier allowed us to share these enhancements and time-saving techniques with the wider developer community on his highly-respected blog. Get all the juicy details in: SVG Animation and CSS Transforms: A Complicated Love Story. The techniques discussed will surely transform your SVG animation workflow
  12. No need to worry. Tweens and timelines are automatically made eligible for garbage collection (gc) when appropriate (typically when they finish but if you maintain a reference to an instance so that you can restart it later, for example, it won’t be gc’d out from under you). Basically the system manages gc for you and generally cleans up after itself.
  13. CSS3 transitions have some significant limitations that make them unworkable for a serious animation platform. They don’t provide precise controls over the timing or easing. They’re great for simple effects but the GreenSock Animation Platform delivers extremely precise rendering, so you can do things like pause() and reverse() an animation anytime or skip to a specific time and play from there, etc. Try creating a CSS3 transition that uses an elastic.out or slow motion ease and then jump to 0.72494-seconds into a 2-second transition and pause() only to resume() later. It’s impossible from what I understand. So no, the platform doesn’t make use of CSS3 transitions. However, it is highly optimized for performance. See the detailed cage match where GSAP battles CSS3 transitions where there’s a detailed comparison in several categories.
  14. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. A post by Carl Schooff, GreenSock's "Geek Ambassador" Hot on the heels of the CSS Myth-Busting article, I'm going to take a deeper look into CSS Animations and how they fit (or don't fit) into a modern animator's workflow. This isn't about simple fades or basic transitions (CSS is great for those); Developers who use animation to tell a story or deliver rich interactivity require a very different workflow than those who are simply doing UI transitions. I'm going to show you exactly where some of the pain points are for a typical project and how they can bring your workflow to a grinding halt. Even relatively simple animations like the one below can become surprisingly cumbersome with CSS. Example of a Simple, "Story-Telling" Animation See the Pen GSAP: Full Version Complete by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Seriously, You guys are beating up on CSS Animations again? Really, I'm not trying to be negative for the sake of being negative. It's just that so many developers are looking for animation tools that accommodate their real-world projects and the industry seems to scream "use CSS!" even though the API doesn't adequately serve the workflow of modern animators who are building immersive experiences or animations that "tell a story". Too many people are being led down a path that results in utter frustration, or at least a lot of wasted time. And no, CSS Animations aren't "evil". In fact, sometimes they're perfectly appropriate (see the CSS Myth-Busting article for details). There are CSS fans who craft animations and proudly shout "Pure CSS! No JS!" as if the grueling effort necessary is a badge of honor. The accomplishment is indeed admirable, and we tip our hats to them. But WOW it's a lot of work and doesn't exactly lend itself to experimentation or easy edits. Quite simply, we aim to change the tide with tools like GSAP. The majority of the GSAP API has been shaped by feedback from real developers in the trenches over the course of many years. The process of animation should be fun and inspiring. Challenge! Still not convinced that GSAP is better suited for professional animators? I'm very interested to see how this animation can be built more effectively. Are you in the CSS-Purist camp? Do you prefer to trigger animations with JavaScript setTimeouts? Maybe you have another library that blows GSAP away. Dig in and build the animation I've been using with your own choice of tools. Below are some resources that should make it easy to get started. When you're done, just drop us a line in the comments or in the forums. Full storyboard showing css values for each key frame: http://codepen.io/GreenSock/pen/DzHBs Starter Pen: http://codepen.io/GreenSock/pen/EsAvF Recommended reading: Myth Busting: CSS Animations vs JavaScript (css-tricks.com guest post) Main GSAP page Jump Start: GSAP JS Cage matches: CSS3 transitions vs GSAP | jQuery vs GSAP 3D Transforms & More CSS3 Goodies Arrive in GSAP JS
  15. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. With the release of iOS 7, I was anticipating some big leaps forward in browser performance. What I found was quite surprising. Is anyone else experiencing the same thing? Here's a quick [and very casual] video showing what I discovered: A lot of people in the industry talk about the benefits of using CSS transitions because they're so much faster, especially with transforms (scale/translate/rotate) on mobile devices. What happened? Why is Zepto (which uses CSS transitions) so much slower? GSAP's performance remains solid in iOS 7 (far better than jQuery and other libraries), but CSS transitions fall flat on their face (at least with transforms). Can anyone shed some light on what's happening? Are you seeing the same results in iOS 7? Also, is anyone else seeing worse performance when altering the scrollTop or scrollLeft of DOM elements? Useful links Speed test Draggable Demo CSS Transitions/Animations vs. GSAP Cage Match jQuery vs. GSAP Cage Match Why GSAP? A practical guide for developers UPDATE: Apple reached out to us and acknowledged the apparent bug and said they're working on a fix. (Thanks Apple)
  16. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Making a DOM element draggable isn't terribly difficult - there are jQuery plugins and even some native HTML5 capabilities in newer browsers. But generic dragging is kinda boring. What about smooth, natural momentum-based continuation after the user releases the mouse (or touch on mobile devices)? What about imposing bounds and edge resistance and silky-smooth redirection to certain landing values that you provide? Or flick/drag scrolling with bounce-back that doesn't look awkward? Or instead of dragging to change the position of an element, what if you want to spin it? Maybe you even want to track the momentum and let it come to rest naturally or rig it to glide to a stop at a certain value, Wheel-of-Fortune style? Yeah, that's a lot more complex. In fact, it can be a real drag to build (sorry, the pun was irresistible). Draggable makes it remarkably simple. More importantly, it delivers a very fluid user experience on both mobile devices and desktop browsers. Instead of explaining what makes Draggable so special, we built an interactive demo that showcases some of its talents. There are even code samples that update as you change the options. Go play around and have some fun. View Demo
  17. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. This video walks you through some common problems that professional animators face every day and shows you how GSAP’s TimelineLite tackles these challenges with ease. Although GSAP is very powerful and flexible, the API is beginner-friendly. In no time you will be creating TimelineLite animations that can bend and adapt to the needs of the most demanding clients and art directors. Watch the video and ask yourself, "Can my current animation toolset do this?" Enjoy. Video Highlights Tweens in a TimelineLite naturally play one-after-the-other (the default insertion point is at the end of the timeline). No need to specify or update the delay of each tween every time the slightest timing changes are made. Tweens in a TimelineLite don't need to play in direct sequence; you can overlap them or easily add gaps. Multiple tweens can all start at the same time or slightly staggered. Easily to rearrange the order in which tweens play. Jump to any point of the timeline to finesse a particular animation. No need to watch the whole animation each time. Add labels anywhere in the timeline to mark where other tweens should be added, or use them for navigation. Control the speed of the timeline with timeScale(). Full control over every aspect of playback: play, pause, reverse, resume, jump to any label or time, and much more. Unlike jQuery.animate() or other JS libraries that allow you to chain together multiple animations on a particular object, GSAP’s TimelineLite lets you sequence multiple tweens on multiple objects. It's a radically different and more practical approach that allows for precise synchronization and flexibility. If you are still considering CSS3 animations or transitions for robust animation after watching this video, please watch it again Check out this Pen! If you are wondering what "autoAlpha" refers to in the code above, its a convenience feature of CSSPlugin that intelligently handles "opacity" and "visibility" combined. Recommended reading: Main GSAP JS page Jump Start: GSAP JS Speed comparison Cage matches: CSS3 transitions vs GSAP | jQuery vs GSAP jQuery.animate() with GSAP: get the jquery.gsap.js plugin! 3D Transforms & More CSS3 Goodies Arrive in GSAP JS
