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  1. I can't create a code-pen the code is all using c# for values and variables, equally the images are stored securely on IP restricted connections, there isn't a need to view the demo anyway I just need to know how to allow vertical scrolling of the web page when clicking and dragging vertically on the slider section. This is the draggable code is there is a value I need to change It fully prevents the web page being scrolled over on mobile as it only allows the horizontal scroll, I obviously don't want that because it is useless to the web pages functionality, I am surprised whatever is doing it is set up this way in the first place. var w_width = $(window).width(); var position_obj = []; const slider = document.querySelector('.slides'); var half_w_width = w_width / 2; $('.slide').each(function () { position_obj.push($(this).offset().left); }); $(document).ready(function () { if ($('.slides').length === 0) { return; } Draggable.create(".slides", { type: "scrollLeft", edgeResistance: 0.9, maxDuration: 1.2, minDuration: 1.2, lockAxis: true, onThrowUpdate: function () { var wrapper_left = this.x * -1 + half_w_width; $(position_obj).each(function (i, val) { obj_c = i + 1; if (val < wrapper_left) { $('.slide').removeClass('active'); $('#slide_' + obj_c).addClass('active'); } }); }, snap: function (e) { var span_window_w = $(window).width(); return -Math.round(Math.round(e / (.3 * span_window_w)) * (.3 * span_window_w)); // This changes the threshold for dragging and snapping the obj's }, }), TweenMax.set(".slides", { overflow: "scroll" }), $(".slides").scroll(function () { $(".parallax").each(function () { var leftOffset = $(this).offset().left; var element_w = $(this).width(); leftOffset < w_width && leftOffset + element_w > 0 && TweenLite.to($(this), 1.2, { xPercent: (w_width - leftOffset) / w_width * $(this).attr("data-velocity"), overwrite: 0 }); }); }); });
  2. Welcome @kevinMario! Yeah, this is an overwriting issue. When a tween renders for the first time, it checks to see if there are any other tweens of the same property (on the same target) and if any are found, it kills them so that they're not fighting for control. Otherwise, you'd have one tween making the property go one direction, and another tween making it go in another direction. That's what we call "auto overwriting". You have overlapping/conflicting tweens - that's what's causing the problem. The reason it works the first time is because overwriting doesn't occur until the tween renders for the first time. So as soon as the 2nd tween starts, the first one gets killed (and that one doesn't come back). Therefore, the second time through the timeline, that first tween is dead. You can easily see if there's an overwrite happening by using the TweenLite.onOverwrite static method: TweenLite.onOverwrite = function(overwrittenTween, overwritingTween) { console.log("overwritten!"); } You can either prevent them from overlapping (adjust your code) or you could set overwrite:false on your tweens. Or set TweenLite.defaultOverwrite = false. I hope that helps!
  3. Hi, I'm trying to figure out how to make a tween autocomplete when it is overwritten. I have something rotating by '+=180', so if it is interrupted, it ends up at an odd angle. Is there an easy way to do this in GSAP JS? Thanks, Gavan
  4. I come from actionscript tweenLite, and I was wondering if you still could overwrite the variable to change the tween like in actionscript like so: var myTween=tweenLite.to(object,1,{left:"10px"}); myTween=tweenLite.to(object,1,{right:"5px"}); What I would like is a mouseover animation, but a different one mouseout animation (not just reversing the tween). Here's what I have now: var bot0 = $("#tapa0"); clipTween40 = TweenLite.to(bot0, .2, {top:"-192px", backgroundColor:"rgba(172, 221, 255,.85)", ease:Cubic.easeOut, paused:true}); bot0.parent().mouseenter(function() {clipTween40.play();}); bot0.parent().mouseleave(function() {clipTween40.reverse();}); Maybe by overwriting the tween... I've tried without much success.
  5. Hi Here's my JS: var del = 0; divs = $('.nav'); for(ind in divs){ del+=.1; div = divs[ind]; var target = div; TweenMax.to(target, 1, {css:"opacity:1", delay:del, ease:Sine.easeOut, overwrite:"none"}); } and CSS: .nav { color:#000; font-family: 'custom', helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 4.25em; opacity:0; } Problem: the tweens overwrite each other, resulting in this 'graded' effect attached (half opacities). What am I doing wrong? I want all divs to tween to an opacity of 1. Thanks!
  6. hey.. i'm wondering if any of the overwrite modes complete a currently running tween? eg- TweenMax.to(box, 0.5, {css:{rotationY:"+=180"}}); if this is called again before it completes the box ends up at what ever angle it was at +180 to prevent this at the moment i'm putting before this tween another one.. TweenMax.to(box, 0, {css:{rotationY:0}}); but i'm hoping there is a cleaner way to do this. here's the full code http://jsfiddle.net/ninjabonsai/WPczm/ cheers
  7. Very interesting - it definitely seems Vue-related. If I remove Vue from the equation, it all works as expected. From what I can tell, the issue gets introduced as soon as you load CSSPlugin which enables the "autoCSS" feature, wrapping all the non-protected properties into a css:{} object in the vars (protected ones are things like onComplete, overwrite, etc.). If you set autoCSS:false on your first tween, it seems to resolve things too. I wonder if Vue is somehow swapping things out from underneath GSAP. Very odd indeed.
  8. Hi Jack, thanks for the gsap. From what i see the overwrite auto does not work for tweens initiated via css className. So if you have say an on-mouseover and add a css class {css:{className:"+=class1"}} and then mouse-out before the css property tweens are complete and remove the class {css:{className:"-=class1"}}, the first tween/s are not cancelled and continue to completion - and then the remove class takes effect immediately. If you use overwrite "all" - all tweens stop as expected. Cheers
  9. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Note: the ActionScript version of the GreenSock Animation Platform still works great and you're welcome to use it, but it is no longer officially supported. Our customer base made it very clear that JavaScript was the future of web-based dynamic animation, and we have been focused there for years. Please see the JavaScript Getting Started Guide for more information. Quick links Introduction Installing the code Importing Basic tweening with TweenLite Special properties Plugins Overwriting other tweens Controling tweens Which class do I use? TweenLite? TweenMax? TweenNano? Building a sequence with TimelineLite Need help? Introduction Animating with code may seem intimidating at first, but don't worry - you'll get the hang of it quickly. The GreenSock Animation Platform (GSAP) was engineered to make it simple and intuitive. For now, we'll focus on getting you up and running with the core engine, TweenLite, and then we'll discuss if and when you might want to put the other tools to work for you (like TweenMax, TimelineLite, TimelineMax, etc.). Installing the code Go to your account dashboard page and click the AS2 or AS3 link in the downloads area to download a zip file containing the entire GreenSock Animation Platform in the language you specified. Unzip the file and you'll see a folder containing several swfs, documentation, and a folder named "com" - that's the critical one. Take that "com" folder with all its contents and drop it into the same folder as your FLA file (or if you're an advanced user, set up a classpath to wherever you want). Make sure that you leave the directory structure inside the "com" folder in-tact; it has a "greensock" folder with several ActionScript files inside, along with a few subdirectories. You can throw away the swfs from the zip download and the documentation, etc. if you want. The only critical files are inside that "com" folder. When you publish your swf, Flash looks for that "com" folder, reads the code from inside of it, and embeds it into your published swf. You do NOT need to put the "com" folder on your web server. Once the swf is created, it is completely independent and has no dependencies on the class files because they have been embedded into the compressed swf. Your FLA file has the dependencies, not the swf. There's a great ActiveTuts article here about using 3rd party tools in your Flash projects and it covers some of the more advanced installation/configuration options. Importing In order for Flash to understand what you mean when you type "TweenLite" (or "TweenMax" or any of the GreenSock classes), you must tell it where to find the class file(s). That's what an import statement does. It acts as a pointer that tells Flash where it should look. After all, there could be a completely different "TweenLite" class that another author created, and you need a way to tell Flash which one you're talking about. Typically you put your import statement at the top of the frame or the custom class you created. And, yes, just like any class, you must add the import statement to all frames or classes that contain code referencing it. This does not add extra kb to your file every time you import it. Flash is smart enough to embed it once and all the import statements just act as a "pointer" to the embedded class. To import just the TweenLite class, do: import com.greensock.TweenLite; To import TweenLite and TweenMax, do: import com.greensock.TweenLite; import com.greensock.TweenMax; To import all of the classes in the com.greensock package (don't worry, Flash will only embed the classes that you actually use in your code), do: import com.greensock.