  18. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. New DirectionalRotationPlugin Have you ever tweened rotation to a particular value but wished that you could control which direction it traveled (clockwise or counter-clockwise)? For example, if the current rotation is 170 and you tween to -170, normally that would travel counter-clockwise -340 degrees but what if you prefer rotating 20 degrees clockwise instead? Or maybe you just want it to go in the shortest direction to that new position (20 degrees in this case). This is all possible now with the DirectionalRotationPlugin. Previously, shortRotation was available in CSSPlugin, but there were three shortcomings (pardon the pun): It always went in the shortest direction - it wasn't possible to define a particular direction (clockwise or counter-clockwise). It required using a different property name ("shortRotation" or "shortRotationX" or "shortRotationY") instead of the regular property name ("rotation" or "rotationX" or "rotationY"). It only worked on DOM elements. What if you have a generic object or an EaselJS Shape (or whatever)? The new DirectionalRotationPlugin solves all of these issues. First of all, its functionality is baked into CSSPlugin, so you don't even need to load the DirectionalRotationPlugin if you're only animating DOM elements. The plugin is also included in TweenMax, so there's no need to load a separate plugin there either. Use the new syntax to get the desired behavior - add one of the following suffixes to the value: "_cw" for clockwise, "_ccw" for counter-clockwise, and "_short" to go whichever direction is shortest. Here are some examples: //tweens to the 270 position in a counter-clockwise direction (notice the value is in quotes) TweenMax.to(element, 1, {rotation:"270_ccw"}); //tweens to the -45 position in a clockwise direction TweenMax.to(element, 1, {rotation:"-45_cw"}); //tweens 1.5 radians more than the current rotationX value, and travels in the shortest direction TweenMax.to(element, 1, {rotationX:"+=1.5rad_short"}); If you're tweening a more generic object (anything that's not a DOM element), you can use the DirectionalRotationPlugin. If you pass in a simple value, it will assume you're attempting to tween the target's "rotation" property but you can tween ANY rotational properties of any name by passing in an object with the appropriate properties. Here are some examples: //start with a generic object with various rotation values var obj = {rotation:45, rotationX:0, rotationY:110}; //tweens rotation to 270 in a clockwise direction TweenLite.to(obj, 1, {directionalRotation:"270_cw"}); //tweens rotationX to -45 in a counter-clockwise direction and rotationY to 200 in a clockwise direction: TweenLite.to(obj, 1, {directionalRotation:{rotationX:"-45_ccw", rotationY:"200_cw"}}); As of 1.9.0, shortRotation is deprecated in favor of this new (more flexible and concise) syntax. New AttrPlugin This plugin allows you to tween any numeric attribute of a DOM element. For example, let's say your DOM element looks like this: <rect id="rect" fill="none" x="0" y="0" width="500" height="400"></rect> You could tween the "x", "y", "width", or "height" attributes using AttrPlugin like this: //tuck any attributes you want to tween into an attr:{} object TweenMax.to("#rect", 1, {attr:{x:100, y:50, width:100, height:100}, ease:Linear.easeNone}); You can tween an unlimited number of attributes simultaneously. Just use the associated property name inside the attr:{} object. The AttrPlugin is included inside the TweenMax JS file, so you don't need to load the plugin separately if you're using TweenMax. New TextPlugin This plugin allows you to tween the text content of a DOM element, replacing it one character at a time (or one word at a time if you set the delimiter to " " (a space) or you can even use a custom delimiter). So when the tween is finished, the DOM element's text has been completely replaced. This also means that if you rewind/restart the tween, the text will be reverted to what it was originally. Here is a simple example of replacing the text in yourElement: //replaces yourElement's text with "This is the new text" over the course of 2 seconds TweenMax.to(yourElement, 2, {text:"This is the new text", ease:Linear.easeNone}); If you'd like to use a different delimiter so that instead of replacing character-by-character, it gets replaced word-by-word, just pass an object with configuration properties like this: //replaces word-by-word because the delimiter is " " (a space) TweenMax.to(yourElement, 2, {text:{value:"This is the new text", delimiter:" "}, ease:Linear.easeNone}); Sometimes it's useful to have the new text differentiated visually from the old text, so TextPlugin allows you to assign a css class to the new and/or old content, like this: //wraps the old text in <span class="class1"></span> and the new text in a <span class="class2"></span> TweenLite.to(yourElement, 2, {text:{value:"This is the new text", newClass:"class2", oldClass:"class1"}, ease:Power2.easeIn}); As indicated, defining a newClass and/or oldClass will result in wrapping a <span> tag around the associated text. The TextPlugin is NOT included inside TweenMax, so you'll need to load it separately. Other updates and enhancements in 1.9.0: Added support for hsl() and hsla() colors in CSSPlugin and ColorPropsPlugin Implemented a new (more concise and clear) way to register plugins. Old plugins will still work fine, but most of the new ones in 1.9.0 use the new style of registering which won't work with old versions of TweenLite/TweenMax. Please just make sure all your files are updated. Fixed issue that caused className to be ignored by the autoCSS feature that creates the css:{} wrapper internally. Fixed issue that could cause em not to be translated to px accurately, causing a jump when the start and end units for the tween don't match (like px to em or visa-versa) Fixed backfaceVisibility so that it is properly prefixed when necessary Now setting "float" on a DOM element will work across browsers including Firefox and IE. Worked around issue that caused x/y/z transforms not to work properly if they exceeded 21,474 (or -21,474). Fixed issue that caused values not to be interpreted correctly if a negative number had a relative prefix, like "+=-50px" or "-=-50px" Fixed issue in EaselPlugin that prevented ColorMatrixFilter tweens from working correctly when the starting matrix wasn't an identity matrix Now fromTo() and staggerFromTo() methods have immediateRender set to true by default, just like from() and staggerFrom() always did. This seems like the preferred behavior for most developers, but you can certainly set immediateRender:false on any tween if you prefer that behavior. Now fromTo() and staggerFromTo() tweens that have immediateRender:false will record their pre-tween values (before even implementing the "from" part of the tween) so that if their parent timeline rewinds past the beginning of the tween, it restores values to their originals. Get it now Download the latest version of GSAP using the fancy new download screen, and notice that everything is also available as CDN links as well. The docs have been updated to reflect all these changes. Questions? Swing by the forums to get your questions answered.