*; You'll probably also want to import the easing classes as well (we'll talk more about them later), so this is code that you should get used to putting at the top of your frames or class files because it covers almost everything you'd need and it's shorter than typing out each class every time: import com.greensock.*; import com.greensock.easing.*; Basic tweening with TweenLite Each tween you create needs a target (the object you want to tween), the duration of the tween (typically described in seconds), and the properties that you want to tween, along with their corresponding end values. Let's say, for example, you have a MovieClip named "mc" and you'd like to tween its x property to a value of 100 (sliding it across the screen) over the course of 1.5 seconds. You can use TweenLite's to() method to do it: TweenLite.to(mc, 1.5, {x:100}); The first parameter is the target, the second is the duration, and the third is an object with one or more properties that correspond to your target object's properties. Since it's a to() tween, you're telling TweenLite to tween from whatever the x property happens to be at the time the tween begins (now in this case), to a value of 100. If you want to also tween the y property to 200 and the alpha property to 0.5, you'd do: TweenLite.to(mc, 1.5, {x:100, y:200, alpha:0.5}); There is no limit to the number of properties you can tween. And TweenLite can tween any numeric property of any object, not just a predetermined list of DisplayObject/MovieClip properties. Since there's an AS2 version as well, you can simply change the property names to reflect their AS2 equivalents, like: TweenLite.to(mc, 1.5, {_x:100, _y:200, _alpha:50}); Here's an interactive demo that allows you to build tweens yourself and see the corresponding code at the bottom: There is also a very useful from() method that allows you to define the starting values in the tween and go backwards. So the current values will be used as the end values, and the ones you define in the tween will be the starting values. This makes it easy to, for example, set things up on the stage where you'd like the objects to end, and then animate them into place. Let's say your mc object's y property is at 200 and alpha is at 1, and you'd like to have it "drop" into place from above while fading in over the course of 1.5 seconds, you could do: TweenLite.from(mc, 1.5, {y:0, alpha:0}); If you prefer a more object-oriented approach and/or would like to store references to your tweens in variables so that you can control them later (for example, pause(), resume(), reverse(), restart()), you can create a tween like this (which is identical to a to() tween): var myTween:TweenLite = new TweenLite(mc, 1, {x:100, y:200, alpha:0.5}); Special properties A special property is a reserved keyword that TweenLite recognizes and handles differently than it would a normal property. One example is delay which allows you to delay a tween from starting until a certain number of seconds has elapsed. For example, this tween will wait 2 seconds before beginning: TweenLite.to(mc, 1, {x:100, delay:2}); TweenLite recognizes several special properties that are quite useful, like onComplete, ease, overwrite, paused, useFrames, immediateRender, onStart, onUpdate, onCompleteParams, and more. Please read the full documentation for details. Two of the most common special properties you'll likely use are ease and onComplete. To alter the rate of change during a tween, you can choose from many different easing equations from either the com.greensock.easing package or Flash's own easing classes or Robert Penner's. The interactive demo above allows you to chose different equations and see how they affect the tween. The onComplete special property gives you a way to call any function when the tween completes, making it simple to create a chain of events. Here is a tween that uses the Elastic.easeOut ease, delays its start time by 0.5 seconds, and calls myFunction() when it completes: TweenLite.to(mc, 1.5, {x:100, ease:Elastic.easeOut, delay:0.5, onComplete:myFunction}); function myFunction():void { trace("tween finished"); } Plugins Think of plugins like special properties that are dynamically added to TweenLite (and/or TweenMax), giving it extra abilities that it doesn't normally have by default. Each plugin is associated with a property name and it takes responsibility for handling that property. For example, the FrameLabelPlugin is associated with the frameLabel property name so if it is activated it will intercept the frameLabel property in the following tween and manage it uniquely: TweenLite.to(mc, 1, {frameLabel:"myLabel"}); If the FrameLabelPlugin wasn't activated, TweenLite would act as though you were trying to literally tween the mc.frameLabel property (and there is no such thing). Activating a plugin requires a single line of code and you only need to do it once in your application, so it's pretty easy. Simply pass an Array containing the names of all the plugins you'd like to activate to the TweenPlugin.activate() method, like this: import com.greensock.plugins.*; TweenPlugin.activate([FrameLabelPlugin, ColorTransformPlugin, TintPlugin]); To make it even easier, I created the Plugin Explorer which writes the code for you. All you need to do is select the plugins and copy/paste the code from the bottom of the tool. It also displays interactive examples of each plugin and the associated code so that it's easy to see the correct syntax. TweenLite does not activate any plugins by default, but TweenMax does. When a plugin is activated, it affects both TweenLite and TweenMax. Overwriting other tweens An often overlooked aspect of tweening is how (and if and when) tweens overwrite other tweens of the same object. For example, let's say you have a button with ROLL_OVER and ROLL_OUT handlers that tween its alpha higher on ROLL_OVER and lower on ROLL_OUT. To further complicate things, let's say the ROLL_OVER tween lasts 2 seconds and the ROLL_OUT tween lasts 1 second. What should happen if the user rolls over/out/over/out quickly? See the problem? If tweens are allowed to run without any kind of overwriting, they'll build up and fight with each other (one trying to tween the alpha higher, and the other lower). In this example, when the user rolls over, a 2-second tween would start increasing the alpha to 1, but if the user rolled off 0.2 seconds later, another tween would begin, causing the alpha to decrease. When that tween finishes 1 second later, the ROLL_OVER tween is still going (since it had a duration of 2 seconds), so the alpha would suddenly jump up and finish off at a value of 1 even though the user rolled out! Don't worry. We've got you covered. By default, whenever a TweenLite instance renders for the first time (after any delay), it analyzes all other active tweens of the same target and checks for individual overlapping properties. If it finds any, it kills the offending overlaps (again, only the individual properties). This overwrite mode is called "auto" and it is typically the most intuitive. However, there may be times when you want the new tween to kill all other tweens of the same object regardless of their start times or overlapping properties. That is what the "all" overwrite mode is for. And to skip overwriting altogether, you can define an overwrite mode of "none". There are several other modes to choose from too, so check out the full docs for details. You define an overwrite mode with the overwrite special property like this: //overwrites all tweens of mc immediately TweenLite.to(mc, 1, {x:50, overwrite:"all"}); //doesn't overwrite anything (allows conflicts) TweenLite.to(mc, 1, {x:50, overwrite:"none"}); //overwrites only individual overlapping properties on concurrent tweens of mcmyElement (this is the default, so you typically don't need to specify any overwrite in this scenario) TweenLite.to(mc, 1, {x:50, overwrite:"auto"}); //set the default overwrite mode to "all" instead of "auto" TweenLite.defaultOverwrite = "all"; Of course you can manually kill all the tweens of a particular object using the TweenLite.killTweensOf() method, but the nice thing about defining overwrite modes is that the overwriting doesn't kick in until it's necessary (when the tween renders for the first time) which is essential when working with complex sequences. Controlling tweens Once a tween is created, you may want to pause(), resume(), reverse(), play(), restart(), invalidate(), or kill() it. It's pretty easy, actually: var myTween:TweenLite = new TweenLite(mc, 1, {x:100, y:100}); //pause myTween.pause(); //resume (honors direction - reversed or not) myTween.resume(); //reverse (always goes back towards the beginning) myTween.reverse(); //play() (always goes forwards) myTween.play(); //restart myTween.restart(); //invalidate (clears out any starting values that were recorded and forces the tween to re-initialize on the next render) myTween.invalidate(); //kill the tween immediately myTween.kill(); //kill all tweens of the mc object TweenLite.killTweensOf(mc); TweenMax has some additional static methods for getting all the tweens of a particular object, pausing them all, resuming, getting tweens of objects that are children of a certain DisplayObject, and more (see documentation for details). Which class do I use? TweenLite? TweenMax? TweenNano? If you can afford the file size (roughly 23kb with the default plugins), just use TweenMax. It is the most full-featured tweening engine and it automatically handles activating a bunch of useful plugins by default, so it makes things very easy. If, however, you're concerned about file size and want precise control over which plugins get activated, TweenLite is for you. It's amazingly capable for its size and has all the essentials crammed into about 8kb. It is really the core of the whole platform and has become incredibly popular. If you simply must shave off another 6k and are willing to sacrifice quite a few features (most notably lack of support for plugins and insertion into TimelineLite/Max instances), use the ridiculously small 2k TweenNano. I would strongly recommend sticking with TweenLite or TweenMax if you can, though, because they offer much more flexibility than TweenNano. All of the engines use exactly the same syntax, so these lines will produce identical results: TweenNano.to(mc, 1.5, {x:100, y:200, onComplete:myFunction, ease:Strong.easeOut}); TweenLite.to(mc, 1.5, {x:100, y:200, onComplete:myFunction, ease:Strong.easeOut}); TweenMax.to(mc, 1.5, {x:100, y:200, onComplete:myFunction, ease:Strong.easeOut}); Keep in mind that TweenMax extends TweenLite, so it does everything TweenLite does, plus more. And the plugins that are activated by default in TweenMax can also be activated in TweenLite (the only exception being roundProps), so with a couple of extra lines of code at the start of your application, TweenLite can have many of the same capabilities as TweenMax (activating plugins increases the file size beyond 4.7k obviously). There are several features that are only available in TweenMax, though, so check the documentation. Sequencing and grouping tweens with TimelineLite Unlike most other scripted animation tools, sequencing in GSAP is much more flexible than building a queue of tweens that run one-after-the-other. You have complete control over the relative timing of each tween - they can overlap as much as you want. And you can control entire sequences as a whole, reverse smoothly anytime, jump to any point, adjust the timeScale(), etc. and everything renders in the proper order. Watch this video for a visual demo showing how TimelineLite can save you a lot of time. Although the video uses the HTML5/JavaScript version of GSAP, the same concepts apply to ActionScript. Of course you could sequence tweens by using the delay special property on all your tweens, but that can get complicated when you build a long sequence and then later want to change the timing of something early in the sequence (you'd have to adjust all the delay values in tweens after that). Plus it would be a pain to control the whole sequence, like to pause() or resume() or reverse() the group on-the-fly. Sequencing is much easier with TimelineLite and its big brother, TimelineMax. Let's jump into some sample code: //create a TimelineLite instance var tl = new TimelineLite(); //append a to() tween tl.to(mc, 1, {x:50}); //add another sequenced tween (by default, tweens are added to the end of the timeline which makes sequencing simple) tl.to(mc, 1, {height:300p, ease:Elastic.easeOut}); //offset the next tween by 0.75 seconds so there's a gap between the end of the previous tween and this new one tl.to(mc, 1, {alpha:0.5}, "+=0.75"); //overlap the next tween with the previous one by 0.5 seconds (notice the negative offset at the end) tl.to(mc, 1, {rotation:360}, "-=0.5"); //animate 3 MovieClips (mc1, mc2, and mc3) to a rotation of 60 degrees, and stagger their start times by 0.2 seconds tl.staggerTo([mc1, mc2, mc3], 1, {rotation:60}, 0.2); //then call myFunction() tl.call(myFunction); //now we can control the entire sequence with the standard methods like these: tl.pause(); tl.resume(); tl.restart(); tl.reverse(); tl.play(); //jump to exactly 2.5 seconds into the animation tl.seek(2.5); //slow down playback to 10% of the normal speed tl.timeScale(0.1); //add a label named "myLabel" at exactly 3 seconds: tl.add("myLabel", 3); //add a tween that starts at "myLabel" tl.add( TweenLite.to(mc, 1, {scale:0.5}), "myLabel"); //jump to "myLabel" and play from there: tl.play("myLabel"); Think of a timeline (as in a TimelineLite or TimelineMax instance) like a collection of tweens that are positioned at specific places on that timeline. It controls their playback. Timelines can be nested inside other timelines as deeply as you want. This is a very powerful concept because it allows you to control entire sequences in a modular way. Imagine 100 characters individually animating into place in a staggered fashion (100 tweens). They could all be grouped into a TimelineLite instance and then controled as a whole (using common methods like pause(), resume(), reverse(), restart(), etc.). In fact, you could create functions that return animations wrapped in a TimelineLite so that you can easily build a larger, more complex animation in a modular way. A central concept to grasp is that every tween is inserted into a timeline. By default, it's the root timeline inside the engine. When a timeline is playing, its virtual playhead advances. If you reverse() a timeline, the playhead travels in the opposite direction back towards its beginning. As the timeline's playhead encounters tweens, it plays them accordingly. For example, if the playhead is positioned halfway through a tween, that tween will render as though it is 50% finished. If the timeline's timeScale() is set to 0.5, that would cause the playhead to travel at half speed. Consequently, any tweens it encounters would also appear to progress at half speed. Once you get the hang of how timelines work, they can revolutionize your animation workflow. Just like tweens, timelines play immediately by default but you can pause them initially using pause() or by setting paused:true in the vars parameter of the constructor. There are quite a few methods available in the timeline classes that give you precise control, and we'd encourage you to look through the docs to see what's available. If you can think of something you'd like to do, chances are there's a way to do it. Just like the way TweenMax extends TweenLite, TimelineMax extends TimelineLite, using identical syntax and adding several useful (but non-essential) features like AS3 event dispatching, repeat(), repeatDelay(), getActive(), getLabelAfter(), getLabelBefore(), currentLabel(), and more. Please refer to the TimelineMax documentation for details. Here's an interactive demo of TimelineMax: Need help? Feel free to post your question on the forums. Keep in mind that you'll increase your chances of getting a prompt answer if you provide a brief explanation and include a simplified FLA file (and any class files) that clearly demonstrates the problem.
  10. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Update: don't miss our guest post on css-tricks.com, Myth Busting: CSS Animations vs. JavaScript which provides some additional data, visual examples, and a speed test focused on this topic. Ever since CSS3 "transitions" and "animations" were introduced, they have been widely lauded as the future of animation on the web. It often seems like all the "cool kids" are talking about them. Should you jump on the bandwagon? Is JavaScript animation headed for extinction? How does the new GreenSock Animation Platform (GSAP) fare when it steps into the ring and faces off against the hyped-up tag-team of CSS3 transitions & animations? Does GSAP have the chops to hold its own? Let's find out. Ready...FIGHT! Performance One of the most common arguments in favor of CSS3 animations has been that they're hardware accelerated, thus outperform any JavaScript-based equivalent. The theory is that if you define your transitions/animations directly in css, the browser can worry about all the calculations behind the scenes and tap into hardware and native code to execute them. Sounds awesome. Unfortunately it's not quite that clean. Only certain properties are hardware-accelerated (like 3D transforms and opacity - mostly ones that don't affect document flow) and different browsers handle things differently. Plus every comparison we saw on the web pitted CSS3 transitions against jQuery, but GSAP is up to 20 times faster than jQuery. In our real-world tests, we saw drastic differences in performance among the various browsers and when tested head-to-head against GSAP, CSS3 animations were usually slower! Weird. As expected, however, 3D transforms were indeed faster under heavy stress although in most situations you'd never notice a difference. GSAP is extremely optimized. UPDATE (2015-01-05): There are some interesting (and surprising) performance implications of using CSS animations that aren't widely known. Here's a screencast that shows how Dev Tools doesn't report the overhead involved with CSS animations, some synchronization problems, and how they can drag down the main thread performance more than JS. To see a simple comparison for yourself, select the "Zepto" engine in the speed comparison because it uses CSS3 transitions for its animations, and then compare it to GSAP. Beware that the fps (frames per second) counter in the lower right corner isn't always accurate in some browsers (like recent versions of Safari) when using CSS3 transitions because requestAnimationFrame events [incorrectly] get dispatched even when the screen is clearly not being updated. So the animation may actually be running at a very jerky 10fps, yet 50+ requestAnimationFrame cycles are being triggered by the browser! This exposes another flaw in CSS3 transitions - there's no way to know when updates truly occur. There's only a "complete" event fired at the end of the transition/animation. If anyone knows how to get a more accurate fps counter in Safari while using CSS3 transitions, please let us know. Another performance issue to note in the speed comparison is the clumping that occurs with many engines (including Zepto) under heavy stress, where the stars begin pulsing out in rings instead of a nicely dispersed field. Even though GSAP was faster than CSS3 transitions in the majority of our real-world tests, it's still true that 3D transforms and opacity tweens are faster with CSS3 transitions and it's possible that browsers will be able to further tap into hardware acceleration in the future, so we'll call this round a tie. Feel free to build your own tests to see how things compare in your workflow. Performance winner: TIE Controls This is one of the major weak spots for CSS transitions (its "glass jaw" of sorts). Let's say you invest the time