  19. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Update: don't miss our guest post on css-tricks.com, Myth Busting: CSS Animations vs. JavaScript which provides some additional data, visual examples, and a speed test focused on this topic. Ever since CSS3 "transitions" and "animations" were introduced, they have been widely lauded as the future of animation on the web. It often seems like all the "cool kids" are talking about them. Should you jump on the bandwagon? Is JavaScript animation headed for extinction? How does the new GreenSock Animation Platform (GSAP) fare when it steps into the ring and faces off against the hyped-up tag-team of CSS3 transitions & animations? Does GSAP have the chops to hold its own? Let's find out. Ready...FIGHT! Performance One of the most common arguments in favor of CSS3 animations has been that they're hardware accelerated, thus outperform any JavaScript-based equivalent. The theory is that if you define your transitions/animations directly in css, the browser can worry about all the calculations behind the scenes and tap into hardware and native code to execute them. Sounds awesome. Unfortunately it's not quite that clean. Only certain properties are hardware-accelerated (like 3D transforms and opacity - mostly ones that don't affect document flow) and different browsers handle things differently. Plus every comparison we saw on the web pitted CSS3 transitions against jQuery, but GSAP is up to 20 times faster than jQuery. In our real-world tests, we saw drastic differences in performance among the various browsers and when tested head-to-head against GSAP, CSS3 animations were usually slower! Weird. As expected, however, 3D transforms were indeed faster under heavy stress although in most situations you'd never notice a difference. GSAP is extremely optimized. UPDATE (2015-01-05): There are some interesting (and surprising) performance implications of using CSS animations that aren't widely known. Here's a screencast that shows how Dev Tools doesn't report the overhead involved with CSS animations, some synchronization problems, and how they can drag down the main thread performance more than JS. To see a simple comparison for yourself, select the "Zepto" engine in the speed comparison because it uses CSS3 transitions for its animations, and then compare it to GSAP. Beware that the fps (frames per second) counter in the lower right corner isn't always accurate in some browsers (like recent versions of Safari) when using CSS3 transitions because requestAnimationFrame events [incorrectly] get dispatched even when the screen is clearly not being updated. So the animation may actually be running at a very jerky 10fps, yet 50+ requestAnimationFrame cycles are being triggered by the browser! This exposes another flaw in CSS3 transitions - there's no way to know when updates truly occur. There's only a "complete" event fired at the end of the transition/animation. If anyone knows how to get a more accurate fps counter in Safari while using CSS3 transitions, please let us know. Another performance issue to note in the speed comparison is the clumping that occurs with many engines (including Zepto) under heavy stress, where the stars begin pulsing out in rings instead of a nicely dispersed field. Even though GSAP was faster than CSS3 transitions in the majority of our real-world tests, it's still true that 3D transforms and opacity tweens are faster with CSS3 transitions and it's possible that browsers will be able to further tap into hardware acceleration in the future, so we'll call this round a tie. Feel free to build your own tests to see how things compare in your workflow. Performance winner: TIE Controls This is one of the major weak spots for CSS transitions (its "glass jaw" of sorts). Let's say you invest the time in writing a bunch of css for a whiz-bang animation and then you need to control the whole thing - good luck with that. It is virtually impossible. GSAP's object oriented architecture allows you to pause, resume, reverse, restart, or seek to any spot in any tween. Even adjust timeScale on the fly for slow motion or fastforward effects. Place tweens in a timeline with precise scheduling (including overlaps or gaps) and then control the whole thing just like it's a single tween. All of the easing and effects remain perfectly intact as you reverse, adjust timeScale, etc. (with CSS transitions, easing flip-flops upon reverse). You can even kill individual portions of a tween anytime (like if a tween is controlling both "top" and "left" properties, you can kill "left" while "top" continues). Put labels in a timeline to mark important spots and seek() to them anytime. Imagine trying to build the example below using CSS transitions. It would be virtually impossible. With GSAP, it's easy. In fact, all of the animation is done with 2 lines of code. Drag the scrubber, click the buttons below, and see how easy it is to control the sequenced animation. Controls winner: GSAP Tweenable Properties Both competitors can animate transforms (2D and 3D), colors, borderRadius, boxShadow, and pretty much every important property, but there's one key shortcoming of CSS - you cannot animate individual transforms distinctly! For example, try rotating an object and then halfway through that animation, start scaling it with a different ease and finish at a different time. Since all transforms (scaleX, scaleY, rotation, rotationX, rotationY, skewX, skewY, x, y, and z) are all mashed into one "transform" property, it's virtually impossible to handle them distinctly. GSAP not only works around this limitation, but it also allows you to do advanced things like animate along Bezier paths or do momentum-based motion (with ThrowPropsPlugin) or relative tweens or animate the scroll position or do directional rotation or physics-based motion, etc. Plus GSAP can animate any numeric property of any object, not just DOM elements. Do you really want to use one toolset (CSS) for animating DOM elements and then have to switch to a completely different toolset and syntax when you do canvas-based animation? GSAP handles both consistently. CSS transitions and animations just can't compete here. Tweenable properties winner: GSAP Workflow When you're creating fun and interesting animations, workflow is critical. You need to be able to quickly build sequences, stagger start times, overlap tweens, experiment with eases, leverage various callbacks and labels, and create concise code. It would be great to modularize your code by creating functions that each spit back an animation object (tween or timeline) which can be inserted into another timeline at a precise time. You need a flexible, powerful system that lets you experiment without wasting hours. GSAP wipes the floor with CSS transitions in this round. Anyone who has attempted an ambitious project with CSS3 transitions/animations will attest to the fact that they tend to get very cumbersome and verbose. Experimenting with timing and fine-tuning details can get extremely tedious especially when dealing with all the browser prefixes. GSAP CSS3 transitions = supported = unsupported Flexible object-oriented architecture that allows animations to be nested inside other animations as deeply as you want Supported Unsupported Concise code that doesn't require vendor prefixes Supported Unsupported Create sequences (even with overlapping animations) that auto-adjust as you insert/remove/change intermediate pieces of animation (makes experimenting MUCH easier) Supported Unsupported Accommodate virtually any ease including Bounce, Elastic, SlowMo, RoughEase, SteppedEase, etc. Supported Unsupported Animate things into place (backwards) with convenience methods like from() and staggerFrom() Supported Unsupported Callbacks for when an animation starts, updates, completes, repeats, and finishes reversing, plus optionally pass any number of parameters to those callbacks Supported Unsupported Place labels at specific times in a sequence so that you can seek() there (and/or insert animations there) Supported Unsupported Animate any numeric property of any JavaScript object, not just DOM elements (great for canvas-based animation). Supported Unsupported Workflow winner: GSAP Compatibility CSS transitions simply don't work in older browsers, even Internet Explorer 9. GSAP works in all browsers (although some particular features may be disabled, like 3D transforms in IE8). Once again, this round was no contest. GSAP can even do 2D transforms like rotation, scaleX, scaleY, x, y, skewX, and skewY all the way back to IE6 including transformOrigin functionality! Plus it works around scores of other browser issues so that you can focus on the important stuff. Safari's 3D transformOrigin bug? No problem. Firefox's flashing 3D elements bug? No worries. Inconsistency in IE's backgroundPosition values? GSAP has you covered. Vendor prefixes? Nah, GSAP adds 'em for you when necessary. Compatibility winner: GSAP Popularity CSS3 transitions have been talked about (and used) for years all over the web whereas GSAP is relatively new. It can't match CSS3 transitions' popularity. As clients start pushing for more aggressive animations and HTML5 games proliferate and operating systems become very JavaScript-friendly, the balance may very well shift quickly. For now, though, this round goes squarely to CSS transitions. Popularity winner: CSS3 transitions Conflict management What happens if a particular set of properties (like "left" and "top") are animating and then you need to redirect one of those to a different value (like "left" to 100px instead of 300px) using a different ease and duration? With CSS transitions, it's a very complex process. With GSAP, it's simple and automatic. In fact, there are several overwrite modes you can choose from. Conflict management winner: GSAP Support There are numerous places on the web where you can ask the community your CSS transitions-related questions, but GSAP has dedicated support forums where there's rarely a question that remains unanswered for more than 24 hours. GreenSock's forums are manned by paid staff (including the author of the platform), so you're quite likely to get solid answers there. Add to that the fact that GreenSock has a track record of being much more agile in terms of squashing bugs and releasing updates than browsers do for CSS3 transitions, so GSAP gets the upper hand here. Support winner: GSAP Expandability GSAP employs a plugin architecture, making it relatively easy to add features and custom animation properties but CSS transitions have no such equivalent. You're stuck with what the browsers decide to offer. In addition to CSSPlugin, GSAP already has plugins like ScrollToPlugin for scrolling to specific window or div scroll positions, BezierPlugin for animating along Bezier curves, ThrowPropsPlugin for momentum-based motion, and RaphaelPlugin, EaselPlugin, and KineticPlugin for those libraries (Raphael, EaselJS, and KineticJS). Plus there are physics-based plugins like Phyics2DPlugin and PhysicsPropsPlugin as well as a fun ScrambleTextPlugin for Club GreenSock members. More plugins are on their way, and you can create your own too. Expandability winner: GSAP Learning resources Again, the popularity of CSS3 transitions trumps anything GSAP could throw at it right now. There are lots of tutorials, videos, and articles about CSS3 transitions whereas GSAP is new to the game. GreenSock is being aggressive about putting together solid resources (like the Jump Start tour) and the community is crankin' out some great articles and videos too, but CSS3 transitions score the win in this round. Learning resources winner: CSS3 TRANSITIONS Price & license Both CSS3 transitions and GSAP are completely free for almost every type of usage. GSAP allows you to edit the raw source code to fix bugs (if that's something you need to do), but there's no way to edit the source code that drives CSS3 transitions. Then again, there's no special license required to use them either. If you plan to use GSAP in a product/app/site/game for which a fee is collected from multiple customers, you need the commercial license that comes with "Business Green" Club GreenSock memberships (one-off commercial projects don't require the special license). It's actually a more business-friendly license in many ways than a typical open source license that offers no warranties or backing of any kind or imposes code sharing or credit requirements. GreenSock's licensing model provides a small funding mechanism that benefits the entire user base because it empowers continued innovation and support, keeping it free for the vast majority of users. See the licensing page for details. Although there are some clear benefits of GreenSock's model, we'll give this round to CSS3 transitions because using them is technically "free" in more scenarios than GSAP. Price & license winner: CSS3 TRANSITIONS File size This is a tricky round indeed because GSAP requires inclusion of at least 1 JavaScript file whereas CSS3 transitions leverage native code in the browser, but the code you'd have to write to accomplish the same thing in CSS3 animations or transitions is often far more verbose, offsetting the kb savings. For example, let's take a relatively simple sequenced animation (see codepen or jsfiddle? GSAP code: var tl = new TimelineLite(); tl.staggerFrom('.box', 0.5, {opacity:0, scale:0, rotation:-180}, 0.3) .staggerTo('.box', 0.3, {scale:0.8}, 0.3, 0.7); This type of thing is impossible with CSS3 transitions, but it can be done with CSS3 animations as long as we give each element its own class name or ID. Let's take a look at the CSS code (see codepen or jsfiddle? Equivalent CSS3 Animation: .animated { -webkit-animation-fill-mode: both; -moz-animation-fill-mode: both; animation-fill-mode: both; -webkit-animation-duration: 1s; -moz-animation-duration: 1s; animation-duration: 1s; } @-webkit-keyframes introAnimation { 0% { -webkit-transform: scale(0) rotate(-180deg) ; opacity: 0; } 50% { -webkit-transform: scale(1) rotate(0deg) ; opacity: 1; } 70% { -webkit-transform: scale(1) rotate(0deg); } 100% { -webkit-transform: scale(0.8) rotate(0deg); } } @-moz-keyframes introAnimation { 0% { -moz-transform: scale(0) rotate(-180deg); opacity: 0; } 50% { -moz-transform: scale(1) rotate(0deg); opacity: 1; } 70%{ -moz-transform: scale(1) rotate(0deg); } 100% { -moz-transform: scale(0.8) rotate(0deg); } } @keyframes introAnimation { 00% { transform: scale(0) rotate(-180deg); opacity: 0; } 50% { transform: scale(1) rotate(0deg); opacity: 1; } 70%{ transform: scale(1) rotate(0deg); } 100% { transform: scale(0.8) rotate(0deg); } } .introAnimation { -webkit-backface-visibility: visible !important; -webkit-animation-name: introAnimation; -moz-backface-visibility: visible !important; -moz-animation-name: introAnimation; backface-visibility: visible !important; animation-name: introAnimation; } .two { -webkit-animation-delay: 0.3s; -moz-animation-delay: 0.3s; animation-delay: 0.3s; } .three { -webkit-animation-delay: 0.6s; -moz-animation-delay: 0.6s; animation-delay: 0.6s; } .four { -webkit-animation-delay: 0.9s; -moz-animation-delay: 0.9s; animation-delay: 0.9s; } .five { -webkit-animation-delay: 1.2s; -moz-animation-delay: 1.2s; animation-delay: 1.2s; } .six { -webkit-animation-delay: 1.5s; -moz-animation-delay: 1.5s; animation-delay: 1.5s; } .seven { -webkit-animation-delay: 1.8s; -moz-animation-delay: 1.8s; animation-delay: 1.8s; } .eight { -webkit-animation-delay: 2.1s; -moz-animation-delay: 2.1s; animation-delay: 2.1s; } .nine { -webkit-animation-delay: 2.4s; -moz-animation-delay: 2.4s; animation-delay: 2.4s; } As you can see, the CSS3 code is more than 10 times longer! And what if you want to have the entire sequence repeat 3 times? Good luck with that in CSS - you can set an animation-iteration-count but it only applies to each individual element, so it doesn't give us the effect we're after. And what if you want to experiment with the easing or offsets/delays or rotational values? It is quite cumbersome to say the least, even if you use sass or something like that. With GSAP, it's simple. If you only need very simple animations/transitions, CSS3 would deliver smaller file sizes, but once you start getting more aggressive and expressive with your animations, the scales shift quickly and GSAP becomes more economical. The other thing to keep in mind is that GSAP's JS file(s) are typically cached by the browser, so the savings page-to-page is much larger since the code you write on each page is far more concise. In other words, think of how much js/css the browser must actually request from the server over the course of your users' multi-page visit to your site. File size winner: TIE Flexibility Let's face it: basic tweening is pretty straightforward for any system, but it's really the details and advanced features that make a robust platform shine. GSAP crushes CSS3 transitions and animations when it comes to delivering a refined, professional-grade tool set that's truly flexible. Here are just a few of the conveniences baked into GSAP: Tween any numeric property of any object. Optionally round values to the nearest integer to make sure they're always landing on whole pixels/values. Animate along Bezier curves, even rotating along with the path or plotting a smoothly curved Bezier through a set of points you provide (including 3D!). GSAP's Bezier system is super flexible in that it's not just for x/y/z coordinates - it can handle ANY set of properties. Plus it will automatically adjust the movement so that it's correctly proportioned the entire way, avoiding a common problem that plagues Bezier animation systems. You can define Bezier data as Cubic or Quadratic or raw anchor points. Animate any color property of any JavaScript object (not just DOM elements). Define colors in any of the common formats like #F00 or #FF0000 or rgb(255,0,0) or rgba(255,0,0,1) or hsl(30, 50%, 80%) or hsla(30, 50%, 80%, 0.5) or "red". Set a custom fps (frames per second) for the entire engine (the default is 60fps). All tweens are perfectly synchronized (unlike many other tweening engines). Use the modern requestAnimationFrame API to drive refreshes or a standard setTimeout (the default is requestAnimationFrame with a fallback to setTimeout) Tons of easing options including proprietary SlowMo, RoughEase, and SteppedEase along with all the industry standards Animate css style sheet rules themselves with CSSRulePlugin Animate the rotation of an object in a specific direction (clockwise, counter-clockwise, or whichever is shortest) by appending "_cw", "_ccw", and "_short" to the value. You can tween getter/setter methods, not just properties. For example, myObject.getProp() and myObject.setProp() can be tweened like TweenLite.to(myObject, 1, {setProp:10}); and it will automatically