in writing a bunch of css for a whiz-bang animation and then you need to control the whole thing - good luck with that. It is virtually impossible. GSAP's object oriented architecture allows you to pause, resume, reverse, restart, or seek to any spot in any tween. Even adjust timeScale on the fly for slow motion or fastforward effects. Place tweens in a timeline with precise scheduling (including overlaps or gaps) and then control the whole thing just like it's a single tween. All of the easing and effects remain perfectly intact as you reverse, adjust timeScale, etc. (with CSS transitions, easing flip-flops upon reverse). You can even kill individual portions of a tween anytime (like if a tween is controlling both "top" and "left" properties, you can kill "left" while "top" continues). Put labels in a timeline to mark important spots and seek() to them anytime. Imagine trying to build the example below using CSS transitions. It would be virtually impossible. With GSAP, it's easy. In fact, all of the animation is done with 2 lines of code. Drag the scrubber, click the buttons below, and see how easy it is to control the sequenced animation. Controls winner: GSAP Tweenable Properties Both competitors can animate transforms (2D and 3D), colors, borderRadius, boxShadow, and pretty much every important property, but there's one key shortcoming of CSS - you cannot animate individual transforms distinctly! For example, try rotating an object and then halfway through that animation, start scaling it with a different ease and finish at a different time. Since all transforms (scaleX, scaleY, rotation, rotationX, rotationY, skewX, skewY, x, y, and z) are all mashed into one "transform" property, it's virtually impossible to handle them distinctly. GSAP not only works around this limitation, but it also allows you to do advanced things like animate along Bezier paths or do momentum-based motion (with ThrowPropsPlugin) or relative tweens or animate the scroll position or do directional rotation or physics-based motion, etc. Plus GSAP can animate any numeric property of any object, not just DOM elements. Do you really want to use one toolset (CSS) for animating DOM elements and then have to switch to a completely different toolset and syntax when you do canvas-based animation? GSAP handles both consistently. CSS transitions and animations just can't compete here. Tweenable properties winner: GSAP Workflow When you're creating fun and interesting animations, workflow is critical. You need to be able to quickly build sequences, stagger start times, overlap tweens, experiment with eases, leverage various callbacks and labels, and create concise code. It would be great to modularize your code by creating functions that each spit back an animation object (tween or timeline) which can be inserted into another timeline at a precise time. You need a flexible, powerful system that lets you experiment without wasting hours. GSAP wipes the floor with CSS transitions in this round. Anyone who has attempted an ambitious project with CSS3 transitions/animations will attest to the fact that they tend to get very cumbersome and verbose. Experimenting with timing and fine-tuning details can get extremely tedious especially when dealing with all the browser prefixes. GSAP CSS3 transitions = supported = unsupported Flexible object-oriented architecture that allows animations to be nested inside other animations as deeply as you want Supported Unsupported Concise code that doesn't require vendor prefixes Supported Unsupported Create sequences (even with overlapping animations) that auto-adjust as you insert/remove/change intermediate pieces of animation (makes experimenting MUCH easier) Supported Unsupported Accommodate virtually any ease including Bounce, Elastic, SlowMo, RoughEase, SteppedEase, etc. Supported Unsupported Animate things into place (backwards) with convenience methods like from() and staggerFrom() Supported Unsupported Callbacks for when an animation starts, updates, completes, repeats, and finishes reversing, plus optionally pass any number of parameters to those callbacks Supported Unsupported Place labels at specific times in a sequence so that you can seek() there (and/or insert animations there) Supported Unsupported Animate any numeric property of any JavaScript object, not just DOM elements (great for canvas-based animation). Supported Unsupported Workflow winner: GSAP Compatibility CSS transitions simply don't work in older browsers, even Internet Explorer 9. GSAP works in all browsers (although some particular features may be disabled, like 3D transforms in IE8). Once again, this round was no contest. GSAP can even do 2D transforms like rotation, scaleX, scaleY, x, y, skewX, and skewY all the way back to IE6 including transformOrigin functionality! Plus it works around scores of other browser issues so that you can focus on the important stuff. Safari's 3D transformOrigin bug? No problem. Firefox's flashing 3D elements bug? No worries. Inconsistency in IE's backgroundPosition values? GSAP has you covered. Vendor prefixes? Nah, GSAP adds 'em for you when necessary. Compatibility winner: GSAP Popularity CSS3 transitions have been talked about (and used) for years all over the web whereas GSAP is relatively new. It can't match CSS3 transitions' popularity. As clients start pushing for more aggressive animations and HTML5 games proliferate and operating systems become very JavaScript-friendly, the balance may very well shift quickly. For now, though, this round goes squarely to CSS transitions. Popularity winner: CSS3 transitions Conflict management What happens if a particular set of properties (like "left" and "top") are animating and then you need to redirect one of those to a different value (like "left" to 100px instead of 300px) using a different ease and duration? With CSS transitions, it's a very complex process. With GSAP, it's simple and automatic. In fact, there are several overwrite modes you can choose from. Conflict management winner: GSAP Support There are numerous places on the web where you can ask the community your CSS transitions-related questions, but GSAP has dedicated support forums where there's rarely a question that remains unanswered for more than 24 hours. GreenSock's forums are manned by paid staff (including the author of the platform), so you're quite likely to get solid answers there. Add to that the fact that GreenSock has a track record of being much more agile in terms of squashing bugs and releasing updates than browsers do for CSS3 transitions, so GSAP gets the upper hand here. Support winner: GSAP Expandability GSAP employs a plugin architecture, making it relatively easy to add features and custom animation properties but CSS transitions have no such equivalent. You're stuck with what the browsers decide to offer. In addition to CSSPlugin, GSAP already has plugins like ScrollToPlugin for scrolling to specific window or div scroll positions, BezierPlugin for animating along Bezier curves, ThrowPropsPlugin for momentum-based motion, and RaphaelPlugin, EaselPlugin, and KineticPlugin for those libraries (Raphael, EaselJS, and KineticJS). Plus there are physics-based plugins like Phyics2DPlugin and PhysicsPropsPlugin as well as a fun ScrambleTextPlugin for Club GreenSock members. More plugins are on their way, and you can create your own too. Expandability winner: GSAP Learning resources Again, the popularity of CSS3 transitions trumps anything GSAP could throw at it right now. There are lots of tutorials, videos, and articles about CSS3 transitions whereas GSAP is new to the game. GreenSock is being aggressive about putting together solid resources (like the Jump Start tour) and the community is crankin' out some great articles and videos too, but CSS3 transitions score the win in this round. Learning resources winner: CSS3 TRANSITIONS Price & license Both CSS3 transitions and GSAP are completely free for almost every type of usage. GSAP allows you to edit the raw source code to fix bugs (if that's something you need to do), but there's no way to edit the source code that drives CSS3 transitions. Then again, there's no special license required to use them either. If you plan to use GSAP in a product/app/site/game for which a fee is collected from multiple customers, you need the commercial license that comes with "Business Green" Club GreenSock memberships (one-off commercial projects don't require the special license). It's actually a more business-friendly license in many ways than a typical open source license that offers no warranties or backing of any kind or imposes code sharing or credit requirements. GreenSock's licensing model provides a small funding mechanism that benefits the entire user base because it empowers continued innovation and support, keeping it free for the vast majority of users. See the licensing page for details. Although there are some clear benefits of GreenSock's model, we'll give this round to CSS3 transitions because using them is technically "free" in more scenarios than GSAP. Price & license winner: CSS3 TRANSITIONS File size This is a tricky round indeed because GSAP requires inclusion of at least 1 JavaScript file whereas CSS3 transitions leverage native code in the browser, but the code you'd have to write to accomplish the same thing in CSS3 animations or transitions is often far more verbose, offsetting the kb savings. For example, let's take a relatively simple sequenced animation (see codepen or jsfiddle? GSAP code: var tl = new TimelineLite(); tl.staggerFrom('.box', 0.5, {opacity:0, scale:0, rotation:-180}, 0.3) .staggerTo('.box', 0.3, {scale:0.8}, 0.3, 0.7); This type of thing is impossible with CSS3 transitions, but it can be done with CSS3 animations as long as we give each element its own class name or ID. Let's take a look at the CSS code (see codepen or jsfiddle? Equivalent CSS3 Animation: .animated { -webkit-animation-fill-mode: both; -moz-animation-fill-mode: both; animation-fill-mode: both; -webkit-animation-duration: 1s; -moz-animation-duration: 1s; animation-duration: 1s; } @-webkit-keyframes introAnimation { 0% { -webkit-transform: scale(0) rotate(-180deg) ; opacity: 0; } 50% { -webkit-transform: scale(1) rotate(0deg) ; opacity: 1; } 70% { -webkit-transform: scale(1) rotate(0deg); } 100% { -webkit-transform: scale(0.8) rotate(0deg); } } @-moz-keyframes introAnimation { 0% { -moz-transform: scale(0) rotate(-180deg); opacity: 0; } 50% { -moz-transform: scale(1) rotate(0deg); opacity: 1; } 70%{ -moz-transform: scale(1) rotate(0deg); } 100% { -moz-transform: scale(0.8) rotate(0deg); } } @keyframes introAnimation { 00% { transform: scale(0) rotate(-180deg); opacity: 0; } 50% { transform: scale(1) rotate(0deg); opacity: 1; } 70%{ transform: scale(1) rotate(0deg); } 100% { transform: scale(0.8) rotate(0deg); } } .introAnimation { -webkit-backface-visibility: visible !important; -webkit-animation-name: introAnimation; -moz-backface-visibility: visible !important; -moz-animation-name: introAnimation; backface-visibility: visible !important; animation-name: introAnimation; } .two { -webkit-animation-delay: 0.3s; -moz-animation-delay: 0.3s; animation-delay: 0.3s; } .three { -webkit-animation-delay: 0.6s; -moz-animation-delay: 0.6s; animation-delay: 0.6s; } .four { -webkit-animation-delay: 0.9s; -moz-animation-delay: 0.9s; animation-delay: 0.9s; } .five { -webkit-animation-delay: 1.2s; -moz-animation-delay: 1.2s; animation-delay: 1.2s; } .six { -webkit-animation-delay: 1.5s; -moz-animation-delay: 1.5s; animation-delay: 1.5s; } .seven { -webkit-animation-delay: 1.8s; -moz-animation-delay: 1.8s; animation-delay: 1.8s; } .eight { -webkit-animation-delay: 2.1s; -moz-animation-delay: 2.1s; animation-delay: 2.1s; } .nine { -webkit-animation-delay: 2.4s; -moz-animation-delay: 2.4s; animation-delay: 2.4s; } As you can see, the CSS3 code is more than 10 times longer! And what if you want to have the entire sequence repeat 3 times? Good luck with that in CSS - you can set an animation-iteration-count but it only applies to each individual element, so it doesn't give us the effect we're after. And what if you want to experiment with the easing or offsets/delays or rotational values? It is quite cumbersome to say the least, even if you use sass or something like that. With GSAP, it's simple. If you only need very simple animations/transitions, CSS3 would deliver smaller file sizes, but once you start getting more aggressive and expressive with your animations, the scales shift quickly and GSAP becomes more economical. The other thing to keep in mind is that GSAP's JS file(s) are typically cached by the browser, so the savings page-to-page is much larger since the code you write on each page is far more concise. In other words, think of how much js/css the browser must actually request from the server over the course of your users' multi-page visit to your site. File size winner: TIE Flexibility Let's face it: basic tweening is pretty straightforward for any system, but it's really the details and advanced features that make a robust platform shine. GSAP crushes CSS3 transitions and animations when it comes to delivering a refined, professional-grade tool set that's truly flexible. Here are just a few of the conveniences baked into GSAP: Tween any numeric property of any object. Optionally round values to the nearest integer to make sure they're always landing on whole pixels/values. Animate along Bezier curves, even rotating along with the path or plotting a smoothly curved Bezier through a set of points you provide (including 3D!). GSAP's Bezier system is super flexible in that it's not just for x/y/z coordinates - it can handle ANY set of properties. Plus it will automatically adjust the movement so that it's correctly proportioned the entire way, avoiding a common problem that plagues Bezier animation systems. You can define Bezier data as Cubic or Quadratic or raw anchor points. Animate any color property of any JavaScript object (not just DOM elements). Define colors in any of the common formats like #F00 or #FF0000 or rgb(255,0,0) or rgba(255,0,0,1) or hsl(30, 50%, 80%) or hsla(30, 50%, 80%, 0.5) or "red". Set a custom fps (frames per second) for the entire engine (the default is 60fps). All tweens are perfectly synchronized (unlike many other tweening engines). Use the modern requestAnimationFrame API to drive refreshes or a standard setTimeout (the default is requestAnimationFrame with a fallback to setTimeout) Tons of easing options including proprietary SlowMo, RoughEase, and SteppedEase along with all the industry standards Animate css style sheet rules themselves with CSSRulePlugin Animate the rotation of an object in a specific direction (clockwise, counter-clockwise, or whichever is shortest) by appending "_cw", "_ccw", and "_short" to the value. You can tween getter/setter methods, not just properties. For example, myObject.getProp() and myObject.setProp() can be tweened like TweenLite.to(myObject, 1, {setProp:10}); and it will automatically recognize that it's a method and call getProp() to get the current value when the tween starts. Same for jQuery-style getters/setters that use a shared method like myObject.prop(). You can even tween another tween or timeline! For example, TweenLite.to(otherTween, 1, {timeScale:0.5}) would animate otherTween.timeScale to 0.5 over the course of 1 second. You can even scrub the virtual playhead of one tween/timeine with another tween by animating its "time". Flexibility winner: GSAP Conclusion Despite the hype surrounding CSS3 transitions and animations, they just aren't well-suited for professional-grade animation tasks. They did manage to win a few rounds in this match but ultimately GSAP man-handled them, sending them running from the ring like scared sissies. Of course we're slightly biased, but check out the facts for yourself. Kick the tires. Audition GSAP on your next project. See how it feels once you get past the initial learning curve. If you only need simple fades or very basic animation in modern browsers, CSS3 transitions are probably just fine. However, what happens when your client wants to do something more expressive? What if browser compatibility becomes an issue? Why not build on a solid foundation to begin with so that you don't find yourself having to rewrite all your animation code? If you want professional-grade scripted animation, look no further. To get started fast, check out our Jump Start tour. Recommended reading: Main GSAP JS page Why GSAP? A practical guide for developers Jump Start: GSAP JS jQuery vs GSAP: cage match 3D Transforms & More CSS3 Goodies Arrive in GSAP JS Speed comparison Explanation of CSS3 transitions, transforms and animations P.S. A rant about where animation logic belongs: We can't put this post to bed without mentioning a beef we've got with the whole concept of putting all your animation logic in css. Ever since the <blink> tag, there has been this tendency for browser vendors to offer developers these nifty "conveniences" that end up encouraging them to mix markup and/or style rules with behavioral logic. Is that really a good idea? One of the wonderful things about the modern web is that we've got this lovely separation between markup, presentation/styling, and behavioral logic (at least that's the goal). Should we be blurring the line like this? Isn't JavaScript the logic layer that should be handling state changes, application logic, reaction to user interaction (which often includes animation), etc.? Some may claim "But putting animation in css is great because that way if the user has JavaScript disabled, the animations still work!" Do you really think users of the modern web can turn off JavaScript and expect to browse the web with great results? Is that who you're targeting for a rich experience? And if they turned off JavaScript, might they have done so specifically to avoid annoying animations? Is it really helping to shift animation logic into css where they can't turn it off? In the web of yesteryear, animations were quite simplistic; fade this, slide that. Done. Anything more aggressive was relegated to a plugin like Flash which afforded incredible richness and complexity in terms of animation. But today, clients want that sort of expressiveness directly in the browser. It needs to work on mobile devices. It's no longer about simple fade-ins or sliding an image across the screen. CSS3 transitions fit the old mentality well, but not the new one. CSS3 animations technically provide more flexibility but they fall miserably short and they still force behavioral logic into the style layer. And to use them effectively, we still need JavaScript to at least swap classes and trigger things. From a development and debugging standpoint, when I apply a class to an element how would I know if that will trigger an animation or transition or neither? Should I have to keep bouncing back and forth between css and JS to manage behavioral logic related to animations? Maybe we're just ill-informed and there are some fantastic reasons for putting behavioral logic like animation into the css layer, but one thing seems pretty clear: the current way that developers have to build all but the simplest css animation leaves a LOT to be desired. The API is terribly limiting and clunky. Let's move the web forward. Let's make animation fun and flexible. Let's keep behavioral logic and style rules distinct. Let's leverage the incredible flexibility of JavaScript. If we've misrepresented anything here or if you want to weigh in with your opinion about where behavioral logic like animation belongs, feel free to post your comment below. If you're someone who has attempted an aggressive animation task with CSS3 transitions/animations as well as GSAP, we'd love to hear how you felt they compared.