recognize that it's a method and call getProp() to get the current value when the tween starts. Same for jQuery-style getters/setters that use a shared method like myObject.prop(). You can even tween another tween or timeline! For example, TweenLite.to(otherTween, 1, {timeScale:0.5}) would animate otherTween.timeScale to 0.5 over the course of 1 second. You can even scrub the virtual playhead of one tween/timeine with another tween by animating its "time". Flexibility winner: GSAP Conclusion Despite the hype surrounding CSS3 transitions and animations, they just aren't well-suited for professional-grade animation tasks. They did manage to win a few rounds in this match but ultimately GSAP man-handled them, sending them running from the ring like scared sissies. Of course we're slightly biased, but check out the facts for yourself. Kick the tires. Audition GSAP on your next project. See how it feels once you get past the initial learning curve. If you only need simple fades or very basic animation in modern browsers, CSS3 transitions are probably just fine. However, what happens when your client wants to do something more expressive? What if browser compatibility becomes an issue? Why not build on a solid foundation to begin with so that you don't find yourself having to rewrite all your animation code? If you want professional-grade scripted animation, look no further. To get started fast, check out our Jump Start tour. Recommended reading: Main GSAP JS page Why GSAP? A practical guide for developers Jump Start: GSAP JS jQuery vs GSAP: cage match 3D Transforms & More CSS3 Goodies Arrive in GSAP JS Speed comparison Explanation of CSS3 transitions, transforms and animations P.S. A rant about where animation logic belongs: We can't put this post to bed without mentioning a beef we've got with the whole concept of putting all your animation logic in css. Ever since the <blink> tag, there has been this tendency for browser vendors to offer developers these nifty "conveniences" that end up encouraging them to mix markup and/or style rules with behavioral logic. Is that really a good idea? One of the wonderful things about the modern web is that we've got this lovely separation between markup, presentation/styling, and behavioral logic (at least that's the goal). Should we be blurring the line like this? Isn't JavaScript the logic layer that should be handling state changes, application logic, reaction to user interaction (which often includes animation), etc.? Some may claim "But putting animation in css is great because that way if the user has JavaScript disabled, the animations still work!" Do you really think users of the modern web can turn off JavaScript and expect to browse the web with great results? Is that who you're targeting for a rich experience? And if they turned off JavaScript, might they have done so specifically to avoid annoying animations? Is it really helping to shift animation logic into css where they can't turn it off? In the web of yesteryear, animations were quite simplistic; fade this, slide that. Done. Anything more aggressive was relegated to a plugin like Flash which afforded incredible richness and complexity in terms of animation. But today, clients want that sort of expressiveness directly in the browser. It needs to work on mobile devices. It's no longer about simple fade-ins or sliding an image across the screen. CSS3 transitions fit the old mentality well, but not the new one. CSS3 animations technically provide more flexibility but they fall miserably short and they still force behavioral logic into the style layer. And to use them effectively, we still need JavaScript to at least swap classes and trigger things. From a development and debugging standpoint, when I apply a class to an element how would I know if that will trigger an animation or transition or neither? Should I have to keep bouncing back and forth between css and JS to manage behavioral logic related to animations? Maybe we're just ill-informed and there are some fantastic reasons for putting behavioral logic like animation into the css layer, but one thing seems pretty clear: the current way that developers have to build all but the simplest css animation leaves a LOT to be desired. The API is terribly limiting and clunky. Let's move the web forward. Let's make animation fun and flexible. Let's keep behavioral logic and style rules distinct. Let's leverage the incredible flexibility of JavaScript. If we've misrepresented anything here or if you want to weigh in with your opinion about where behavioral logic like animation belongs, feel free to post your comment below. If you're someone who has attempted an aggressive animation task with CSS3 transitions/animations as well as GSAP, we'd love to hear how you felt they compared.
  20. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Update: don't miss our guest post on css-tricks.com, Myth Busting: CSS Animations vs. JavaScript which provides some additional data, visual examples, and a speed test focused on this topic. jQuery is the 700-pound gorilla that has been driving lots of animation on the web for years, but let's see how it fares when it steps into the ring with the feisty GSAP (GreenSock Animation Platform) which gained its fame in the Flash world and is now flexing its greased-up muscles in JavaScript. Before we put the gloves on, we need to make it clear that we've got the utmost respect for jQuery, its authors, and its community of users (to which we belong). It's a fantastic tool that we highly recommend for non-animation tasks. This tongue-in-cheek "cage match" is solely focused on animation. Performance Performance is paramount, especially on mobile devices with sluggish processors. Silky smooth animation is the hallmark of any animation platform worth its weight. This round wasn't even close. GSAP was up to 20 TIMES faster than jQuery under heavy stress. See a speed comparison for yourself or make your own. Performance winner: GSAP Controls With jQuery, you can stop an animation but that's about it. Some 3rd party plugins add resume capability, but jQuery takes a pounding in this round. GSAP's object oriented architecture allows you to pause, resume, reverse, restart, or jump to any spot in any tween. Even adjust timeScale on the fly for slow motion or fastforward effects. Place tweens in a timeline with precise scheduling (including overlaps or gaps) and then control the whole thing just like it's a single tween. All of the easing and effects remain perfectly intact as you reverse, pause, adjust timeScale, etc. And you can even kill individual portions of a tween anytime (like if a tween is controlling both "top" and "left" properties, you can kill "left" while "top" continues). Put labels in a timeline to mark important spots and seek() to them anytime. Imagine trying to build the example below using jQuery. It would be virtually impossible. With GSAP, it's easy. In fact, all of the animation is done with 2 lines of code. Drag the slider, click the buttons below, and see how easy it is to control the sequenced animation. See the Pen Impossible with jQuery: controls (used in jquery cagematch) by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Controls winner: GSAP Tweenable Properties jQuery.animate() works with basic numeric properties, but that's about it. If you want to do more, you'll need to rely on lots of 3rd party plugins which may have spotty support or unresolved bugs. GSAP's CSSPlugin handles almost anything you throw at it while protecting you from various browser bugs and prefix requirements. GSAP jQuery  = supported    = supported with 3rd party plugins    = partially supported with 3rd party plugins Basic numeric css properties like left, top, opacity, fontSize, etc. Supported Supported Colors like backgroundColor, borderColor, etc. Supported Supported with 3rd party plugins backgroundPosition Supported Supported with 3rd party plugins boxShadow Supported Supported with 3rd party plugins clip Supported Supported with 3rd party plugins textShadow (including multiple text shadows) Supported Partially supported with 3rd party plugins 2D transforms like rotation, scaleX, scaleY, x, y, skewX, and skewY, including 2D transformOrigin and directional rotation functionality Supported Partially supported with 3rd party plugins 3D transforms like rotationY rotationX, z, and perspective, including 3D transformOrigin and directional rotation functionality Supported Partially supported wiht 3rd party plugins borderRadius (without the need to define each corner and use browser prefixes) Supported Partially supported with 3rd party plugins className allows you to define a className (or use "+=" or "-=" to add/remove a class) and have the engine figure out which properties are different and animate the differences using whatever ease and duration you want. Supported Partially supported with 3rd party plugins Tweenable properties winner: GSAP Workflow When you're creating fun and interesting animations, workflow is critical. You need to be able to quickly build sequences, stagger start times, overlap tweens, experiment with eases, leverage various callbacks and labels, and create concise code. You need to be able to modularize your code by creating functions that each spit back an animation object (tween or timeline) which can be inserted into another timeline at a precise time. You need a flexible, powerful system that lets you experiment without wasting hours wrestling with a limited tool set. jQuery has some nice simple convenience methods like show(), hide(), fadeIn(), and fadeOut(), but GSAP bloodies its nose in this round: GSAP jQuery  = supported    = unsupported Easily create sequences (even with overlapping animations) that can be controlled as a whole Supported Unupported Flexible object-oriented architecture that allows animations to be nested inside other animations as deeply as you want Supported Unupported Animate things into place (backwards) with convenience methods like from() and staggerFrom() Supported Unupported Accommodate virtually any ease including Bounce, Elastic, SlowMo, RoughEase, SteppedEase, etc. Supported Unupported Create a staggered animation effect for an array of objects using one method call (like staggerTo(), staggerFrom(), or staggerFromTo()) Supported Unupported Easily repeat and/or yoyo a tween a specific number of times (or indefinitely) without resorting to callbacks or redundant code Supported Unupported Callbacks for when a tween or timeline starts, updates, completes, repeats, and finishes reversing, plus optionally pass any number of parameters to those callbacks Supported Unupported Place labels at specific times in a sequence so that you can seek() to them and/or insert animations there. Supported Unupported Animate any numeric property of any JavaScript object, not just DOM elements Supported Unupported Call a function whenever the entire platform finishes updating on each frame (like for a game loop) Supported Unupported Workflow winner: GSAP Compatibility Browser inconsistencies and bugs are the bane of our existence as developers. Whether it's the way Internet Explorer 8 implements opacity or Safari's transformOrigin bug that wreaks havok on 3D transforms or the fact that browser prefixes are required to enable many of the more modern browser features, you want your animations to "just work" without having to learn all the annoying hacks. jQuery does a great job of delivering cross-browser consistency overall, but when it comes to animation it falls a bit short mainly because it doesn't even attempt to handle the more modern CSS properties. No JavaScript framework can work miracles and suddenly make IE8 do fluid 3D transforms, for example, but GSAP implements a bunch of workarounds under the hood to solve problems wherever possible. It can do 2D transforms like rotation, scaleX, scaleY, x, y, skewX, and skewY all the way back to IE6 including transformOrigin and directional rotation functionality! Plus it works around scores of other browser issues so that you can focus on the important stuff. Compatibility winner: GSAP Popularity jQuery has been around for a long time and has gained incredible popularity because it does many things well. It's like the Swiss Army knife of JavaScript. There probably isn't a single JavaScript tool that's more popular than jQuery, and GSAP is no exception. As the new kid on the block, GSAP is gonna have to prove itself in the JavaScript community just like it did in the Flash community before it's crowned the undisputed champion. Popularity winner: jQuery Conflict management What happens if there's already a tween running that's controlling a particular object's property and a competing tween begins? jQuery does nothing to manage the conflict - the original tween keeps running. For example, let's say you're animating an element's "top" to 100px and that tween still has 2 seconds left before it's done, and another tween starts running that animates the same element's "top" to 0px over the course of 1 second. It would tween to 0px and then immediately jump to almost 100px and finish that [first] tween. Yuck. GSAP automatically senses these conflicts and handles them behind the scenes. In this case, it would kill the "top" portion of the first tween as soon as the second tween begins. Plus there are several other overwrite modes you can choose from if that's not the behavior you want. Conflict management winner: GSAP Support Both jQuery and GSAP have thriving support forums, but since right now jQuery has a massive user base, you're very likely to find someone with an answer to your question. Even though the GreenSock forums rarely have a question that remains unanswered for more than 24 hours, jQuery's pervasiveness gives it an edge here. On the other hand, GreenSock's forums are manned by paid staff (including the author of the platform), so you're quite likely to get solid answers there. Add to that the fact that GreenSock has a track record of being much more agile in terms of squashing bugs and releasing updates than jQuery, so we'll call this round a tie. Support winner: tie Expandability jQuery and GSAP both offer a plugin architecture, but since jQuery has been out much longer and gained so much popularity, there are numerous plugins available. Some are good, some are not, but there is a thriving community of plugin developers out there. Even though technically they're both equally expandable, the sheer number of plugins currently available for jQuery give it the advantage in this round. Expandability winner: jQuery Learning resources Again, jQuery's popularity trumps anything GSAP could throw at it right now. There are lots of tutorials, videos, and articles about jQuery whereas GSAP is new to the game. GreenSock is being aggressive about putting together solid resources (like the Jump Start tour) and the community is crankin' out some great articles and videos too, but jQuery scores the win in this round. Learning resources winner: jQuery Price & license Both jQuery and GSAP are completely free for almost every type of usage and both allow you to edit the raw source code to fix bugs (if that's something you need to do). If you plan to use GSAP in a product/app/site/game for which a fee is collected from multiple customers, you need the commercial license that comes with "Business Green" Club GreenSock memberships (one-off commercial projects don't need the special license). It's actually a more business-friendly license in many ways than a typical open source license that offers no warranties or backing of any kind or imposes code sharing or credit requirements. GreenSock's licensing model provides a small funding mechanism that benefits the entire user base because it empowers continued innovation and support, keeping it free for the vast majority of users. See the licensing page for details. jQuery employs an MIT license and is free for virtually all uses. As much as we all like "free" software, there's always a cost somewhere. jQuery has a few large corporate sponsors that have helped keep it viable. Both jQuery and GreenSock have long track records of delivering updates, bug fixes, and new features (GreenSock is newer to JavaScript, but served the Flash community since around 2006). Both count some of the largest companies in the world among their user base. Although there are some clear benefits of GreenSocks' license over jQuery's, we'll give this round to jQuery because it is technically "free" in more scenarios than GSAP. Price & license winner: jQuery File size jQuery weighs in at about 32kb gzipped and minified whereas GSAP's TweenLite and CSSPlugin are about half that combined. So in half the size, you're getting significantly more animation capabilities and speed. GSAP is built in a modular fashion that allows you to use just the parts that you need. Of course jQuery serves many other purposes beyond animation, but in this cage match we're focused on animation. Even if you add up TweenLite, TimelineLite, TimelineMax, TweenMax, EasePack, CSSPlugin, BezierPlugin, AttrPlugin, DirectionalRotationPlugin, and RoundPropsPlugin, it's still almost 20% less than jQuery. File size winner: GSAP Flexibility Let's face it: any tweening engine can handle the basics of animating one value to another, but it's really the details and advanced features that make a robust platform shine. GSAP crushes jQuery when it comes to delivering a refined, professional-grade tool set that's truly flexible. All these conveniences are baked into GSAP (no 3rd party plugins required): Tween any numeric property of any object. Optionally round values to the nearest integer to make sure they're always landing on whole pixels/values. Animate along Bezier curves, even rotating along with the path or plotting a smoothly curved Bezier through a set of points you provide (including 3D!). GSAP's Bezier system is super flexible in that it's not just for x/y/z coordinates - it can handle ANY set of properties. Plus it will automatically adjust the movement so that it's correctly proportioned the entire way, avoiding a common problem that plagues Bezier animation systems. You can define Bezier data as Cubic or Quadratic or raw anchor points. Animate any color property of any JavaScript object (not just DOM elements). Define colors in any of the common formats like #F00 or #FF0000 or rgb(255,0,0) or rgba(255,0,0,1) or hsl(30, 50%, 80%) or hsla(30, 50%, 80%, 0.5) or "red". Set a custom fps (frames per second) for the entire engine. The default is 60fps. All tweens are perfectly synchronized (unlike many other tweening engines). Use the modern requestAnimationFrame API to drive refreshes or a standard setTimeout (default is requestAnimationFrame with a fallback to setTimeout) Tons of easing options including proprietary SlowMo, RoughEase and SteppedEase