  11. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Update: don't miss our guest post on css-tricks.com, Myth Busting: CSS Animations vs. JavaScript which provides some additional data, visual examples, and a speed test focused on this topic. jQuery is the 700-pound gorilla that has been driving lots of animation on the web for years, but let's see how it fares when it steps into the ring with the feisty GSAP (GreenSock Animation Platform) which gained its fame in the Flash world and is now flexing its greased-up muscles in JavaScript. Before we put the gloves on, we need to make it clear that we've got the utmost respect for jQuery, its authors, and its community of users (to which we belong). It's a fantastic tool that we highly recommend for non-animation tasks. This tongue-in-cheek "cage match" is solely focused on animation. Performance Performance is paramount, especially on mobile devices with sluggish processors. Silky smooth animation is the hallmark of any animation platform worth its weight. This round wasn't even close. GSAP was up to 20 TIMES faster than jQuery under heavy stress. See a speed comparison for yourself or make your own. Performance winner: GSAP Controls With jQuery, you can stop an animation but that's about it. Some 3rd party plugins add resume capability, but jQuery takes a pounding in this round. GSAP's object oriented architecture allows you to pause, resume, reverse, restart, or jump to any spot in any tween. Even adjust timeScale on the fly for slow motion or fastforward effects. Place tweens in a timeline with precise scheduling (including overlaps or gaps) and then control the whole thing just like it's a single tween. All of the easing and effects remain perfectly intact as you reverse, pause, adjust timeScale, etc. And you can even kill individual portions of a tween anytime (like if a tween is controlling both "top" and "left" properties, you can kill "left" while "top" continues). Put labels in a timeline to mark important spots and seek() to them anytime. Imagine trying to build the example below using jQuery. It would be virtually impossible. With GSAP, it's easy. In fact, all of the animation is done with 2 lines of code. Drag the slider, click the buttons below, and see how easy it is to control the sequenced animation. See the Pen Impossible with jQuery: controls (used in jquery cagematch) by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Controls winner: GSAP Tweenable Properties jQuery.animate() works with basic numeric properties, but that's about it. If you want to do more, you'll need to rely on lots of 3rd party plugins which may have spotty support or unresolved bugs. GSAP's CSSPlugin handles almost anything you throw at it while protecting you from various browser bugs and prefix requirements. GSAP jQuery  = supported    = supported with 3rd party plugins    = partially supported with 3rd party plugins Basic numeric css properties like left, top, opacity, fontSize, etc. Supported Supported Colors like backgroundColor, borderColor, etc. Supported Supported with 3rd party plugins backgroundPosition Supported Supported with 3rd party plugins boxShadow Supported Supported with 3rd party plugins clip Supported Supported with 3rd party plugins textShadow (including multiple text shadows) Supported Partially supported with 3rd party plugins 2D transforms like rotation, scaleX, scaleY, x, y, skewX, and skewY, including 2D transformOrigin and directional rotation functionality Supported Partially supported with 3rd party plugins 3D transforms like rotationY rotationX, z, and perspective, including 3D transformOrigin and directional rotation functionality Supported Partially supported wiht 3rd party plugins borderRadius (without the need to define each corner and use browser prefixes) Supported Partially supported with 3rd party plugins className allows you to define a className (or use "+=" or "-=" to add/remove a class) and have the engine figure out which properties are different and animate the differences using whatever ease and duration you want. Supported Partially supported with 3rd party plugins Tweenable properties winner: GSAP Workflow When you're creating fun and interesting animations, workflow is critical. You need to be able to quickly build sequences, stagger start times, overlap tweens, experiment with eases, leverage various callbacks and labels, and create concise code. You need to be able to modularize your code by creating functions that each spit back an animation object (tween or timeline) which can be inserted into another timeline at a precise time. You need a flexible, powerful system that lets you experiment without wasting hours wrestling with a limited tool set. jQuery has some nice simple convenience methods like show(), hide(), fadeIn(), and fadeOut(), but GSAP bloodies its nose in this round: GSAP jQuery  = supported    = unsupported Easily create sequences (even with overlapping animations) that can be controlled as a whole Supported Unupported Flexible object-oriented architecture that allows animations to be nested inside other animations as deeply as you want Supported Unupported Animate things into place (backwards) with convenience methods like from() and staggerFrom() Supported Unupported Accommodate virtually any ease including Bounce, Elastic, SlowMo, RoughEase, SteppedEase, etc. Supported Unupported Create a staggered animation effect for an array of objects using one method call (like staggerTo(), staggerFrom(), or staggerFromTo()) Supported Unupported Easily repeat and/or yoyo a tween a specific number of times (or indefinitely) without resorting to callbacks or redundant code Supported Unupported Callbacks for when a tween or timeline starts, updates, completes, repeats, and finishes reversing, plus optionally pass any number of parameters to those callbacks Supported Unupported Place labels at specific times in a sequence so that you can seek() to them and/or insert animations there. Supported Unupported Animate any numeric property of any JavaScript object, not just DOM elements Supported Unupported Call a function whenever the entire platform finishes updating on each frame (like for a game loop) Supported Unupported Workflow winner: GSAP Compatibility Browser inconsistencies and bugs are the bane of our existence as developers. Whether it's the way Internet Explorer 8 implements opacity or Safari's transformOrigin bug that wreaks havok on 3D transforms or the fact that browser prefixes are required to enable many of the more modern browser features, you want your animations to "just work" without having to learn all the annoying hacks. jQuery does a great job of delivering cross-browser consistency overall, but when it comes to animation it falls a bit short mainly because it doesn't even attempt to handle the more modern CSS properties. No JavaScript framework can work miracles and suddenly make IE8 do fluid 3D transforms, for example, but GSAP implements a bunch of workarounds under the hood to solve problems wherever possible. It can do 2D transforms like rotation, scaleX, scaleY, x, y, skewX, and skewY all the way back to IE6 including transformOrigin and directional rotation functionality! Plus it works around scores of other browser issues so that you can focus on the important stuff. Compatibility winner: GSAP Popularity jQuery has been around for a long time and has gained incredible popularity because it does many things well. It's like the Swiss Army knife of JavaScript. There probably isn't a single JavaScript tool that's more popular than jQuery, and GSAP is no exception. As the new kid on the block, GSAP is gonna have to prove itself in the JavaScript community just like it did in the Flash community before it's crowned the undisputed champion. Popularity winner: jQuery Conflict management What happens if there's already a tween running that's controlling a particular object's property and a competing tween begins? jQuery does nothing to manage the conflict - the original tween keeps running. For example, let's say you're animating an element's "top" to 100px and that tween still has 2 seconds left before it's done, and another tween starts running that animates the same element's "top" to 0px over the course of 1 second. It would tween to 0px and then immediately jump to almost 100px and finish that [first] tween. Yuck. GSAP automatically senses these conflicts and handles them behind the scenes. In this case, it would kill the "top" portion of the first tween as soon as the second tween begins. Plus there are several other overwrite modes you can choose from if that's not the behavior you want. Conflict management winner: GSAP Support Both jQuery and GSAP have thriving support forums, but since right now jQuery has a massive user base, you're very likely to find someone with an answer to your question. Even though the GreenSock forums rarely have a question that remains unanswered for more than 24 hours, jQuery's pervasiveness gives it an edge here. On the other hand, GreenSock's forums are manned by paid staff (including the author of the platform), so you're quite likely to get solid answers there. Add to that the fact that GreenSock has a track record of being much more agile in terms of squashing bugs and releasing updates than jQuery, so we'll call this round a tie. Support winner: tie Expandability jQuery and GSAP both offer a plugin architecture, but since jQuery has been out much longer and gained so much popularity, there are numerous plugins available. Some are good, some are not, but there is a thriving community of plugin developers out there. Even though technically they're both equally expandable, the sheer number of plugins currently available for jQuery give it the advantage in this round. Expandability winner: jQuery Learning resources Again, jQuery's popularity trumps anything GSAP could throw at it right now. There are lots of tutorials, videos, and articles about jQuery whereas GSAP is new to the game. GreenSock is being aggressive about putting together solid resources (like the Jump Start tour) and the community is crankin' out some great articles and videos too, but jQuery scores the win in this round. Learning resources winner: jQuery Price & license Both jQuery and GSAP are completely free for almost every type of usage and both