along with all the industry standards Animate css style sheet rules themselves with CSSRulePlugin Animate the rotation of an object in a specific direction (clockwise, counter-clockwise, or whichever is shortest) by appending "_cw", "_ccw", and "_short" to the value. You can tween getter/setter methods, not just properties. For example, myObject.getProp() and myObject.setProp() can be tweened like TweenLite.to(myObject, 1, {setProp:10}); and it will automatically recognize that it's a method and call getProp() to get the current value when the tween starts. Same for jQuery-style getters/setters that use a shared method like myObject.prop(). You can even tween another tween or timeline! For example, TweenLite.to(otherTween, 1, {timeScale:0.5}) would animate otherTween.timeScale to 0.5 over the course of 1 second. You can even scrub the virtual playhead of one tween/timeine with another tween by animating its "time". Use plugins like ThrowPropsPlugin for momentum-based motion, and RaphaelPlugin, EaselPlugin, and KineticPlugin for those [canvas or svg] libraries (Raphael, EaselJS, and KineticJS). Plus there are physics-based plugins like Phyics2DPlugin and PhysicsPropsPlugin as well as a fun ScrambleTextPlugin for Club GreenSock members. Flexibility winner: GSAP Conclusion jQuery eeked out a few decent rounds, but ultimately GSAP left it lying on the mat in a pool of its own blood. Of course we're slightly biased, but check out the facts for yourself. Kick the tires. Audition GSAP on your next project. See how it feels. If you only need simple fades or very basic animation, jQuery is probably just fine. In fact, its fadeIn() and fadeOut() methods are quite convenient. However, what happens when your client wants to do something more expressive? Or what if they start complaining that animation isn't smooth on mobile devices? Why not build on a solid foundation to begin with so that you don't find yourself having to rewrite all your animation code? If you want professional-grade scripted animation, look no further. To get started fast, check out our Jump Start tour. Update: there's now a jquery.gsap.js plugin that allows you to continue using jQuery.animate() but have GSAP drive the animations under the hood, thus delivering much better speed plus a bunch of new properties that you can tween (like colors, 2D and 3D transforms, boxShadow, textShadow, borderRadius, clip, etc.). Read more about the plugin here. Recommended reading: Main GSAP JS page jQuery.animate() with GSAP: get the jquery.gsap.js plugin! Why GSAP? A practical guide for developers Jump Start: GSAP JS CSS3 transitions vs GSAP: cage match Speed comparison 3D Transforms & More CSS3 Goodies Arrive in GSAP JS
  21. GSAP itself is pure JavaScript and should work in virtually ALL browsers. GSAP wasn’t intended to solve all browser incompatibilities, but it does implement wizardry for critical features like opacity, transforms (rotation, scaleX, scaleY, skewX, skewY, x, and y), and transformOrigin so those should work in all major browsers even back to IE6. Firefox doesn’t support backgroundPositionX or backgroundPositionY, so those specific properties won’t work but backgroundPosition will for virtually all browsers. There is NOT a predetermined list of css properties that you can tween – the platform will attempt to tween ANY property you pass in. If it is numeric, it will tween it. If it isn’t numeric and it isn’t a recognized special property, CSSPlugin will just set the property to the value you provide (without tweening it). So, for example, if you try to tween to display:"inline", that isn’t a tweenable property but it will still be set accordingly during the tween, so feel free to use that to your advantage.
  22. You can animate ANY numeric property of ANY JavaScript object – it’s not just for DOM elements. So yes, you can animate canvas objects, EaselJS assets, and pretty much anything JavaScript-related. In fact, GSAP even has an EaselPlugin to make it easier to animate EaselJS properties. If you need to run logic after each refresh (like to redraw things on the canvas), either use an onUpdate on the individual tween/timeline or add a “tick” event listener to the core Ticker that drives the platform.
  23. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. We encourage you to use the updated "Getting Started" page . The GreenSock Animation Platform (GSAP) animates anything JavaScript can touch (CSS properties, SVG, React, canvas, generic objects, whatever) and solves countless browser inconsistencies, all with blazing speed (up to 20x faster than jQuery). See "Why GSAP?" to learn why it's used by over 8,000,000 sites and every major brand. Hang in there through the learning curve and you'll discover how addictive animating with code can be. We promise it's worth your time. Quick links Loading GSAP Tweening Basics CSSPlugin 2D and 3D transforms Easing Callbacks Sequencing with Timelines Timeline control Getter / Setter methods Club GreenSock We'll cover the most popular features here but keep the GSAP docs handy for all the details. First, let's talk about what GSAP actually does... GSAP as a property manipulator Animation ultimately boils down to changing property values many times per second, making something appear to move, fade, spin, etc. GSAP snags a starting value, an ending value and then interpolates between them 60 times per second. For example, changing the x coordinate of an object from 0 to 1000 over the course of 1 second makes it move quickly to the right. Gradually changing opacity from 1 to 0 makes an element fade out. Your job as an animator is to decide which properties to change, how quickly, and the motion's "style" (known as easing - we'll get to that later). To be technically accurate we could have named GSAP the "GreenSock Property Manipulator" (GSPM) but that doesn't have the same ring. DOM, SVG, <canvas>, and beyond GSAP doesn't have a pre-defined list of properties it can handle. It's super flexible, adjusting to almost anything you throw at it. GSAP can animate all of the following: CSS: 2D and 3D transforms, colors, width, opacity, border-radius, margin, and almost every CSS value (with the help of CSSPlugin). SVG attributes: viewBox, width, height, fill, stroke, cx, r, opacity, etc. Plugins like MorphSVG and DrawSVG can be used for advanced effects. Any numeric value For example, an object that gets rendered to an HTML5 <canvas>. Animate the camera position in a 3D scene or filter values. GSAP is often used with Three.js and Pixi.js. Once you learn the basic syntax you'll be able to use GSAP anywhere JavaScript runs. This guide will focus on the most popular use case: animating CSS properties of DOM elements. (Note: if you're using React, read this too.) If you're using any of the following frameworks, these articles may help: React Vue Angular What's GSAP Exactly? GSAP is a suite of tools for scripted animation. It includes: TweenLite - the lightweight core of the engine which animates any property of any object. It can be expanded using optional plugins. TweenMax - the most feature-packed (and popular) tool in the arsenal. For convenience and loading efficiency, it includes TweenLite, TimelineLite, TimelineMax, CSSPlugin, AttrPlugin, RoundPropsPlugin, BezierPlugin, and EasePack (all in one file). TimelineLite & TimelineMax - sequencing tools that act as containers for tweens, making it simple to control entire groups and precisely manage relative timing (more on this later). Extras like easing tools, plugins, utilities like Draggable, and more Loading GSAP CDN The simplest way to load GSAP is from the CDN with a <script> tag. TweenMax (and all publicly available GSAP files) are hosted on Cloudfare's super-fast and reliable cdnjs.com. <script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/gsap/2.1.3/TweenMax.min.js"></script> Banner Ad CDNs Every major ad network excludes GSAP from file size limits when you load it from their CDN! Contact your ad network for their URLs. For example, Google hosts TweenMax at: //AdWords and DoubleClick ads only "https://s0.2mdn.net/ads/studio/cached_libs/tweenmax_2.1.2_min.js" NPM npm install gsap See the NPM Usage page in the docs for a full guide including how to import things (ES modules or UMD format), tree shaking, Webpack, how to get bonus plugins into a build system, etc. Downloading GSAP Download a zip directly from our home page or your account dashboard. If you're logged in as a Club GreenSock member this zip will include your bonus plugins. GitHub View the source code on GitHub. Tweening Basics Let's start with TweenMax, GSAP's most popular tool. We'll use CodePen demos so that you can easily fork and edit each example right in your browser. TweenMax.to() To create an animation, TweenMax.to() needs 3 things: target - the object you are animating. This can be a raw object, an array of objects, or selector text like ".myClass". duration (in seconds) vars - an object with property/value pairs that you're animating to (like opacity:0.5, rotation:45, etc.) and other optional special properties like onComplete. For example, to move an element with an id of "logo" to an x position of 100 (same as transform: translateX(100px)) over the course of 1 second: TweenMax.to("#logo", 1, {x:100}); Note: Remember that GSAP isn't just for DOM elements, so you could even animate custom properties of a raw object like this: var obj = {prop:10}; TweenMax.to(obj, 1, { prop:200, //onUpdate fires each time the tween updates; we'll explain callbacks later. onUpdate:function() { console.log(obj.prop); //logs the value on each update. } }); Demo: TweenMax.to() Basic Usage See the Pen TweenMax.to() Basic Usage by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. If you would like to edit the code and experiment with your own properties and values, just hit the Edit on CodePen button. Notice that the opacity, scale, rotation and x values are all being animated in the demo above but DOM elements don't actually have those properties! In other words, there's no such thing as element.scale or element.opacity. How'd that work then? It's the magic of CSSPlugin. Before we talk about that, let's explain how plugins work in general. Plugins Think of plugins like special properties that get dynamically added to GSAP in order to inject extra abilities. This keeps the core engine small and efficient, yet allows for unlimited expansion. Each plugin is associated with a specific property name. Among the most popular plugins are: CSSPlugin*: animates CSS values AttrPlugin*: animates attributes of DOM nodes including SVG BezierPlugin*: animates along a curved Bezier path MorphSVGPlugin: smooth morphing of complex SVG paths DrawSVGPlugin: animates the length and position of SVG strokes *loaded with TweenMax CSSPlugin In the previous example, CSSPlugin automatically noticed that the target is a DOM element, so it intercepted the values and did some extra work behind the scenes, applying them as inline styles (element.style.transform and element.style.opacity in that case). Be sure to watch the "Getting Started" video at the top of this article to see it in action. CSSPlugin Features: normalizes behavior across browsers and works around various browser bugs and inconsistencies optimizes performance by auto-layerizing, caching transform components, preventing layout thrashing, etc. controls 2D and 3D transform components (x, y, rotation, scaleX, scaleY, skewX, etc.) independently (eliminating order-of-operation woes) reads computed values so you don't have to manually define starting values animates complex values like borderRadius:"50% 50%" and boxShadow:"0px 0px 20px 20px red" applies vendor-specific prefixes (-moz-, -ms-, -webkit-, etc.) when necessary animates CSS Variables handles color interpolation (rgb, rgba, hsl, hsla, hex) normalizes behavior between SVG and DOM elements (particularly useful with transforms) ...and lots more Basically, CSSPlugin saves you a ton of headaches. Because animating CSS properties is so common, GSAP automatically senses when the target is a DOM element and adds a css:{} wrapper. So internally, for example, {x:100, opacity:0.5, onComplete:myFunc} becomes {css:{x:100, opacity:0.5}, onComplete:myFunc}. That way, CSS-related values get routed to the plugin properly and you don't have to do any extra typing. You're welcome. ? To understand the advanced capabilities of the CSSPlugin read the full CSSPlugin documentation. 2D and 3D transforms CSSPlugin recognizes a number of short codes for transform-related properties: GSAP CSS x: 100 transform: translateX(100px) y: 100 transform: translateY(100px) rotation: 360 transform: rotate(360deg) rotationX: 360 transform: rotateX(360deg) rotationY: 360 transform: rotateY(360deg) skewX: 45 transform: skewX(45deg) skewY: 45 transform: skewY(45deg) scale: 2 transform: scale(2, 2) scaleX: 2 transform: scaleX(2) scaleY: 2 transform: scaleY(2) xPercent: 50 transform: translateX(50%) yPercent: 50 transform: translateY(50%) GSAP can animate any "transform" value but we strongly recommend using the shortcuts above because they're faster and more accurate (GSAP can skip parsing computed matrix values which are inherently ambiguous for rotational values beyond 180 degrees). The other major convenience GSAP affords is independent control of each component while delivering a consistent order-of-operation. Performance note: it's much easier for browsers to update x and y (transforms) rather than top and left which affect document flow. So to move something, we recommend animating x and y. Demo: Multiple 2D and 3D transforms See the Pen Multiple 2D and 3D Transforms by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Additional CSSPlugin notes Be sure to camelCase all hyphenated properties. font-size should be fontSize, background-color should be backgroundColor. When animating positional properties such as left and top, its imperative that the elements you are trying to move also have a css position value of absolute, relative or fixed. vw/vh units aren't currently supported natively, but it's pretty easy to mimic using some JS like x: window.innerWidth * (50 / 100) where 50 is the vw. Just ask in the forums for some help. from() tweens Sometimes it's amazingly convenient to set up your elements where they should end up (after an intro animation, for example) and then animate from other values. That's exactly what TweenMax.from() is for. For example, perhaps your "#logo" element currently has its natural x position at 0 and you create the following tween: TweenMax.from("#logo", 1, {x:100}); The #logo will immediately jump to an x of 100 and animate to an x of 0 (or whatever it was when the tween started). In other words, it's animating FROM the values you provide to whatever they currently are. Demo: TweenMax.from() with multiple properties See the Pen TweenMax.from() tween by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. There is also a fromTo() method that allows you to define the starting values and the ending values: //tweens from width 0 to 100 and height 0 to 200 TweenMax.fromTo("#logo", 1.5, {width:0, height:0}, {width:100, height:200}); Special properties (like onComplete) A special property is like a reserved keyword that GSAP handles differently than a normal (animated) property. Special properties are used to define callbacks, delays, easing and more. A basic example of a special property is delay: TweenMax.to("#logo", 1, {x:100, delay:3}); This animation will have a 3-second delay before starting. Other common special properties are: onComplete - a callback that should be triggered when the animation finishes. onUpdate - a callback that should be triggered every time the animation updates/renders ease - the ease that should be used (like Power2.easeInOut) Easing If your animation had a voice, what would it sound like? Should it look playful? Robotic? Slick? Realistic? To become an animation rock star, you must develop a keen sense of easing because it determines the style of movement between point A and point B. The video below illustrates the basics. An "ease" controls the rate of change during a tween. Below is an interactive tool that allows you to visually explore various eases. Note: you can click on the underlined parts of the code at the bottom to change things.
  24. Hello There , Swedish London based Rich Media Banner Developer & Designer, with over a decade of experience of building banners for a wide range of clients. Canvas or no canvas? No problem. Greensock or Pixie? Can do. Story-boarding needed? Yes. Video? You bet! Interactive Javascript or image slider? Consider it done! Can work over Zeplin or WeTransfer, whatever you prefer. A codepen sample of my work: https://codepen.io/ThomasJames/pen/RXQrzp Some of the companies I worked with: WWF, Wunderman Ogilvy Gamesys, TBWA\Copenhagen, MRM Meteorite, McCann, The Two Marias, NKD Learning, DOOH, York Press, TAG Worldwide Ad banner platforms I work with: Google Studio, Google Campaign Manager, Flashtalking, Celtra, Sizmek, Adform, Admeto, +Yours (Send me the specs!) Contact me at hello@thomasthorstensson.co.uk for more samples of recent work and a discussion of what you need done!
  25. Sceik

    Nine Flipcards

    Hey there master-tweeners, So for an online portfolio I'm creating I wanted to add a container with ''things I'm good at''. I wanted to make it out of 9 flipcards with an image or logo on the front, and a small text on the back. Onclick they're supposed to flip around and stay that way untill clicked again. Now so far I've come across two methods to achieve this, but both come with some complications. The first method On first glance it looks like it does exactly what I want. The animation is smooth and steady. The problem though is when you click on the (first) card twice in a row, the second animation starts halfway through the first animation disaligning the starting position. (Bad explanation, try it yourself in the codepen lol) The second method This is much less Tweening which is nice because I have to do it for nine cards, but there's something I want, but cant get with this method. I really like the way the cards bounce with the bounce ease when they flip. Since this method uses a reverse, the bounce reverses too which looks weird, obviously. Just get to the point already I guess my questions are the following, - Is there a way to fix the problem in the first method? - Is there a way to fix the problem in the second method? - Most importantly, what method do you guys recommend? - What's the most efficient way to get this to work on nine cards, without copy-pasting the whole thing nine times? Thanks in advance ? Codepens used in the process (the one on the bottom is mine): https://codepen.io/rhernando/pen/vjGxH https://codepen.io/chrisgannon/pen/JtljL
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