allow you to edit the raw source code to fix bugs (if that's something you need to do). If you plan to use GSAP in a product/app/site/game for which a fee is collected from multiple customers, you need the commercial license that comes with "Business Green" Club GreenSock memberships (one-off commercial projects don't need the special license). It's actually a more business-friendly license in many ways than a typical open source license that offers no warranties or backing of any kind or imposes code sharing or credit requirements. GreenSock's licensing model provides a small funding mechanism that benefits the entire user base because it empowers continued innovation and support, keeping it free for the vast majority of users. See the licensing page for details. jQuery employs an MIT license and is free for virtually all uses. As much as we all like "free" software, there's always a cost somewhere. jQuery has a few large corporate sponsors that have helped keep it viable. Both jQuery and GreenSock have long track records of delivering updates, bug fixes, and new features (GreenSock is newer to JavaScript, but served the Flash community since around 2006). Both count some of the largest companies in the world among their user base. Although there are some clear benefits of GreenSocks' license over jQuery's, we'll give this round to jQuery because it is technically "free" in more scenarios than GSAP. Price & license winner: jQuery File size jQuery weighs in at about 32kb gzipped and minified whereas GSAP's TweenLite and CSSPlugin are about half that combined. So in half the size, you're getting significantly more animation capabilities and speed. GSAP is built in a modular fashion that allows you to use just the parts that you need. Of course jQuery serves many other purposes beyond animation, but in this cage match we're focused on animation. Even if you add up TweenLite, TimelineLite, TimelineMax, TweenMax, EasePack, CSSPlugin, BezierPlugin, AttrPlugin, DirectionalRotationPlugin, and RoundPropsPlugin, it's still almost 20% less than jQuery. File size winner: GSAP Flexibility Let's face it: any tweening engine can handle the basics of animating one value to another, but it's really the details and advanced features that make a robust platform shine. GSAP crushes jQuery when it comes to delivering a refined, professional-grade tool set that's truly flexible. All these conveniences are baked into GSAP (no 3rd party plugins required): Tween any numeric property of any object. Optionally round values to the nearest integer to make sure they're always landing on whole pixels/values. Animate along Bezier curves, even rotating along with the path or plotting a smoothly curved Bezier through a set of points you provide (including 3D!). GSAP's Bezier system is super flexible in that it's not just for x/y/z coordinates - it can handle ANY set of properties. Plus it will automatically adjust the movement so that it's correctly proportioned the entire way, avoiding a common problem that plagues Bezier animation systems. You can define Bezier data as Cubic or Quadratic or raw anchor points. Animate any color property of any JavaScript object (not just DOM elements). Define colors in any of the common formats like #F00 or #FF0000 or rgb(255,0,0) or rgba(255,0,0,1) or hsl(30, 50%, 80%) or hsla(30, 50%, 80%, 0.5) or "red". Set a custom fps (frames per second) for the entire engine. The default is 60fps. All tweens are perfectly synchronized (unlike many other tweening engines). Use the modern requestAnimationFrame API to drive refreshes or a standard setTimeout (default is requestAnimationFrame with a fallback to setTimeout) Tons of easing options including proprietary SlowMo, RoughEase and SteppedEase along with all the industry standards Animate css style sheet rules themselves with CSSRulePlugin Animate the rotation of an object in a specific direction (clockwise, counter-clockwise, or whichever is shortest) by appending "_cw", "_ccw", and "_short" to the value. You can tween getter/setter methods, not just properties. For example, myObject.getProp() and myObject.setProp() can be tweened like TweenLite.to(myObject, 1, {setProp:10}); and it will automatically recognize that it's a method and call getProp() to get the current value when the tween starts. Same for jQuery-style getters/setters that use a shared method like myObject.prop(). You can even tween another tween or timeline! For example, TweenLite.to(otherTween, 1, {timeScale:0.5}) would animate otherTween.timeScale to 0.5 over the course of 1 second. You can even scrub the virtual playhead of one tween/timeine with another tween by animating its "time". Use plugins like ThrowPropsPlugin for momentum-based motion, and RaphaelPlugin, EaselPlugin, and KineticPlugin for those [canvas or svg] libraries (Raphael, EaselJS, and KineticJS). Plus there are physics-based plugins like Phyics2DPlugin and PhysicsPropsPlugin as well as a fun ScrambleTextPlugin for Club GreenSock members. Flexibility winner: GSAP Conclusion jQuery eeked out a few decent rounds, but ultimately GSAP left it lying on the mat in a pool of its own blood. Of course we're slightly biased, but check out the facts for yourself. Kick the tires. Audition GSAP on your next project. See how it feels. If you only need simple fades or very basic animation, jQuery is probably just fine. In fact, its fadeIn() and fadeOut() methods are quite convenient. However, what happens when your client wants to do something more expressive? Or what if they start complaining that animation isn't smooth on mobile devices? Why not build on a solid foundation to begin with so that you don't find yourself having to rewrite all your animation code? If you want professional-grade scripted animation, look no further. To get started fast, check out our Jump Start tour. Update: there's now a jquery.gsap.js plugin that allows you to continue using jQuery.animate() but have GSAP drive the animations under the hood, thus delivering much better speed plus a bunch of new properties that you can tween (like colors, 2D and 3D transforms, boxShadow, textShadow, borderRadius, clip, etc.). Read more about the plugin here. Recommended reading: Main GSAP JS page jQuery.animate() with GSAP: get the jquery.gsap.js plugin! Why GSAP? A practical guide for developers Jump Start: GSAP JS CSS3 transitions vs GSAP: cage match Speed comparison 3D Transforms & More CSS3 Goodies Arrive in GSAP JS
  12. Hi, Experimenting with js version. I wonder if there is a js version of overwrite manager? I am having weird behavior sometimes. And right now i guess we should not use tweenlite/max for production. ?
  13. Hello, Here's the scenario: I create e-Learning and in the past I have used simple jQuery to show and hide divs when buttons are clicked. I'm still doing this, but I'm now using TweenMax to add some nice animation. My problem is that if you click the buttons quickly in turn I get an animation build up. I would like only the last animation to finish, before the last button click animation starts. I've tried using Overwrite, but nothing seems to effect it. You may ask "But why would a user go click happy on the buttons?". But that just what some people do. Here's my jQuery and TweenMax code: var tl = new TimelineMax; $(document).ready(function() { $("#Person001_btn").click(function() { tl.to([introduction, Person001, Person002, Person003, Person004, Person005, Person006], 0.75, {css:{left:"-600px", autoAlpha:0}, ease:Power2.easeInOut}); tl.to(Person001, 0.5, {css:{left:"0px", autoAlpha:1}, ease:Power2.easeInOut}); }); $("#Person002_btn").click(function() { tl.to([introduction, Person001, Person002, Person003, Person004, Person005, Person006], 0.75, {css:{left:"-600px", autoAlpha:0}, ease:Power2.easeInOut}); tl.to(Person002, 0.5, {css:{left:"0px", autoAlpha:1}, ease:Power2.easeInOut}); }); $("#Person003_btn").click(function() { tl.to([introduction, Person001, Person002, Person003, Person004, Person005, Person006], 0.75, {css:{left:"-600px", autoAlpha:0}, ease:Power2.easeInOut}); tl.to(Person003, 0.5, {css:{left:"0px", autoAlpha:1}, ease:Power2.easeInOut}); }); $("#Person004_btn").click(function() { tl.to([introduction, Person001, Person002, Person003, Person004, Person005, Person006], 0.75, {css:{left:"-600px", autoAlpha:0}, ease:Power2.easeInOut}); tl.to(Person004, 0.5, {css:{left:"0px", autoAlpha:1}, ease:Power2.easeInOut}); }); $("#Person005_btn").click(function() { tl.to([introduction, Person001, Person002, Person003, Person004, Person005, Person006], 0.75, {css:{left:"-600px", autoAlpha:0}, ease:Power2.easeInOut}); tl.to(Person005, 0.5, {css:{left:"0px", autoAlpha:1}, ease:Power2.easeInOut}); }); $("#Person006_btn").click(function() { tl.to([introduction, Person001, Person002, Person003, Person004, Person005, Person006], 0.75, {css:{left:"-600px", autoAlpha:0}, ease:Power2.easeInOut}); tl.to(Person006, 0.5, {css:{left:"0px", autoAlpha:1}, ease:Power2.easeInOut}); }); }); And if it helps, here is the HTML: <div class="PeopleThumbContainer" id="PeopleThumbContainer"> <div class="Person"> <a href="#" class="Person" id="Person001_btn"> <p>Janine<br /> Cost Centre Manager<br /> Capita Symonds</p> <img src="images/people/person_001.jpg" /></a></div> <div class="Person"> <a href="#" class="Person" id="Person002_btn"> <p>Barry<br /> Web developer<br /> Capita L&D</p> <img src="images/people/person_002.jpg" /></a></div> <div class="Person"> <a href="#" class="Person" id="Person003_btn"> <p>Reginald<br /> Consultant<br /> Capita IB Services</p> <img src="images/people/person_001.jpg" /></a></div> <div class="Person"> <a href="#" class="Person" id="Person004_btn"> <p>Lisa<br /> Cost Centre Manager<br /> Capita Symonds</p> <img src="images/people/person_001.jpg" /></a></div> <div class="Person"> <a href="#" class="Person" id="Person005_btn"> <p>Nigel<br /> Cost Centre Manager<br /> Capita Symonds</p> <img src="images/people/person_001.jpg" /></a></div> <div class="Person"> <a href="#" class="Person" id="Person006_btn"> <p>Sarah<br /> Cost Centre Manager<br /> Capita Symonds</p> <img src="images/people/person_001.jpg" /></a></div> </div> <div class="PeopleContainer" id="PeopleContainer"> <div class="Introduction" id="Introduction"><a name="maincontent" id="maincontent"></a> <p>What do people like about working in Capita? What are the benefits of working for such a large organisation?</p> <p><strong>Select the employees on the right</strong> to see what they have to say about things?</p> </div> <div class="PeopleContent" id="Person001"> <img src="images/people/person_001_big.png" /> <div class="text"> <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.</p> <p>Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.</p> <p>Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.</p> </div> </div> <div class="PeopleContent" id="Person002"> <img src="images/people/person_002_big.png" /> <div class="text"> <p>Text 2</p> </div> </div> <div class="PeopleContent" id="Person003"> <img src="images/people/person_001_big.png" /> <div class="text"> <p>Text 3</p> </div> </div> <div class="PeopleContent" id="Person004"> <img src="images/people/person_001_big.png" /> <div class="text"> <p>Text 4</p> </div> </div> <div class="PeopleContent" id="Person005"> <img src="images/people/person_001_big.png" /> <div class="text"> <p>Text 5</p> </div> </div> <div class="PeopleContent" id="Person006"> <img src="images/people/person_001_big.png" /> <div class="text"> <p>Text 6</p> </div> </div> </div> Thanks is advance. Barry
  14. Hi, Despite what the title says, I'm fairly sure I can't do that, and I'll have to overwrite the tween. But, I'm using a PowerN.easeIn, so the element looks like it's dropping into place, and I've not been able to work out a way of interrupting the tween in a smooth way, it's very noticable... So, can anyone recommend a way to stop a PowerN tween at an arbitrary point, and to create a new tween which would effectively continue the original from where it left off (I can get the remaining duration, but, I'm unable to match the easeIn.) Thanks, Charlie
  15. Hello guys, 1st of, I want to say that I did alot of research on this one, and the solutions I found weren't the best, so I was hoping somebody could help me here. I'm also aware that ScrollMagic is not made by Greensock, and that people try to keep forum focused on GSAP, but I had no better place to ask, since scrollmagic issue page is very inactive. I hope you wont mind my question. I use GSAP(TimelineLite) and ScrollMagic to animate element once it gets triggered by ScrollMagic's TriggerElement. And that works fine, if I keep scrolling, element will stay in animated state, unless I scroll up again, way about trigger element, and then the animation will reverse (usually not visible because of tiggerElement position). And then it plays again once i scroll down to triggerElement, this also works fine, just as I wanted. But another thing that I want, is also, when I scroll down past the animated element, I want it to do reverse animation (or just fades out, doesnt matter as it wont be visible since we scrolled out of viewport). And then i want animation to run again once I scroll up. TL;DR: I want animation to play on both, scroll down and scroll up ways, once it is in triggerElement. The solutions I have found: The solutions I found were the make 2 scenes one for animate in and other to overwrite it, however, Jan Paepke said this can be glitchy and not working properly depending how fast user scrolls, and here is his look at this problem: https://github.com/janpaepke/ScrollMagic/wiki/WARNING:-tween-was-overwritten-by-another (My CodePen doesn't have this solution included) Now, this solution is from 2014, and I dont think it's very clean one, so I was hoping that someone can help me find better solution. PS Im also aware that Blake has solution without ScrollMagic, but Im JS noob so I would rather not. Thanks in advance for your time
  16. I don't really understand this: You want to animate something that isn't in view? The warning you posted is if you animate the same properties. That's when an overwrite will occur. If you simply want the first scene to scale and then fade out, a second scene with a new trigger would work fine. They aren't animating the same properties. https://codepen.io/PointC/pen/RzLZyr Happy tweening.
  17. I can't figure something out. I am trying to: Simply stated, I have loaded an XML doc. Changed it within Flash. I then want to update the XML doc on the server. Then reload the XML back into Flash. I have one main .xml document - "StudentXML.xml" (This is the file I want to overwrite with new info - it is also the file I read from with the application begins.) And one main .php document - "index.php" (sorry for my crappy naming standards..) Here is the PHP code I found (hoping it would do what I wanted) located in "index.php": <?php $filename = "StudentXML.xml"; $raw_xml = file_get_contents("php://input"); print $raw_xml; $fp = fopen($filename, "w"); fwrite($fp, $raw_xml); fclose($fp); ?> Here is my data I want to change and see transfered to the server to overwrite the current XML Document. At this point, I have already loaded, accessed, and read my StudentXML.xml within Flash. var newLogin:XML = <badge>eStudioLogin</badge>; studentXML.id.(@number == studentID.toString()).allBadgeNames.prependChild(newLogin); studentXML.id.(@number == studentID.toString()).badgesEarned = int(studentXML.id.(@number == studentID.toString()).badgesEarned) + 1; So far, and this is not working, I have pieced together this lovely bit of code: var requested:URLRequest = new URLRequest("www.mysite.com/index.php"); requested.data = studentXML; // This does trace the entire [i]edited[/i] XML document that is in Flash requested.method = URLRequestMethod.POST; var loader:XMLLoader = new XMLLoader(requested,{name:"StudentXML",onProgress:showProgress}); loader.load(); I know I am being dumb. It can't be this hard to transfer data and overwrite an existing xml document. Any help would truly be appreciated. Thanks, Adam
  18. You'll need to set() it after your resizeBounds function is called because that's where you set the bounds. resizeBounds(true); TweenMax.set(".draggable", {x: 125}); As you have it coded now, that will have no effect because you have this tween in that resize function: TweenLite.from(draggable.target, 0.3, {x:x, y:y}); That would immediately overwrite the set() tween. I just commented out that tween in the resize function so you can see that everything works. https://codepen.io/PointC/pen/LKyraJ You could also used a delayed call for the initial set() if you need to keep that tween in the resize function. (I'm assuming you do, but didn't have time to look through everything in your code.) https://greensock.com/docs/TweenMax/static.delayedCall() Hopefully that helps. Happy tweening.
  19. You have a conflict between two tweens. The second scale tween is starting before the first finishes so you can't get all the way back to the original value because of the overwrite. The easiest solution is to remove the position parameter from the last tween or make it 1.5 so it starts after the first scale finishes. https://codepen.io/PointC/pen/EzBjWq Happy tweening.
  20. No problems! I tried setting the overwrite... overwrite but the problem still seems to be there, i also tried double setting in the begging to be sure that the properties are set video: http://luckyde.com/bugB_1.mp4 I tried setting it to "none" too or having all of the tweens to have overwrite:false with no luck But it still does this bug, as soon as you introduce a second thing to animate it says its value is not a number/freezes Any ideas would be really really appreciated thank you!
  21. First of all, thanks for being an advocate for GreenSock at Zynga! ? And yes, I'm pretty sure that it's an overwrite issue. Try setting overwrite:false on your tween(s) or you could just set TweenLite.defaultOverwrite = false. The plugin you're using doesn't look like it handles the overwrites properly. So every "transform" tween, when it renders for the first time, will kill any other "transform" tweens that are running at that time. See what I mean?
  22. They kind of have to come up with their own transform solution because React Native does not work with actual HTML/CSS. It uses JavaScript to control views of actual native applications i.e. iOS and Android, so there is nothing like getComputedStyle. https://facebook.github.io/react-native/docs/transforms I was just thinking that there might have been an overwrite issue with the way the plugins are written. I remember a 3rd party Pixi plugin having the same issues that Luckyde described. My next guess for the issue would be that the .setNativeProps() calls are overwriting the style/transform objects. But that's just a guess. I've never used React Native. https://facebook.github.io/react-native/docs/direct-manipulation
  23. Yeah, I suspect it could be an overwrite thing or (more likely) mishandling of transforms. We had to do a bunch of work to ensure that all the transform components can be independently animated, plus a whole bunch of other transform-specific challenges. See https://greensock.com/transforms for details. I don't see them handling all that stuff in the "transform" plugin they created, but I'm not very familiar with exactly what they're doing, what constraints there are with native, etc. I must admit it feels a little weird to be spending time troubleshooting a 3rd party plugin that's "borrowing" GSAP's API/code (ineffectively). ?
  24. Ah you were totally right! That is so obvious now that I think about it It's good to know that tweens just overwrite the old ones. I've got the animation working and can keep on tinkering. Thanks a bunch!
  25. I'm not a React guy (@Rodrigo is our resident expert, and he authored that article you linked to), but my guess is that your problem is that you're creating the tween in the componentDidMount(), but then you're playing that same tween again and again in the componentDidUpdate() method. Remember, the first time a tween renders, it internally records the starting/ending values so that it can very efficiently interpolate on each "tick". Your updates are having no effect. Instead of just play()-ing that same tween instance in your componentDidUpdate(), I'd create a new one and feed in the new x/y values. The new tween will overwrite the old one anyway. Does that help at all? If you're still having trouble, it'd help a lot if you provide a reduced test case in codepen or stackblitz or something like that. Happy tweening!
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